The Marc Steiner Show

Sound Bites

Sound Bites: Sandtown–Building a Model for Food and Jobs

Soundbites Sandtown (Credit: Steiner Show)June 15, 2017 – Segment 2

We hosed a special archive edition of Sound Bites, our series on our food and our world. We traveled to the Sandtown Winchester neighborhood of Baltimore for a town hall meeting on food sovereignty, held in partnership with Johns Hopkins’ Baltimore Food and Faith Project, and titled Sandtown: Building a Model for Food and Jobs. I talked with three members of the faith community who were working on food and employment issues in interesting and effective ways: Elder C.W. Harris of Strength to Love II Farm and Newborn Holistic Ministries; Antoine Bennet of New Song Community Church; and Melissa Kellyof the No Boundaries Coalition.


Soundbites: The Peoples Climate March & Renewable Energy In Maryland

climateApril 13, 2017 – Segment 2

We hosted the newest edition of our series on our food and our world, Sound Bites. We continued our countdown to the Peoples Climate March, taking place in DC on April 29. We talked about what renewable energy means for the country under Trump as well as for Maryland, specifically. Can Maryland become a hub for renewable energy and can the nation continue to progress towards renewable energy under Donald Trump?

We talked with: Daphne Wysham, Director of the Climate and Energy Program at the Center for Sustainable Economy; and Janet Redman, US Policy Director with Oil Change International and Associate Fellow with the Climate Policy Program at the Institute for Policy Studies in Washington, DC.
We also talked with Arjun Makhijani, President of the Institute for Energy and Environmental Research. Most recently, Dr, Makhijani wrote Carbon-Free and Nuclear-Free: A Roadmap for U.S. Energy Policy, the first analysis of a transition to a U.S. economy based completely on renewable energy without any use of fossil fuels or nuclear power.

Sound Bites: Climate Change and The Future

climate changeApril 6, 2017 – Segment 3

We hosted the latest edition of Sound Bites, our series on our food and our world. We examined the historical context of the climate change debate. The discussion springs from a 2014 article by Charles Mann in the Atlantic Monthly: “How to Talk about Climate Change so People Will Listen.”

Our guests are: Dr. Paul Sabin, associate professor in the Department of History at Yale University, Director of Undergraduate Studies for Yale’s undergraduate Environmental Studies major, and author of The Bet: Paul Ehrlich, Julian Simon, and Our Gamble Over Earth’s Future; and Dr. Dale Jamieson, professor of Environmental Studies and Philosophy, Affiliated Professor of Law, and Director of the Animal Studies Initiative at New York University, and author of Reason in a Dark Time: Why the Struggle to Stop Climate Change Failed – and What It Means For Our Future.

We then hosted a diverse panel of guests who considered the reality of climate change and how we can effectively talk about it.
Our guests for the panel are: Dr. Patrick Allitt, Cahoon Family Professor of American History at Emory University and author of A Climate of Crisis: America in the Age of EnvironmentalismJacqui Patterson, Director of the NAACP Environmental and Climate Justice Program; Daphne Wysham, a fellow at the Institute for Policy Studies (IPS) where she directs the Genuine Progress Project; and Maryam Adrangi, campaigner with the Council of Canadians and organizer of Rising Tide: Vancouver Coast Salish Territories.

Soundbites: the Chesapeake Bay, Sustainable Food, & Fracking

bayMarch 30, 2017 – Segment 2

We hosted the newest episode of our series about our food and our world, Sound Bites. We began with Chesapeake Bay Foundation President William C. Baker, who joined us to talk about how the Trump Administration is proposing to eliminate all funding to the EPA’s Chesapeake Bay Program.
Then, Bruce Friedrich, Executive Director of The Good Food Institute – which works to create a healthy, humane and sustainable food supply – joined us to talk about alternative sources for meat.
Bruce Friedrich will deliver McDaniel College’s annual Ridington Lecture on Tuesday, April 11, 7 p.m. in McDaniel Lounge, 2 College Hill, Westminster, Md. The lecture is open to the public and titled “Seeds of Disruption: How Markets and Food Technology Will Save the World.” For more information click here or call 410-857-2290.
Finally, Steiner Show Senior Producer Mark Gunnery talked with Mitch Jones, Senior Policy Advocate at Food & Water Watch, about the fracking ban in Maryland

Sound Bites: Mustafa Ali

March 23, 2017 – Segment 2 

Listen in to a brand new episode of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world, when we talk with Mustafa Ali, speaker, trainer and facilitator on social justice and environmental justice issues. He is formerly the Senior Advisor to the Administrator for Environmental Justice at the Environmental Protection Agency, where he worked for 24 years to alleviate the impact of air, water and industrial pollution on poverty-stricken towns and neighborhoods.


SoundBites: The Future of Environmental Activism, and the Chicken Box

Chicken Box (Credit: Baltimore Sun)March 16, 2017 – Segment 2

We hosted our newest episode of Sound Bites, our series on our food and our world. We examined what environmental protection and activism will look like under the Trump administration.

With: Tom Philpott, food and agriculture correspondent for Mother JonesJanet Redman, U.S. Policy Director at Oil Change International; and Basav Sen, Director of the Climate Policy Program for the Institute for Policy Studies in Washington, DC.

We also took a special look at a Baltimore staple – the Chicken Box!
With: Brittany Britto, writer for the Baltimore Sun who wrote “Unpacking the chicken box: The story behind Baltimore’s carryout staple;” and Psyche Williams-Forson, Associate Professor and Chair of the American Studies Department of University of Maryland – College Park and author of Building Houses out of Chicken Legs: Black Women, Food, and Power.

Sound Bites: EPA Under Trump and Fracking in Maryland

March 9, 2017 – Segment 3 fracking

Then, it’s the newest episode of our series on our food and our world, Sound Bites. We begin the hour with a look at the EPA under the Trump administration. With: Alex Guillén, Energy reporter for POLITICO Pro who Covers the EPA, regulations and coal, as well as lobbying and campaign finance in the energy realm; and Jacqui Patterson, Director of the Environmental and Climate Justice Program at the NAACP.
We close the show with a look at the state of fracking in Maryland. With: Mitch Jones, Senior Policy Advocate at Food and Water Watch; and Drew Cobbs, Executive Director of the Maryland Petroleum Council.

Sound Bites: Food Waste and Recovery

March 2, 2017 – Segment 3 

On our newest edition of our series about our food and our world, Sound Bites. This week the topic is Food Waste & Recovery, which addresses issues that include jobs, food security and hunger, waste, public health, and community. We begin the hour with an overview of this important issue, with: Dr. Roni Neff, Director of Hopkins Center for Livable Future‘s Food System Sustainability and Public Health Program and Assistant Professor in the Bloomberg School’s Environmental Health Sciences Department and Health Policy and Management Departments; and Brenda Platt, co-Director of the Institute for Local Self-Reliance and Director of their Composting for Community Initiative.
Then we take a look at two local programs that are performing community work around Food Waste and Recovery. With: Michael Dorsey, Director of Community Initiatives at Chesapeake Center for Youth Development; and Michelle Antoinette Nelson, aka LOVE the Poet, Founder of Brown + Healthy.

Sound Bites: Climate Change and Oyster Restoration

February 23, 2017 – Segment 2 

The newest edition of our series on our food and our world, Sound Bites. We begin the hour with a discussion on Climate Change and Maryland. With Dr. Don Boesch, President of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science.
We turn to Oyster Restoration in the Chesapeake Bay. With: Robert Brown, President of Maryland’s Watermen’s Association; and Allison Colden, Chesapeake Bay Foundations’ Maryland Fisheries Scientist.

Soundbites: Environmental Bills, Fermentation, & Immigration

Immigration Food Prep (Credit: New York Times)February 16, 2017 – Segment 3

We hosted our newest episode of Sound Bites, our series on our food and our world, we began the segment with a couple environmental bills currently before the Maryland Legislature, the Clean Water Commerce Act and the Polystyrene Phase Out. With: Betsy Nicholas, Co-chair of Maryland Clean Agriculture Coalition and Executive Director of Waterkeepers Chesapeake.
We then took a brief foray into the world of fermentation as Marc talked with Sandor Ellix Katz, a fermentation revivalist and author of Wild Fermentation, The Revolution Will Not Be Microwaved and The Art of Fermentation.
Finally, Marc then took a look at Immigration and the Food Industry. With: Tim Carman, food writer and critic for the Washington Post; and Maura Judkis, reporter for the Washington Post. The discussion springs from their recent article for the Washington Post, “Restaurants depend on immigrants. Trump’s orders could hit them particularly hard.”

Sound Bites: Maryland Bills on Hunger & Pollution | Afro-Veganism

annapolisFebruary 9, 2017 – Segment 3

In our newest edition of our series on our food and our world, Sound Bites, we begin the hour with important bills introduced in the Maryland General Assembly.

First, joining us to talk about the Community Healthy Air Act is Assateague Coastkeeper Kathy Phillips, Executive Director of Assateague Coastal Trust.

Then Maryland Hunger Solutions’ Director Michael J. Wilson joins us to talk about three anti-hunger bills: The Maryland Cares for Kids Act, The Hunger-Free Schools Act of 2017, and The Maryland Meals for Achievement for Teens Act.

We close the show with a conversation on Afro-veganism. With: Heru, owner of the GruB Factory; and Brenda Sanders, Executive Director of the Better Health Better Life Organization, Co-organizer of The Vegan SoulFest, and one of the Directors of Open the Cages Alliance.

Baltimore Vegan Weekend takes place February 17-19, 2017. You can participate in the Vegan Food Crawl, the Mac ‘n Cheese Smackdown, the Vegan Pizza Fest and more! For more information visit the Facebook page or call 443-219-7971.


SoundBites: Future Harvest & Trump’s EPA

January 26, 2017 – Segment 2

We hosted our newest episode of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world. We begin the episode with Part 2 of a panel Marc moderated two weeks ago at Future Harvest Casa’s 18th Annual Conference, “Cultivate the Chesapeake Foodshed.” The panel was called “Policy Scoper: What’s happening in your state capital?” We discussed what food and agriculture policies are most important to the states of Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia, Delaware and the District of Columbia, and also discussed what food and agriculture policy could look like nationally with the incoming Trump administration. We heard Part 1 of this panel discussion last week. 
The panelists were: Ed Kee, Delaware Secretary of Agriculture; Spencer Moss, Executive Director of West Virginia Food and Farm Coalition; Eric Bendfeldt, Area and Extension Specialist of Community Viability at Virginia Cooperative Extension, Virginia Tech, Virginia State University; Laine Cidlowski, Food Policy Director for the District of Columbia Office of Planning and the District of Columbia Food Policy Council, and Ferd Hoefner, Senior Strategic Advisor for the National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition.
In the second half of SoundBites we had a conversation about Trump’s pick to run the EPA, Scott Pruit, his connection to the Chesapeake Bay, and legislation before the 2017 Maryland General Assembly that could affect water in Maryland. With: Betsy Nicholas, Executive Director of Chesapeake Waterkeepers; and Dean Naujok, Potomac Riverkeeper.

Sound Bites: Future Harvest Cultivate the Chesapeake Foodshed

January 19, 2017 – Segment 3 

We turn to the newest episode of Sound Bites, our series on our food and our world. You will hear the first part of a panel I moderated last week at Future Harvest Casa’s 18th Annual Conference, “Cultivate the Chesapeake Foodshed.” The panel was called “Policy Scoper: What’s happening in your state capital?” We discussed what food and agriculture policies are most important to the states of Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia, Delaware and the District of Columbia, and also discussed what food and agriculture policy could look like nationally with the incoming Trump administration. On Thursday we’ll hear the first part of this panel discussion, and next week we’ll hear the second part.

The panelists were: Ed Kee, Delaware Secretary of Agriculture; Spencer Moss, Executive Director of West Virginia Food and Farm Coalition; Eric Bendfeldt, Area and Extension Specialist of Community Viability at Virginia Cooperative Extension, Virginia Tech, Virginia State University; Laine Cidlowski, Food Policy Director for the District of Columbia Office of Planning and the District of Columbia Food Policy Council, and Ferd Hoefner, Senior Strategic Advisor for the National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition.

Sound Bites: Farming in Baltimore / Agribusiness

January 12, 2017 – Segment 3

Sound Bites documentary recording at the Baltimore Free Farm

The newest episode of our show on on food and our world, Sound Bites. We will be talking food and farming projects in Baltimore, with: Andreas “Spilly” Spiliadis, farmer at Heckle Farm and performer with Baltimore Hoop Love; and Sache Jones, Ambassador for Green for All.
We close the show with a discussion on Agribusiness, with: Lindsay A. Thompson, Executive Director of Delaware-Maryland Agribusiness Association; and Patty Lovera, Assistant Director of Food and Water Watch, who coordinates the food team.

Sound Bites: Future Harvest Conference / Governor Hogan Environmental Plan

January 5, 2017 – Segment 2 

Our newest episode of our series on our food and our world, Sound Bites. We begin with a preview of a very important upcoming event: Future Harvest CASA’s 18th Annual Conference, Cultivate the Chesapeake Foodshed. With: Dena Liebman, Executive Director of Future Harvest CASA; Chris Blanchard, host and producer of the Farmer to Farmer Podcast, a long-form interview show with organic and local market farmers, former owner of Rock Spring Farm in Decorah, Iowa, and former co-Director of the largest organic farming conference in the world, the MOSES Organic Farming Conference in La Crosse, Wisconsin; and Dr. Kris Nichols, Chief Scientist at Rodale Institute, who worked for USDA’s Agricultural Research Service for over 14 years.
If you are interested in food and agriculture, you won’t want to miss Cultivate the Chesapeake Foodshed, Future Harvest CASA’s 18th annual conference! The conference takes place January 12-14 at the College Park Marriott in College Park, Maryland. I’ll be there moderating a panel of farm policy experts from all over the lower mid-Atlantic, including Delaware’s Secretary of Agriculture Ed Kee. 
 
The Future Harvest conference is the largest sustainable farming and food conference in the lower Mid-Atlantic. Farmers, healthy food advocates, and food businesses from all over Maryland, Delaware, Virginia, West Virginia, and DC come to this conference to learn about everything from building soil health, to how to start a craft alcohol business, to ways to stop food waste.
 
There are 48 sessions to choose from, and four keynotes, local food fair, networking sessions, and a local food dinner and lunch. On January 12, there are 10 pre-conference skill-building workshops. Click here for more information and to register. I hope to see you there!!
We close Sound Bites with a look at Governor Larry Hogan’s 2017 Environmental Legislative Agenda, as the Maryland General Assembly opens next Wednesday. With: Maryland State Senator Paul G. Pinsky (D-District 22, Prince George’s County), Vice-Chair of the Education, Health and Environmental Affairs Committee; and State Senator Stephen Waugh (R-District 29, Calvert & St. Mary’s Counties), member of the Education, Health and Environment Committee and Chair of the Republican Senatorial Committee.

Sound Bites: Chesapeake Bay Runoff and Waterwomen of the Chesapeake Bay

oysters

December 29, 2016 – Segment 2

We go back into our archives for the episode of Sound Bites where we discuss the December 2018 Federal government deadline for reducing runoff in the Chesapeake Bay, and steps that are being taken to meet it. We talk with: Scott Dance, who writes about the environment and the weather for The Baltimore Sun; and Carl Simon, Director of Programs at Blue Water Baltimore.
We also host a feature on Waterwomen of the Chesapeake Bay.With: Lydia Woolever, Associate Editor at Baltimore Magazine who wrote the July feature story “Waterwomen,” an in-depth look at a few fearless females who work the Chesapeake Bay themselves and, like their male counterparts, help keep the seafood industry alive; Jill Buck, waterwoman who has been on the water for six years after retiring from a career in childcare and who works as both a traditional waterwoman as well as a practicer of aquaculture; and Rachel Dean, a traditional waterwoman from Solomons Island and part-time high-school English teacher who is involved in waterman’s advocacy, two different fisheries commissions within the Maryland DNR, and Chesapeake Bay heritage tours.

SoundBites: Biggest Food & Agricultural Stories, Statewide Food Charter

Pig Farm (Credit: Mother Jones article by Tom Philpott)December 22, 2016 – Segment 3

We host our newest edition of Sound Bites, our series on our food and our world. We begin the hour with regular Sound Bites commentator Tom Philpott, who will reflect upon some of the biggest food and agriculture stories of 2016. Philpott is the food and agriculture correspondent for Mother Jones.

We also take a close look at the initiative in Maryland to begin a statewide Food Charter, with the Institute for Public Health Innovation.  Our guests will be Christine Bergmark, Project Coordinator of the Maryland Food Charter; and Denzel Mitchell, farmer, educator, food justice advocate and political commentator.


SoundBites: Environmental Justice & Fracking

Fracking Well (Credit: Colorado River Connected)December 15, 2016 – Segment 2

We host for you the newest episode of our series on our food and our world, Sound Bites. Our guests will discuss The Future of the Environmental Justice Movement Under the Trump Administration. With: Brentin Mock, staff writer at CityLab and formerly the justice editor at Grist; and Brittany Shenachie, activist and educator who has been involved with a variety of social movements in the US and the UK, with a primary focus on climate change and environmental justice.

In the last part of our new SoundBites segment we will also hear a report on how fracking produces tons of radioactive waste. With Jie Jenny Zou, reporting fellow for The Center for Public Integrity’s environment and labor team.


Sound Bites: Fracking / John Ikerd

December 1, 2016 – Segment 3 cafo-chickens

For the newest episode of our series about our food and our world, Sound Bites. We begin the hour with our first Countdown to the Annapolis Summit: The Future of Fracking in Maryland. With: Mitch Jones, Senior Policy Advocate at Food and Water Watch; and Drew Cobbs, Executive Director of the Maryland Petroleum Council.
The 14th annual Annapolis Summit will take place on Wednesday, January 11, 7:30-10am, at the Governor Calvert House in Annapolis. I will interview Governor Larry Hogan, Maryland Senate President Mike Miller, and Maryland House Speaker Michael Busch. The Annapolis Summit is in partnership with The Daily Record. For more information and tickets, click here.
For the second half of Sound Bites, we bring you a panel I moderated at the First Baptist Church Family Life and Cultural Center in Salisbury, Maryland. It was called “Industrial CAFOs, Economics, and Public Health in Delmarva” and focused on the question, “How Safe is Your Water?” It was sponsored by Wicomico NAACP and Socially Responsible Agricultural Project. The impetus for the town hall was a proposed poultry operation in Wicomico County that would include up to thirteen chicken houses, each holding 30,000 chickens. The broiler operation would sit on top of the paleochannel, which is the public drinking water source for Salisbury residents. When this was first proposed citizens were left out of the County Council discussions and many were concerned about the health risks posed by these operations. What happened next was unique in the history of the eastern shore, as Black, Latino and White communities came together to convene this town meeting so their voices could be heard and could build a political movement. Go to steinershow.org to hear the full panel. Today, though, we are listening to the keynote address from that panel, which was delivered by Dr. John Ikerd, Professor Emeritus of Agricultural Economics at the University of Missouri.

Sound Bites: Industrial CAFOs, Economics, and Public Health in Delmarva

November 17, 2016 – Segment 1 cafo-chickens

The newest episode of our series on our food and our world, Sound Bites. Listen in to a powerful town hall meeting recorded last week in Salisbury: Industrial CAFOs, Economics, and Public Health in Delmarva. With: Dr. Sacoby Wilson, Assistant Professor with the Maryland Institute for Applied Environmental Health and Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of Maryland-College Park; Michele Merkel, Co-Director of Food and Water Justice at Food and Water Watch; and Dr. Jillian Fry, Project Director for Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health’s Center for a Livable Future and faculty member in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Behavior and Society at the Bloomberg School of Public Health. Dr. John Ikerd, Professor Emeritus of Agricultural Economics at the University of Missouri, gave a keynote address, that we will broadcast on the next episode of Sound Bites.

Sound Bites: YUMM! at the AVAM / Carbon Neutral Fertilizer

November 10, 2016 – Segment 2

We havescreen-shot-2016-11-11-at-10-55-16-am the newest episode of our series on our food and our world, Sound Bites. We begin the hour with a visit to the American Visionary Arts Museum’s exhibit, YUMMM! The History, Fantasy, and Future of Food with Rebecca Hoffberger, the Founder and Director of the American Visionary Art Museum.
Then I talk with two scientists about an important scientific advancement that could pave the way for a potential breakthrough in farming: Carbon-neutral fertilizer production. With: Dr. Katherine A. Brown, Staff Scientist at National Renewable Energy Laboratory; and Dr. Paul King, Staff Scientist and Manager of the Photobiology Group at National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

Sound Bites: Election Coverage

November 3, 2016 – Segment 2 windmills

For the newest episode of Sound Bites, our series on our food and our world. As we approach Election Day, our panel of guests will examine how the results of national, state, and local elections could affect the environment, agriculture, and food policy. With: Mitch Jones, Senior Policy Advocate at Food & Water Watch; and Bob Martin, Food System Policy Program Director for Center for a Livable Future.

Sound Bites: Diversifying the Basket / Maple Syrup / Sour Beef

October 27, 2016 – Segment 2

farmer on his tractor plowing the field, rural wyoming

In the latest episode of our series on our food and our world, Sound Bites. We begin the segment with an important study released last week by Fair Farms Maryland, “Diversifying the Agricultural Basket, Risks in Conventional Poultry Growing on Maryland’s Eastern Shore and Opportunities from Diversified Local Agriculture.” With: Betsy Nicholas, Executive Director of Waterkeepers Chesapeake; Aiden Irish, agricultural and local food systems policy analyst and Ph.D. student in the John Glenn College of Public Affairs at the Ohio State University; and Carole Morrison, transitional farmer who went from producing industrial contract chickens to pasture-raised eggs, at Bird’s Eye View Farm in Pokomoke City.
At 11:30 we bring you two special stories from Maryland Traditions, the Folk Life Program of the Maryland State Arts Council. We begin with a story on Maple Syrup, with Leo Shinholt, Maryland’s Largest Maple Sugar maker and recipient of a Maryland State Heritage Award; and Chad Buterbaugh, co-Director of Maryland Traditions.
We close the show at 11:45 with our second story from Maryland Traditions, about Sour Beef and Dumplings. For this segment our guest host is Steiner Show Senior Producer Mark Gunnery. We talk with: Freddy Hebert, Vice President of the Church Council at the Zion Lutheran Church of the City of Baltimore; and Chad Buterbaugh, co-Director of Maryland Traditions.

Sound Bites: Wenonah Hauter’s Frackopoly

October 20, 2016 – Segment 2frackopoly

We have our newest episode on our food and our world, Sound Bites. This week Wenonah Hauter, Founder and Executive Director of Food & Water Watch, joins us to discuss her new book Frackopoly: The Battle for the Future of Energy and the Environment.

Sound Bites: MD Solar Congress / End-Dependence Day

October 6, 2016 – Segment 2 Baltimore, MD -7/2/14- Denzel Mitchell, of Baltimore, harvests for cucumbers Wednesday afternoon. Mitchell owns operates his farm, "Five Seeds Farm" and provides it's vegetables to local Baltimore restaurants. Rachel Woolf/Baltimore Sun -- #7308

Our newest episode of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world. We begin the hour with a preview of the first Maryland Solar Congress, which takes place Saturday, October 15. With: Corey Ramsden, Program Director for Maryland Solar United Neighborhoods; and Tim Judson from NIRS who will be presenting at the Solar Congress for the “Grid of the Future” workshop.
The Maryland Solar Congress will take place Saturday, October 15, 10am to 2pm, at the Annapolis Friends Meeting House, 351 Dubois Road, Annapolis, MD. Click here for more information.
For our second Sound Bites segment we have preview of another important event taking place next weekend in celebration of World Food Day, which is Sunday, October 16. End-Dependence Day at #WorldFoodDay2016 is hosted by the Black Yield Institute and the Black Church Food Security Network. With: Eric Jackson, Servant-Director of the Black Yield Institute; and the Rev. Dr. Heber Brown III, Founding Director of the Black Church Food Security Network and Orita’s Cross Freedom School, and Pastor of Pleasant Hope Baptist Church.
End-Dependence Day at #WorldFoodDay2016 will take place on Sunday, October 16, 4-7pm, at Pleasant Hope Baptist Church in Baltimore. For more information click here.

Sound Bites: Changes to Perdue’s Chicken Treatment Policies | Fracking & Radioactive Waste | Food Justice in Baltimore

Free-range chickens stand in a pen at an organic-accredited poultry farm in Germany.

September 29, 2016 – Segment 2

We bring a special selection from our Sound Bites archives today.

The show includes a talk with Perdue Farms and others about Perdue’s announcement earlier this week that they are adapting new, more humane, practices regarding the treatment of their chickens. With: Julie DeYoung, spokesperson for Perdue Farms; Ian Kullgren, POLITICO Pro Agriculture reporter; and Scott Edwards, Co-Director of the Food & Water Justice program at Food & Water Watch.

Next we turn to an environmental issue: How fracking produces tons of radioactive waste. With Jie Jenny Zou, reporting fellow for The Center for Public Integrity’s environment and labor team.

We close Sound Bites with a special segment produced by Baltimore Sound Society, asAdam Droneburg and Calvin Perry visit a food justice event at Baltimore’s Lexington Market.


Sound Bites: Bayer and Monsanto | Hip Chick Farms

hipchickSeptember 22, 2016 – Segment 3

In our newest episode of our series on our food and our world, Sound Bites, we begin the hour with a look at Bayer’s takeover of Monsanto. With: Patty Lovera, Assistant Director of Food and Water Watch, where she coordinates their food team; and Bill Freese, science policy analyst at the Center for Food Safety.
We close the show at with a look at a special agricultural operation and sustainable artisanal food production company, Hip Chick Farms. With: Serafina Palandech, Co-Founder and President of Hip Chick Farms, which she runs with her wife Jennifer Johnson, former sous chef at Chez Panisse under organic food pioneer Alice Waters and Executive Chef for the Getty Family.

Sound Bites: Water Rates, Sewage Infrastructure and Death of Bees

FILE - In this Jan. 28, 2014, file photo, a hive of honeybees appears on display at the Vermont Beekeeping Supply booth at the annual Vermont Farm Show at the Champlain Valley Expo in Essex Junction, Vt. The federal government hopes to reverse America's declining honeybee and monarch butterfly populations by making more federal land bee-friendly, spending more money on research and considering the use of less pesticides. (AP Photo/Andy Duback, File)September 15, 2016 – Segment 3

On the newest edition of our series about our food and our world, Sound Bites, we begin the hour with a look at the increase in cost of water bills for Baltimore City residents. With: Mitch Jones, Senior Policy Advocate at Food & Water Watch.
Then we examine Baltimore sewage infrastructure issues and last week’s ruling issued by the United States District Court for the District of Maryland, granting Blue Water Baltimore’s motion to intervene in a federal lawsuit filed in 2002 by Maryland and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency intended to fix the City of Baltimore’s failing sewer system. With: Halle Van der Gaag, Executive Director of Blue Water Baltimore; and David Flores, Baltimore Harbor Waterkeeper.
We close the show at 11:40 with the tragic death of bees that is being brought about by spraying for the Zika virus. With: Bonnie Raindrop, Legislative Chair of the Central Maryland Beekeepers Association.

Sound Bites: Sperm Whales / Urban Farming

September 8, 2016 – Segment 3urban-farm

A special rebroadcast of Sound Bites – our series about our food, our environment, and our world – listen in to a fascinating discussion on the language of Sperm Whales, as I talk with author and journalist James Nestor. His new book isDEEP: Freediving, Renegade Science, and What The Ocean Tells Us About Ourselves, and was featured in the The New York Times and Annapurna Pictures virtual-reality film, “The Click Effect.”
We close out Sound Bites with a visit to the urban garden at Frederick Douglass High School in Baltimore. Previously we discussed US Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack’s visit to Douglass to see their urban garden and examine the role of urban agriculture in education. The current episode features an interview in which formerSteiner Show Senior Producer Stefanie Mavronis and I visited Douglass to talk to the two teachers who started the project – Amanda Briody and Chris Jennings – and hear from four of the Douglass Freshman students currently involved in the program: La’Asia Howard, Dominic Scruggs, Nykerra Williams, and Maleke Smalls.

Sound Bites: Pollution and Urban Foraging

yesSeptember 1, 2016 – Segment 2

It’s the latest episode of our series on our food and our world, Sound Bites. This week we discuss the news that the State of Maryland reached a settlement with NRG Energy, the owner of two Maryland power plants that have been discharging wastewater with illegal amounts of nitrogen and phosphorous into the Potomac and Patuxent Rivers. NRG has been ordered to pay $1 million to settle, and to invest a total of $10 million in upgrading their wastewater filtration systems to reduce future pollution. With: Phillip Musegaas, Legal Director for Potomac Riverkeeper Network; Maryland Attorney General Brian Frosh; and Frederick Tutman, Patuxent Riverkeeper.

Then writer Jasleena Grewal, contributor to YES! Magazine and Brown Girl Magazine, joins us to discuss a piece she wrote for the current issue of Yes! Magazine called Urban Foraging: Weeds You Can Eat.

We close the show with guest host Mark Gunnery, Senior Producer for the Marc Steiner Show, talking with Baltimore Sun reporter Scott Dance about the state of Maryland’s waterways. Topics will include: recent reports that bodies of water around the state contain dangerous levels of fecal matter; news that amphetamine traces have been found in the Gwynns Falls; and this summer’s dead zones in the Chesapeake Bay. Dance writes about the environment and weather for the Baltimore Sun.


Sound Bites: Tha Flower Factory / Young Farmers / Dr. Margaret Gray

August 25, 2016 – Segment 3 12885807_688669934607507_1249625991172461393_o

Our guest host for Sound Bites is Denzel Mitchell, educator and former owner of Five Seeds Farm and Apiary in Baltimore.
The hour begins with an interview with farmer Walker Marsh, founder and owner of Tha Flower Factory, on their work and their Kickstarter campaign.
Then we have our Young Farmers Roundtable, with: Walker Marsh, Founder & Owner of Tha Flower Factory; Jason James, co-owner of Moon Valley Farm; and Kristen Carbone of Radix Farm.
We close out the show with an interview with Dr. Margaret Gray on her article for Jacobin, The Dark Side of Local: There’s nothing ethical about “buying local” and supporting small farms when the workers on them are brutally exploited. Dr. Gray is an Associate Professor of Political Science, Adelphi University and author of Labor and the Locavore: The Making of a Comprehensive Food Ethic.

Sound Bites: The 300 Pound Vegan and a Seasonal Recipe

vegansoulfestAugust 18, 2016 – Segment 4

We have our weekly installment of Sound Bites. The first segment of Sound Bites will have a guest host Denzel Mitchell, a Baltimore City resident, educator and farmer. Denzel speaks with Brenda Sanders, Executive Director of the Better Health Better Life organization and co-director of the Vegan Soulfest, Greg Brown, Co-owner and founder of Land of Kush, and David Carter, former NFL player Food justice and animal rights activist. The Vegan Soulfest is Saturday, August 20 at BCCC (2901 Liberty Heights Avenue) from 12pm-7:00pm. Then we close the show with a conversation with Willie Flowers. 


Sound Bites: Vegan SoulFest / Clean Energy Jobs Act

August 11, 2016 – Segment 2 Vegan Soulfest

We have the latest episode of our series on our food and our world, Sound Bites. We begin the hour with a preview of the third annual Vegan Soul Fest! With: Brenda Sanders, Co-organizer of the Vegan Soul Fest, Executive Director of the Better Health Better Life organization, and one of the Directors of Open the Cages Alliance; Naijha Wright, Co-organizer of the Vegan Soul Fest, Co-owner of Land of Kush restaurant, and Executive Director of the Black Vegetarian Society of Maryland.
The third annual Vegan Soul Fest is happening Saturday, Aug. 20 from noon to 7 p.m. on the BCCC Liberty campus, 2901 Liberty Heights Ave. in Baltimore. For more information about the festival, VeganSoulFest.com.
Then we close the show at 11:40 with a segment on Air Quality Issues, Code Orange Days, and Governor Hogan’s veto of the Clean Energy Jobs Act. With: Tiffany Hartung, Manager of the Maryland Climate Coalition; and Maryland pediatrician Dr. Maria Brown.

Sound Bites: Baltimore Ecosystem Study

Screen-Shot-2016-03-03-at-3.39.42-PMAugust 4, 2016 – Segment 2

In our latest edition of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world, we speak with participants from the Baltimore Ecosystem Study, a consortium of long-term research projects examining Baltimore’s ecosystem. We check in with:
  • Helen Glazer, 2014-2015 Baltimore Ecosystem Study Artist-in-Residence, whose project is an exhibition of prints, panoramic photographs and digitally-fabricated sculpture, concentrated on the Gwynns Falls watershed (see her work at helenglazer.com);
  • Dr. J. Morgan Grove, Scientist and Team Leader for the Forest Service at the Northern Research Station;
  • Dr. Shannon LaDeau, Associate Scientist of Disease Ecology at the Baltimore Ecosystem Study and The Cary Institute; and
  • Dr. Chris Swan, Professor in the Department of Geography & Environmental Systems at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County.

Sound Bites: Oyster Wars, When It Comes To Food, & The Air-Conditioned World

Oyster (Credit: Baltimore Sun)July 28, 2016 – Segment 2

We host our newest episode of our series on our food and our world: Sound Bites! We with a look at a recent article in the Baltimore Sun, “Oyster wars: Watermen aim to take back oyster bars as state panel reviews shellfish sanctuaries.” With: Kelton Clark, a Maryland Oyster Advisory Commission member and Director of Morgan State University’s Patuxent Environmental and Aquatic Research Laboratory; and Peyton Robertson, Director of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Chesapeake Bay Office.

We then learn “The One Thing Hillary Cares About Most –When It Comes to Food,” with Tom Philpott who wrote an article with that title for Mother Jones. Philpott is Mother Jones food and agriculture reporter and co-founder of Maverick Farms in North Carolina.

Finally, we take a look at how our air-conditioned world is affecting climate change. With Katie Herzog, staff writer at the environmental news site Grist.org, who wrote the article “How air-conditioning made America – and how it could break us all.”


Sound Bites: Controversy Over GMO Labeling | What A Fish Knows | Recipe: Seasonal Salad By Colette

What A Fish KnowsJuly 21, 2016 – Segment 3

On the newest episode of Sound Bites, our series on our food and our world. We begin the hour with a look at the controversy over the GMO Labeling bill that passed through Congress and is awaiting signature by President Obama. With Patty Lovera, Assistant Director of Food & Water Watch, where she coordinates the food team.
Then, we look at what a fish knows – literally! – with Dr. Jonathan Balcombe, author of the new book What A Fish Knows: The Inner Lives of Our Underwater Cousins. Dr. Balcombe is Director of Animal Sentience with the U.S. Humane Society Institute for Science and Policy in Washington, DC.
We close the hour with a special recipe: A Seasonal Salad with Stefano Porcile, Executive Chef at Colette in Baltimore’s Station North.

Sound Bites: Reducing Runoff In Baltimore By December 2018 | The Waterwomen Of The Chesapeake Bay

Screen Shot 2016-07-14 at 12.49.42 PMJuly 14, 2016 – Segment 2

We have two segments on the December 2018 Federal government deadline for reducing runoff in the Chesapeake Bay, and steps that are being taken to meet it. We talk with: Scott Dance, who writes about the environment and the weather for The Baltimore Sun; and Carl Simon, Director of Programs at Blue Water Baltimore.
We close the show at 11:30 with a feature on Waterwomen of the Chesapeake Bay.With: Lydia Woolever, Associate Editor at Baltimore Magazine who wrote the July feature story “Waterwomen,” an in-depth look at a few fearless females who work the Chesapeake Bay themselves and, like their male counterparts, help keep the seafood industry alive; Jill Buck, waterwoman who has been on the water for six years after retiring from a career in childcare and who works as both a traditional waterwoman as well as a practicer of aquaculture; and Rachel Dean, a traditional waterwoman from Solomons Island and part-time high-school English teacher who is involved in waterman’s advocacy, two different fisheries commissions within the Maryland DNR, and Chesapeake Bay heritage tours.

Sound Bites: Michael Pollen’s ‘In Defense Of Food’ & Student Access To Healthy Foods

Crossroads Community food Network (Credit: Crossroads Community food Network website)July 7, 2016 – Segment 2

We host our newest episode of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world. This week features a panel discussion I moderated last week at Busboys and Poets in Hyattsville. It was part of the Focus In! Film series, sponsored by Fair Farms and Crossroads Community Food Network. The evening began with a screening of the film “In Defense of Food,” featuring Michael Pollan, author of a number of books including The Omnivore’s Dilemma, and The Botany of Desire. The film centers around one of the most basic human questions “What should I eat?” According to Pollan, much of our food has been replaced by nutrients and food-like substances instead of real food.

The film was followed by a discussion on topics including the Prince George’s County Farm to School Program; school gardens; students learning about health, eating and food; healthy access to food in communities; food school system uses; and sourcing local food.

The panel included:

Betsy Nicholas, Executive Director of Fair Farms
Christie Balch, Executive Director of Crossroads Community Food Network
The Hon. Danielle Glaros, Prince George’s County Council
The Hon. Shani Warner, Hyattsville City Council
Ellarose Preston, Hyattsville Farm Market Manager, City of Hyattsville
Sara Booker, Maryland State Department of Education, Office of School Nutrition
Margaret Morgan Hubbard, Eco City Farms
Sydney Daigle, Prince George’s County Food Equity Council


Sound Bites: Changes to Perdue’s Chicken Treatment Policies | Fracking & Radioactive Waste | Food Justice in Baltimore

Abusing the chickens we eatJune 30, 2016 – Segment 3

It’s our newest episode of our series on our food and our world, Sound Bites! Today’s show includes a talk with Perdue Farms and others about Perdue’s announcement earlier this week that they are adapting new, more humane, practices regarding the treatment of their chickens. With: Julie DeYoung, spokesperson for Perdue Farms; Ian Kullgren, POLITICO Pro Agriculture reporter; and Scott Edwards, Co-Director of the Food & Water Justice program at Food & Water Watch.

Next we turn to an environmental issue: How fracking produces tons of radioactive waste. With Jie Jenny Zou, reporting fellow for The Center for Public Integrity’s environment and labor team.

We close Sound Bites with a special segment produced by Baltimore Sound Society, as Adam Droneburg and Calvin Perry visit a food justice event at Baltimore’s Lexington Market.


Sound Bites: Town Hall on Industrial Poultry Production on the Eastern Shore, Part 2/2

CAFOsJune 9, 2016 – Segment 3

On our newest episode about our food and our world, Sound Bites. You will hear the broadcast of Part 2 of a town hall I moderated a few weeks ago in Salisbury on the Eastern Shore. The impetus for the town hall was a proposed poultry operation in Wicomico Country that would include up to thirteen chicken houses, each holding 30,000 chickens. The broiler operation would sit on top of the paleochannel, which is the public drinking water source for Salisbury residents. When this was first proposed citizens were left out of the County Council discussions and many were concerned about the health risks posed by these operations. What happened next was unique in the history of the Eastern Shore, as Black, Latino and White communities came together to convene this town meeting to let their voices be heard and to build a political movement.
The panel theme of this panel was “Health” and we looked at the expansion of industrial scale poultry Confined Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) and discussed the impact on community health and safety that expansion is having or could have. We’re joined by public health experts who shared their perspectives on how zoning policy could be changed to protect public health and address community questions related to the density and intensity of industrial poultry CAFO expansion on the lower Eastern Shore. It was sponsored by The Concerned Citizens Against Industrial CAFOs (CCAIC), the Wicomico County Branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (WCNAACP), the Circle of Leaders (COL) and other concerned citizens of the lower Eastern Shore.
The panelists were:
  • Michelle Merkel, Co-Director, Food & Water Justice Food & Water Watch;
  • Frederick Tutman, Patuxent Riverkeeper and Farming Representative for the Patuxent River Commission;
  • Maria Payan, Consultant for Socially Responsible Agricultural Project;
  • Craig Watts, former contracted poultry grower; and
  • Dr. Jillian Fry, Director of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health’s Center for a Livable Future’s Public Health & Sustainable Aquaculture Project.

Sound Bites: Town Hall on Industrial Poultry Production on the Eastern Shore, Part 1/2

chickenJune 2, 2016 – Segment 3

It’s our newest episode about our food and our world, Sound Bites. We hear a broadcast of a town hall Marc moderated a couple weeks ago in Salisbury on the Eastern Shore. The impetus for the town hall was a proposed poultry operation in Wicomico Country that would include up to thirteen chicken houses, each holding 30,000 chickens. The broiler operation would sit on top of the paleochannel, which is the public drinking water source for Salisbury residents. When this was first proposed citizens were left out of the County Council discussions and many were concerned about the health risks posed by these operations. What happened next was unique in the history of the Eastern Shore, as Black, Latino and White communities came together to convene this town meeting to let their voices be heard and to build a political movement.
The panel theme of this panel was “Health” and we looked at the expansion of industrial scale poultry Confined Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) and discussed the impact on community health and safety that expansion is having or could have. We’re joined by public health experts who shared their perspectives on how zoning policy could be changed to protect public health and address community questions related to the density and intensity of industrial poultry CAFO expansion on the lower Eastern Shore. It was sponsored by The Concerned Citizens Against Industrial CAFOs (CCAIC), the Wicomico County Branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (WCNAACP), the Circle of Leaders (COL) and other concerned citizens of the lower Eastern Shore.
The panelists are:
  • Michelle Merkel, Co-Director, Food & Water Justice, Food & Water Watch;
  • Frederick Tutman, Patuxent Riverkeeper and Farming Representative for the Patuxent River Commission;
  • Maria Payan, Consultant for Socially Responsible Agricultural Project;
  • Craig Watts, former contracted poultry grower; and
  • Dr. Jillian Fry, Director of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health’s Center for a Livable Future’s Public Health & Sustainable Aquaculture Project

Sound Bites: A Visit To Black Dirt Farm On The Eastern Shore| Carbon-Neutral Fertilizer | Recipe: Mussels With Colette’s Stefano Porcile

Black Dirt Farm in Preston, MDMay 26, 2016 – Segment 3

For the newest episode of Sound Bites, our series on food, agriculture, the environment, and our future. Steiner Show Senior Producers Stefanie Mavronis and Mark Gunnery visit Black Dirt Farm in Preston, Maryland, where they talk with co-owner and co-operator Blain Snipstal.

Then I talk with two scientists about an important scientific advancement that could pave the way for a potential breakthrough in farming: Carbon-neutral fertilizer production. With: Dr. Katherine A. Brown, Staff Scientist at National Renewable Energy Laboratory; and Dr. Paul King, Staff Scientist and Manager of the Photobiology Group at National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

We close the show with a mouth-watering recipe for mussels from local chef Stefano Porcile, Executive Chef at Colette restaurant in Baltimore.


Sound Bites: The Language Of Sperm Whales | A Visit To The Urban Garden At Douglass High School In Baltimore

Douglass High School in BaltimoreMay 19, 2016 – Segment 3

On the newest edition of Sound Bites – our series about our food, our environment, and our world – listen to a fascinating discussion on the language of Sperm Whales, as I talk with author and journalist James Nestor. His new book isDEEP: Freediving, Renegade Science, and What The Ocean Tells Us About Ourselves, and was featured in the The New York Times and Annapurna Pictures virtual-reality film, “The Click Effect.”
We close out the show with a visit to the urban garden at Frederick Douglass High School in Baltimore. Two weeks ago we discussed US Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack’s visit to Douglass to see their urban garden and discuss the role of urban agriculture in education. Last week, Steiner Show Senior Producer Stefanie Mavronis and I visited Douglass to talk to the two teachers who started the project — Amanda Briody and Chris Jennings – and hear from four of the Douglass Freshman students currently involved in the program: La’Asia Howard, Dominic Scruggs, Nykerra Williams, and Maleke Smalls.

Sound Bites: Health Of The Inner Harbor | Is The Hogan Administration Being Easy On Polluters? | Urban Farming & Health Initiatives In Baltimore’s Park Heights Community

Hogan (Credit: Baltimore Sun)May 12, 2016 – Segment 3

We host a brand new episode of Sound Bites, our weekly segment where we analyze important issues concerning food, agriculture, and the environment. Our guests will talk about the health of the Chesapeake Bay and consider whether Governor Larry Hogan’s administration is being strict enough about pollution in the Bay. With: Scott Dance, who writes about the environment and the weather at The Baltimore Sun; and Rena Steinzor, professor at the University of Maryland Carey School of Law and a founder of the Center for Progressive Reform.

We also talk with Willie Flowers, Executive Director of the Park Heights Community Health Alliance, about urban farming and health initiatives in the Park Heights community of Baltimore.


Sound Bites: Urban Agriculture In Baltimore Schools | Chef Egg’s Interactive Cooking Programs

Fredrick Douglas Highschool (Credit: Afro.com)May 5, 2016 – Segment 3

We host our newest episode of Sound Bites, our series about our food, our environment and our world. We’ll talk about a new youth urban agriculture initiative at Frederick Douglass High School in West Baltimore, part of an urban farming initiative with the USDA. You’ll hear from: Amanda Briody, teacher at Frederick Douglass High School; Abby Cocke, Environmental Planner at the Baltimore City Office of Sustainability; and Allison Boyd, Director of the Farm Alliance of Baltimore.

 Also joining us is Chef Erik Berlin, aka Chef Egg, a local chef, culinary instructor and host of Chef Egg’s Cooking Eggsperience and Chef Egg Live/Hands On Chef Egg – interactive cooking programs. Chef Egg teaches cooking to youth and veterans.

Sound Bites: Young Baltimore Activist Wins Goldman Environmental Prize | America’s Wasteful Obsession With Bottled Water | Recipe: Spaghetti Aglio e Olio

Destiny Watford (Credit: Inhabitat)April 28, 2016 – Segment 2

We host our newest edition of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world. We begin the hour with an interview with Destiny Watford, a young activist from Baltimore who won the Goldman Prize, the world’s largest award recognizing grassroots environmental activists, for her work to stop plans to build the Fairfield incinerator – the nation’s largest incinerator – less than a mile away from her high school.

We examine America’s growing obsession with bottled water. With: Roberto Ferdman, journalist who covers food and economics for The Washington PostChristopher Hogan, IOM Vice President of Communications for the International Bottled Water Association; and Emily Wurth, Water Program Director for Food and Water Watch.

Sound Bites with a recipe for a simple and refreshing take on pasta: spaghetti aglio e olio, from culinary aficionado Sam Levin. 


Sound Bites: How Environmental Legislation Fared In The 2016 Maryland General Assembly | Pollinator Protection In MD | New Baltimore City Sustainability Plan | Recipe: Passover With Michael Twitty

General Assembly (credit: Politicalmaryland)April 21, 2016 – Segment 2

We host a segment from Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world, we take a look at how agricultural and environmental legislation fared in the 2016 Maryland General Assembly. With Tim Wheeler, Managing Editor and Project Writer for Chesapeake Bay Journal.

We examine more closely one of those pieces of legislation, the Pollinator Protection Act of 2016, as Maryland could become the first state to pass restrictions on consumer use of neonicotinoids, the pesticides implicated in bee population declines. (The bill passed through the General Assembly and is waiting for signature by Governor Larry Hogan.) With: Bonnie Raindrop, Legislative Chair of the Central Maryland Beekeepers Association.

We check in with the Baltimore Office of Sustainability about the new city-wide sustainability plan. With: Kristin Baja, Climate and Resilience Planner and Floodplain Manager for the Baltimore Office of Sustainability; and Earl Johnson, Executive Director of Come Home Baltimore Foundation.

Passover begins Saturday at sundown, so we bring you a special Passover recipe from Michael Twitty, culinary historian of African and African American foodways, blogger at Afroculinaria, and recent TED fellow.


Sound Bites: The Color Of Food | How Race & Agriculture Intersect

The Color of FoodApril 7, 2016 – Segment 3

On Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world, we are joined by Natasha Bowens. Bowens is a beginning farmer and community grower in Western Maryland, who wrote the book The Color of Food: Stories of Race, Resilience and Farming.

Then, we hear from Denzel Mitchell, formerly of Five Seeds Farm and Apiary in Baltimore, as he and Bowens talk about the ways that race intersects with agriculture and our food movement.

This episode is a rebroadcast from August 2015.


Sound Bites: Fairfield Incinerator Permit Expires | Phosphorus Regulation In Maryland | Food Educator Jennifer Crisp

Baltimore Fairfield IncineratorMarch 31, 2016 – Segment 2

On our newest episode of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world, we begin with a follow-up to previous episodes about the proposed Fairfield Incinerator in Curtis Bay. The permit for the project was ruled expired this month by the Maryland Department of the Environment. With: James Strong, Sub-District Director for United Steelworkers District 8; and Leah Kelly, attorney with the Environmental Integrity Project.
Then, we talk with Jeremy Cox, Business Reporter from Delmarva Now, about Maryland Department of Agriculture’s announcement earlier this month that, based on statewide soil test information, some 82% of farm fields will not be impacted by new environmental regulations potentially limiting phosphorus application or the use of animal manure as a fertilizer.
We close out the show with food educator and documentary producer Jennifer Crisp. Crisp joins us to talk about new projects focusing on food and education. She produced Giobbi, a documentary about  a chef who finally gets to meet her 89 year old mentor: Artist, chef, cookbook author, gardener and winemaker Edward Giobbi. Crisp also teaches a seed-to-table program in Baltimore City Public Schools.

Sound Bites: Impact Of Sewage Pollution In Baltimore’s Harbor | Detroit Black Community Food Security Network | Recipe: Palestinian Easter Kaik With Dates

Baltimore Harbor (Photo Credit: Forsaken Fotos via Flickr)March 24, 2016 – Hour 2

For our newest edition of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world.  We begin the hour with an update on the state of sewage pollution in the Baltimore Harbor. Baltimore’s Department of Public Works (DPW) estimated that 12.6 million gallons of wastewater were dumped into the harbor last month following a storm. With: David Flores, Baltimore Harbor Waterkeeper, Blue Water Baltimore.
Then, we talk with Malik Yakini, Executive Director of the Detroit Black Community Food Security Network and founder of D-Town Farm, an urban farm in Detroit. We discuss racism in the food system and the food movement, as well as Yakini’s work for social justice, food equity, and food security for the people of Detroit.
We close out Sound Bites with a special Palestinian Easter Recipe. Laila El-Haddad, co-author of The Gaza Kitchen: A Palestinian Culinary Journey, shares a traditional Palestinian Easter recipe, kaik with dates.

Sound Bites: Sandtown–Building a Model for Food and Jobs

Sandtown-WinchesterMarch 17, 2016 – Segment 3

In a special archive edition of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world, we hear a rebroadcast of a Good Food Gathering town hall meeting held last summer in partnership with Hopkins’ Baltimore Food and Faith Project, titled Sandtown: Building a Model for Food and Jobs. The town hall took place at Jubilee Arts, located in the Sandtown Winchester neighborhood of Baltimore, which was at the center of the Baltimore Uprising and was the neighborhood where Freddie Gray lived and was arrested.
The panel was comprised of three members of the faith community who are working on food and employment issues in interesting and effective ways: Elder C.W. Harrisof Strength to Love II Farm and Newborn Holistic Ministries; Antoine Bennet of New Song Community Church; and Melissa Kelly of the No Boundaries Coalition.

Sound Bites: Institutional Food Procurement | SCOTUS and Chesapeake Bay | A Vegan Poem

bayMarch 10, 2016 – Segment 3

On our newest edition of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world, we begin the with a look at one of the key issues for systemic change in the sustainability of our food system: Institutional Food Procurement and Recommendations for Improvement. We look at a report with the same name written by the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future. With: Raychel Santo, Program Coordinator, Food Communities and Public Health at the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future, Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Then we turn to the Chesapeake Bay, with a look at the U.S. Supreme Court decision last week to decline to hear a challenge to the Chesapeake Bay Cleanup Plan, by the American Farm Bureau Federation. With: Darryl Fears, reporter for The Washington Post, where he covers the environment with a focus on the Chesapeake Bay and wildlife; Tim Wheeler, Managing Editor and Project Writer for Chesapeake Bay Journal; and Jon Mueller, Chesapeake Bay Foundation VP of litigation and lead person on that court case.
We close out the show with a poem, A Vegan Change of Heart, by the son of a farmer who speaks from his heart about his decision to stop eating animal products.

Sound Bites: Baltimore Ecosystem Study

photo by Helen GlazerMarch 3, 2016 – Segment 2

In our latest edition of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world, we speak with participants from the Baltimore Ecosystem Study, a consortium of long-term research projects examining Baltimore’s ecosystem. We check in with:
  • Helen Glazer, 2014-2015 Baltimore Ecosystem Study Artist-in-Residence, whose project is an exhibition of prints, panoramic photographs and digitally-fabricated sculpture, concentrated on the Gwynns Falls watershed (see her work at helenglazer.com);
  • Dr. J. Morgan Grove, Scientist and Team Leader for the Forest Service at the Northern Research Station;
  • Dr. Shannon LaDeau, Associate Scientist of Disease Ecology at the Baltimore Ecosystem Study and The Cary Institute; and
  • Dr. Chris Swan, Professor in the Department of Geography & Environmental Systems at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County.

Sound Bites: Afroculinaria’s Michael Twitty | Building The Black Yield Institute For Black Food Sovereignty

Michael Twitty (Photo Credit: Afroculinaria)February 25, 2016 – Hour 2

On our newest edition of Sound Bites – our series about our food and our world – we begin the hour with my conversation with Michael Twitty, culinary historian of African and African American foodways, blogger at Afroculinaria, and recent TED fellow.
We close the show with Eric Jackson, Servant-Director of the Black Yield Institute, who tells us about Black food sovereignty. Black Yield Institute is an Action Network of Black people and entities that serve to catalyze action in the pursuit of Black food sovereignty in Black and poor Baltimore. The aim of Black Yield Institute is the pursuit of a united Black community in the process of building power through cooperative economics, social and cultural affirmation, political action and collective wellness practices.

Sound Bites: Backlash Against Chicken House Construction | Labor Conditions in Poultry Plants | Recipe: Catalina Byrd

ChickenFebruary 18, 2016 – Segment 2

On our newest episode of our series about our food and our world, Sound Bites, we continue our coverage of the community organizing happening on the Eastern Shore against expansion of the poultry industry. We will talk with Jeremy Cox, reporter for The Daily Times of Salisbury, about his recent article, “Backyard backlash: How Delmarva turned against poultry.”
Then we shine a light on the treatment of workers in the poultry industry, from an Oxfam report, Lives on the Line: The High Human Cost of Chicken. With Minor Sinclair, Director of the U.S. regional office of Oxfam America; and C. Shawn Boehringer, Chief Counsel of Maryland Legal Aid. Sinclair and Boehringer co-authored an article in last week’s Baltimore Sun, “Poultry processing, a thankless job.”
We close Sound Bites with a special recipe from media consultant and political strategist Catalina Byrd, who will be the featured artist and guest chef this Sunday, February 21 at NANCY by SNAC’s Sunday Breakfast with the Artists.

Sound Bites: United Nations Comments On Curtis Bay Incinerator | Salisbury Teacher On Protecting Perdue’s Chickens

chickenFebruary 11, 2016 – Segment 3

On our newest edition of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world, we begin the hour with a look at the health implications of the proposed Curtis Bay Incinerator. With: Tim Whitehouse, Executive Director of the Chesapeake Physicians for Social Responsibility, former head of the Law and Policy Program at the Commission for Environmental Cooperation in Montreal, and former senior attorney at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in Washington, D.C.; and Dr. Gwen DuBois, Secretary of the Chesapeake Physicians for Social Responsibility Board of Directors, instructor in Medicine at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and a member of the Public Health Committee of the Maryland State Medical Society.
Last week’s statement issued by United Nations’ Working Group of Experts on People of African Descent stated: “The highest polluting industrial facilities, across a range of sectors from farming, mining to manufacturing, are more likely to be situated in poor and minority neighbourhood, including those of people of African descent. For instance, we are concerned about the possible health risks to people of African descent on account of the incinerator project in Curtis Bay, Baltimore and the lead contaminated water in Flint, Michigan. African American communities are calling for environmental justice as they are concerned that they are disproportionately exposed to environmental hazards impacting their health and standard of living.”
We close the show with a discussion with Jane Langrall Robinson, a middle-school teacher and animal advocate in Salisbury, Maryland, who caught our eye with her op-ed in the Baltimore Sun last month: Protecting Perdue’s chickens.

Sound Bites: “If There Are No New Farmers, Who Will Grow Our Food?”

Kim EckartFebruary 4, 2016 – Segment 2

Today on Sound Bites, we meet with Kim Eckarta Seattle-based writer and associate editor at Yes! magazine.  She wrote an article called, “If There Are No New Farmers, Who Will Grow Our Food?” for How to Create a Culture of Good Health, the Winter 2016 issue of YES! Magazine.

We are then joined by young farmers Walker Marsh, Founder & Owner of The Flower Factory; Isabel Antreasian, Project Manager for Whitelock Community Farm; Sache Jones, Food Justice Consultant for Park Heights Community Health Alliance and Manager of the AFYA Community Teaching Garden in Park Heights; and Charlotte Keniston, current Open Society Institute fellow, working with Paul’s Place on community-led interventions to address food accessibility in the Pigtown neighborhood of Baltimore.


Sound Bites: Community Impacts of Industrial Poultry Operations On The Eastern Shore

Photo Credit: Citizens for a Better Eastern ShoreJanuary 28, 2016 – Hour 2

On our newest edition of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world, we look at Community Impacts of Industrial Poultry Operations. Last week I took a trip to Exmore, Virginia, a small town south of Chincoteague on Virginia’s Eastern Shore, where I moderated a forum for the Citizens for a Better Eastern Shore, exploring community impacts of industrial poultry operations — including the construction of poultry houses and the spreading of poultry litter on fields — at the Broadwater Academy. Just as communities on Maryland’s Eastern Shore are beginning to organize against the mass expansion of industrial poultry farming, communities in Virginia are beginning to do the same.
The panelists included:
  • Mark Brush, Associate Professor of Marine Science at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science;
  • Jillian Fry of the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health;
  • Carole Morrison, former Industrial Poultry grower, now small-scale farm grower;
  • Roger Everton and Neil Zahradka of the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality; and
  • Maria Payan, Consultant, Socially Responsible Agricultural Project.

This broadcast was edited for time. To hear the full, unedited audio from this town hall forum click here


Sound Bites: Maryland Legislators Debate Poultry Litter & Farmer’s Rights | What Are Food Policy Councils?

ChickenJanuary 21, 2016 – Segment 2

On Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world, our first group of guests reflects upon two agricultural issues before the Maryland General Assembly: The Poultry Litter Management Act and the Farmer’s Rights Act. With:Betsy Nicholas, Co-chair of Maryland Clean Agriculture Coalition and Executive Director of Waterkeepers Chesapeake; Doug R. Myers, Maryland Senior Scientist at the Chesapeake Bay Foundation; Mitch Jones, Senior Policy Advocate for Food and Water Watch; and Valerie Connelly, Executive Director for the Maryland Farm Bureau.
We close the show with a look at Food Policy Councils – what they are, and why they are important. With: Anne Palmer, Program Director at Center for a Livable Future at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Sound Bites: How We Define Organic Food | When Cultural Food Becomes Trendy

Urban Farm (Credit: Grid Philly)January 14, 2015 – Segment 3

We play the latest episode of our series on our food and our world, Sound Bites. First we look at the definitions of organic food with Steve Savage, blogger and Agricultural Technology consultant; and Jay Martin, farmer at Provident Organic Farm.

We then have an interview with Ruth Tam, Web Producer of The Kojo Nnamdi Show and contributor to She the People, about her article for the Washington Post: “How it feels when white people shame your culture’s food – then make it trendy.”


Sound Bites: Environment & Upcoming Legislative Session | Remembering Life & Work of Cultural Anthropologist Sidney Mintz

5640847994_02bfcd008e_nJanuary 7, 2016 – Segment 2

Today during the newest edition of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world, we begin with a look at environmental legislation that will be addressed in the 2016 Maryland General Assembly, in our Countdown to the Annapolis Summit. Joining us will be  Dru Schmidt-Perkins, President of 1000 Friends of Maryland; and Mitch Jones, Senior Policy Advocate at Food and Water Watch.
We close out Sound Bites with a special tribute to the life and work of renowned cultural anthropologist Dr. Sidney Mintz, known as the Father of Food Anthropology. Mr. Mintz died on December 27, 2015 at the age of 93. Celebrating his life and work is Sarah Hill, Associate Professor of Environmental and Sustainability Studies at Western Michigan University and author of the Boston Review article “The Sweet Life of Sidney Mintz;” Kevin A. Yelvington, Professor of Anthropology at the University of South Florida; Richard Wilk, Distinguished Professor of Anthropology at Indiana University and Jane Guyer, George Armstrong Kelly Professor of Anthropology at Johns Hopkins University.

 


Sound Bites: Building a Model for Food and Jobs in Sandtown-Winchester

Sandtown-WinchesterDecember 31, 2015 – Segment 2

It’s another episode of our series on our food and our world, Sound Bites. This week we bring you the first part of our Good Food Gathering town hall meeting held June 16 in partnership with Hopkins’ Baltimore Food and Faith Project, titled Sandtown: Building a Model for Food and Jobs. The town hall took place at Jubilee Arts, located in the Sandtown Winchester neighborhood of Baltimore, which was at the center of the Baltimore Uprising and was the neighborhood where Freddie Gray lived and was arrested.

The panel was comprised of three members of the faith community who are working on food and employment issues in interesting and effective ways: Elder C.W. Harris of Strength to Love II Farm and Newborn Holistic Ministries; Antoine Bennet of New Song Community Church; and Melissa Kelly of the No Boundaries Coalition.

This segment originally aired in June 2015.


Sound Bites: Fairfield Incinerator Protest Ends In Arrests | Environmental Justice In Maryland

Incinerator Protest (Credit: Nicole King)December 17, 2015 – Segment 2

On our newest edition about our series about food and our world, Sound Bites, we check in on a protest against the proposed Fairfield trash incinerator in South Baltimore. Joining us will be Destiny Waterford, leader with Free Your Voice and United Workers and junior at Towson University; Gregg Sawtell, leadership organizers for United Workers, Josh Acevedo from Free Your Voice who was arrested for protesting, Crystal Hall from Free Your Voice, also arrested for protesting  and Nell Seldman, President of the Institute for Local Self Reliance.

And, we talk with Dr. Matthew Peters, Staff Attorney, for the University of Maryland Environmental Law Clinic.  The Environmental Law Clinic is the largest public interest environmental law firm in the State of Maryland devoted to providing free legal services to support environmental litigation and legal reform that protects the Chesapeake Bay Watershed.


Sound Bites: Fairfield Incinerator | The Chesapeake Bay and Agricultural Pollution

22273513619_971f780b59_nDecember 10, 2015 – Segment 3

On our newest edition of Sound Bites, our series on food and our world, we begin with an update on the status of the Fairfield incinerator project. We will also share information on an upcoming action around the project on December 15, 2015. Joining us will be Greg Sawtell, Leadership Organizer, United Workers; and Destiny Watford, a leader with Free Your Voice and United Workers, and junior at Towson University.

There will be an action at the Maryland Department of the Environment on December 15, 2015http://www.unitedworkers.org/events
We then look at a report commissioned by the Abell Foundation, The Chesapeake Bay and Agricultural Pollution: The Problem, Possible Solutions, and the Need for Verification. We’re joined by Rona Kobell, staff writer for the Chesapeake Bay Journal, and news reporter of nearly 20 years.

 


Sound Bites: Building A Resilient, Renewable Rural Region On Maryland’s Eastern Shore

Photo Credit: Maryland GovPics on FlickrDecember 3, 2015 – Segment 3

On our newest edition of Sound Bites, our series about our food, our environment, and our world, we listen to a panel discussion I moderated two weeks ago at the 16th Eastern Shore Planning Conference in Easton, Maryland. The theme of this year’s conference was  “Powering Our Renewable Energy Future,” and the conversation was titled “Getting the Right Mix: A Conversation on a Resilient, Renewable Rural Region.”

With: Mike Tidwell, Director of the Chesapeake Climate Action Network; Jay Falstad, Executive Director of Queen Anne’s Conservation Association and Owner of Calico Fields Farm; Ernie Shea, President, Solutions from the Land; and Rebecca Rush, Managing Partner of DERP Technologies, LLC.


Sound Bites: Brassica Fest 2015 | Eating Wildly: Foraging for Life, Love , and the Perfect Meal by Ava Chin

Photo Credit: Janet Ulliott on FlickrNovember 19, 2015 – Segment 2

Brassica Fest is here and for our newest episode of Sound Bites we preview this celebration of this beneficial species of plant which include: collards, kale, cabbage and Brussels sprouts.  Marc is joined by  Willie Flowers, Executive Director of Park Heights Community Health Alliance; and Sache Jones, Food Justice Consultant for the Park Heights Community Health Alliance and manager of the Afya Community Teaching Garden in Park Heights.

We close our show with an interview from the Sound Bites archives.  Marc speaks with writer and forager Ava Chin, about her memoir Eating Wildly: Foraging for Life, Love, and the Perfect Meal. Chin is the former “Urban Forager” columnist for The New York Times’ City Room, and The Huffington Post named her one of “9 Contemporary Authors You Should Be Reading.”


Sound Bites: Future of Food in Baltimore, Part 2 | Fast Food Chains Move To Antibiotic-Free Meat

(Photo Credit: Mike Mozart on Flickr) November 12, 2015 – Segment 3

We begin this week’s edition of Sound Bites with the second part of the panel Marc moderated last week on the Future of Food in Baltimore, reflecting upon the significant community work happening in this city to rebuild the region’s food system. The conversation took place at the the Second Annual Town Creek Foundation Stakeholder Meeting. The Town Creek Foundation is one of the funders of The Marc Steiner Show and Sound Bites. The guests were: the Rev. Dr. Heber Brown, Pastor of Pleasant Hope Baptist Church and Executive Director of Orita’s Cross Freedom School; Sache Jones, Food Justice Consultant for the Park Heights Community Health Alliance and Manager of the AFYA Community Teaching Garden in Park Heights; and Kurt Sommer, Director of the Baltimore Integration Partnership for the Association of Baltimore Area Grantmakers.

Our show ends with a conversation on the recent announcements by fast food chains Subway and McDonald’s that they are beginning to fade out the use of meats from animals raised with antibiotics. With: Evi Lowman, Campaign Organizer for Maryland PIRG (Public Interest Research Group); and Mae Wu, attorney for the National Resources Defense Counsel’s health program.


Sound Bites: The Future Of Food In Baltimore, Part 1

comm gardenNovember 5, 2015 – Segment 3

Join us for our newest episode of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world. During the first  panel, Marc moderates a discussion on the Future of Food in Baltimore at the Second Annual Town Creek Foundation Stakeholder Meeting. The discussion showcased the significant community work underway in this city to rebuild the region’s food system and panelists wrestled with what must happen to bring about a community-based, democratized food system.

The panel of guests include: the Rev. Dr. Heber Brown, Pastor of Pleasant Hope Baptist Church and Executive Director of Orita’s Cross Freedom School; Sache Jones, Food Justice Consultant for the Park Heights Community Health Alliance and Manager of the AFYA Community Teaching Garden in Park Heights and Kurt Sommer, Director of the Baltimore Integration Partnership for the Association of Baltimore Area Grantmakers.


Sound Bites: You Aren’t Dangerous Until You Can Speak Powerfully | Perdue Farms Buys Niman Ranch

Photo Credit: U.S. Department of Agriculture on FlickrOctober 29, 2015 – Segment 2

Listen to a conversation I moderated earlier this week at the University of Maryland, part of the annual Maryland Food Access and Nutrition Network conference, called “You Aren’t Dangerous Until You Can Speak Powerfully.” The panel of guests discussed the power of stories in advocacy work, and community and personal empowerment. Joining me for the conversation was Gerald Stansbury, Maryland State Chapter President of the NAACP; Sara Buckingham of the Baltimore City Chapter of RESULTS, a national non-profit grassroots advocacy organization; and Damien Haussling of the Baltimore Area Faces of Homelessness Speakers Bureau.
Then we talk with Tom Philpott, Mother Jones food and agriculture reporter and co-founder of Maverick Farms in North Carolina, who will discuss the announcement last month that Perdue Farms bought Niman Ranch, best known for its pork grown without antibiotic or other pharmaceutical growth enhancers.


The Baltimore Uprising & Food Sovereignty

October 22, 2015  – Segment 3Screen Shot 2015-10-22 at 3.07.04 PM

Our show concludes with a ruminative glance at  the correlation between  food insecurity in Baltimore and what has come to be known as the Baltimore Uprising, the demonstrations and violence that occurred after the death of Freddie Gray.  The discussion features commentary from Michael Twitty, Culinary Historian of African and African American Foodways and blogger at Afroculinaria; Walker Marsh, Founder and owner of the Flower Factory; Sache Jones, Food Justice Consultant for the Park Heights Community Health Alliance and Manager of the AFYA Community Teaching Garden in Park Heights; and Blain Snipstal, returning generation farmer on the Eastern Shore of Maryland at Black Dirt Farm.

This week is the WEAA Fall Membership Drive, so tune in for compelling topics and wonderful premiums! Now is your opportunity to support the station you have come to love: WEAA, THE Voice of the Community. Call 410-319-8888 or visit weaa.org to make your pledge of support during the show

 


The Black Church Food Security Network

October 22, 2015 – Segment 2

Next, we revisit our July discussion about the launch of the Black Church Food Security Network, with: Bishop J. L. Carter, Pastor of the Ark Church; the Rev. Dr. Heber Brown, Pastor of Pleasant Hope Baptist Church and Executive Director of Orita’s Cross Freedom School; and the Rev. Darriel Harris, Project Officer of the Baltimore Food & Faith Project at Johns Hopkins’ Center for a Livable Future.

This week is the WEAA Fall Membership Drive, so tune in for compelling topics and wonderful premiums! Now is your opportunity to support the station you have come to love: WEAA, THE Voice of the Community. Call 410-319-8888 or visit weaa.org to make your pledge of support during the show.


Natasha Bowens On ‘The Color of Food: Stories of Race, Resilience and Farming’

October 22, 2015 – Segment 1Screen Shot 2015-10-22 at 2.08.10 PM

On today’s show Marc and his co-host, Anthony McCarthy, host of the Anthony McCarthy Show, on WEAA will be listening excerpts from three different conversations with the central theme of farming and food sovereignty in the African American Community. We begin with an excerpt from Marc’s August interview with author and photographer Natasha Bowens, about her book The Color of Food: Stories of Race, Resilience and Farming.  From the website: “The Color of Food“honors, preserves, and amplifies the stories and beautiful faces of Black, Native, Asian, and Latina farmers and food activists across the country.” We’re also joined by local farmer Denzel Mitchell of Five Seeds Farm and Apiary in Baltimore to talk about the ways that race intersects with agriculture and the food movement.

This week is the WEAA Fall Membership Drive, so tune in for compelling topics and wonderful premiums! Now is your opportunity to support the station you have come to love: WEAA, THE Voice of the Community. Call 410-319-8888 or visit weaa.org to make your pledge of support during the show.


Sound Bites: Black Urban Growers Conference 2015 | Jazz for Water, Preserving Gunpowder State Parks Streams and Wetlands

October 15, 2015 – Segment 4Farmer's market in Bedford Stuyvesant, Brooklyn, NEW YORK.

We begin this week’s edition of of Sound Bites by taking a look at the annual Black Urban Growers conference which  starts today in Oakland, California, and sets out to bring together local Black Baltimore farmers with California-based Black farmers to talk about their work and the roles they play in transforming the food system. With: Walker Marsh, Founder and Owner of The Flower Factory, a local flower farm in Baltimore City; Sache Jones, Food Justice Consultant for the Park Heights Community Health Alliance, who also manages the Afya Community Teaching Garden in Park Heights; Chanowk Yisrael, Black urban farmer from Sacramento, CA, who founded the Yisrael Family Farm with his wife Judith; and Karissa Lewis, Black radical farmer from Oakland, CA, who is the co-founder of the Full Harvest Urban Farm.

We end this edition of Sound Bites with a feature on the upcoming event, Jazz for Water.  The fundraiser will feature a live performance by the Carl Filipiak Quartet and a Farm-to-Table dinner, all benefiting the Gunpowder River, its streams and wetlands.  Marc is joined by: Theaux Le Gardeur, Gunpowder Riverkeeper; Carl Filipiak, jazz guitarist, who will be performing jazz standards and originals with his quartet at the event; and Robert Shahid, jazz drummer and host of the Baltimore Blend on WEAA 88.9FM.


Sound Bites: A Game of Chicken? (Part 3) | Centro Ashé Herbs & Education

www.centroashe orgOctober 8, 2015 – Segment 3

Today we’re at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore to discuss poultry industry expansion, community health and local control, and hear how concerned citizens in the Delmarva region are beginning to organize to keep their rural communities and local waterways healthy. Our panelists include: Dr. Jillian Fry from the Johns Hopkins University Center for a Livable Future; Dr. Kirkland Hall, a long-time member of Somerset County’s NAACP branch and the UMES chapter adviser; Maria Payan, consultant with Socially Responsible Agriculture Project and with the Assateague Coastal Trust; and Backbone Corridor Neighbors Association spokesperson, Lisa Inzerillo.

We close out with Centro Ashe, a community rooted herbal education program. Centro Ashé Farm is a medicinal plant sanctuary, homestead, and education center with locations in Southern Maryland and Costa Rica, and is home to hundreds of species of medicinal and native plants, open pasture and forest, fruit trees and more. Our guests will be: Molly Meehan, community herbalist, organizer, and Director of Centro Ashé Herbs & Education; and Ayo Ngozi, Clinical herbalist involved with Centro Ashé.

Sound Bites: A Game of Chicken? Pt. 2 | Future Harvest’s Young Farmer Training Program

Photo Credit: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/41588491@N00/3434111411/">joshunter</a> via <a href="http://compfight.com">Compfight</a> <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/">cc</a>October 1, 2015 – Segment 2

We begin with a recent town hall on the Eastern Shore of Maryland where we discuss poultry industry expansion and hear how concerned citizens are beginning to organize to keep their rural communities and local waterways healthy.  Our panelists include Dr. Jillian Fry from the Johns Hopkins University Center for a Livable Future; Dr. Kirkland Hall, a long-time member of Somerset County’s NAACP branch and the UMES chapter adviser; Maria Payan, consultant with Socially Responsible Agriculture Project and with the Assateague Coastal Trust; and Backbone Corridor Neighbors Association spokesperson, Lisa Inzerillo.

We then look into an important educational opportunity: the Future Harvest-CASA Young Farmer Training Program with Sarah Sohn, Future Harvest-CASA’s Program Manager; Ausar-Mesh Amen, current trainee and manager of the Fannie Lou Hamer & Sundiata Acoli Community Farm; and Laura Beth Resnick, program graduate, soon-to-be trainer in the program, and owner/farmer at Butterbee Farm.


Sound Bites: A Game Of Chicken – Poultry Industry Expansion, Community Health & Local Control In Delmarva (Part 1)

(Photo Credit: U.S. Department of Agriculture on Flickr)September 24, 2015 – Segment 3

It’s a brand new episode of Sound Bites, where we’ll listen to the first part of a town hall meeting I moderated last week in Princess Anne, Maryland called “A Game of Chicken?” We met at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore to discuss poultry industry expansion, community health and local control, and hear how concerned residents in the Delmarva region are organizing to keep their rural communities and local waterways healthy.

Our panelists included: Dr. Jillian Fry from the Johns Hopkins University Center for a Livable Future; Dr. Kirkland Hall, a long-time member of Somerset County’s NAACP branch and the UMES chapter adviser; Maria Payan, consultant with Socially Responsible Agriculture Project and with the Assateague Coastal Trust; and Backbone Corridor Neighbors Association spokesperson Lisa Inzerillo. This conversation was presented by the Assateague Coastal Trust and the Assateague Coastkeeper.


Sound Bites: Fermentation With Sandor Ellix Katz | EPA Cannot Approve Pesticide Linked To Honeybee Death | Spotlight On Farm To Chef

(Photo Credit: fishermansdaughter on Flickr)September 17, 2015 – Segment 2

On the newest edition of Sound Bites, our series on our food and our world, we begin with a segment on fermentation with Sandor Ellix Katz, fermentation revivalist and author of Wild Fermentation, The Revolution Will Not Be Microwaved, and, most recently, The Art of Fermentation. 

Then, we examine an important recent Federal Court decision, ruling that the EPA cannot approve a pesticide that has been documented to be involved in the deaths of honey bees. With Tom Philpott, Mother Jones food and agriculture reporter and co-founder of Maverick Farms in North Carolina.

We close the hour with a look at Farm to Chef, a local culinary competition that benefits Days of Taste, an interactive program that encourages elementary school students to appreciate the taste and benefits of fresh food by introducing them to the basic elements of taste and teaching them about food’s journey from farm to table. With Riva Eichner Kahn, Organizer of Days of Taste. The Farm to Chef event will take place on October 5th at the B&O Railroad Museum in Baltimore.


Sound Bites: How We Define Organic Food | When Cultural Food Becomes “Trendy”

Ngau lam is Cantonese braised beef brisket, made with at least seven spices. (Photo Credit: Ruth Tam via Washington Post)September 10, 2015 – Segment 2

Join us for our newest episode of Sound Bites, our series on our food and our world. Today we look at organic food with Steve Savage, blogger and Agricultural Technology consultant; and Jay Martin, farmer at Provident Organic Farm.

We then interview Ruth Tam, Web Producer of The Kojo Nnamdi Show and contributor to She the People, about her recent article for the Washington Post: How it feels when white people shame your culture’s food – then make it trendy.”


Sound Bites: Bottled Water | Vegan Soul Fest

bottledwaterSeptember 3, 2015 – Segment 2

It’s a new episode of Sound Bites, our weekly look at food, agriculture and the environment on the Marc Steiner Show. We begin by looking at America’s growing love obsession with the most wasteful thing there is to drink: bottled water. With: Roberto Ferdman, journalist who covers food and economics for The Washington Post; Christopher Hogan, IOM Vice President of Communications for International Bottled Water Association; and Emily Wurth, Water Program Director for Food and Water Watch.
Then we’re joined by two of the organizers of this year’s Vegan Soul Fest: Brenda Sanders, Executive Director of the Better Health Better Life organization and one of the directors of Open the Cages Alliance, an animal advocacy organization in Baltimore that hosts the annual Vegan Living Program and does solidarity organizing with other social justice movements including Save The Kids and Black Lives Matter; and Naijha Wright, co-owner of Land of Kush.
The 2nd Annual Vegan Soul Fest will take place on Saturday, September 19th in Baltimore. More information available on their website

Sound Bites: GMOs, Herbicides & Public Health | The State Of Oyster Farming & The Challenges Facing Oyster Farmers

Oysters, Photo Credit: chesbayprogram via CompfightAugust 27, 2015 – Segment 2

On the newest episode of our series about our food and our world, Sound Bites, we begin the hour with a report on the potential public health consequences of GMOs (genetically-modified organisms), with Dr. Charles Benbrook, co-author of “GMOs, Herbicides, and Public Health” in the New England Journal of Medicine. Dr. Benbrook is an adjunct faculty member at Washington State University.

Then, we turn to the state of oyster farming in our region as we discuss the challenges facing oyster farmers. With: Donald Webster, Region Extension Specialist at the University of Maryland Wye Research and Education Center and Chairman of the Aquaculture Coordinating Council and Maryland Oyster Advisory Commission; Johnny Shockley, third generation waterman, born and raised on Hoopers Island, and co-founder of Hooper’s Island Oyster Aquaculture Company; and Tim Wheeler, B’More Green, Baltimore Sun’s environmental reporter.


Sound Bites: Natasha Bowens’ ‘The Color of the Food’ | Race And Agriculture

August 20, 2015 – Segment 2bowens

In our latest episode of Sound Bites, our series on our food and our world, we are joined by Natasha Bowens. Bowens is a beginning farmer and community grower in Western Maryland, who wrote the book The Color of Food: Stories of Race, Resilience and Farming. She will present her book Thursday night, August 20th at 7:30pm at Red Emma’s Bookstore Coffeehouse, and this September at the Baltimore Book Festival.

Later, Natasha Bowens is joined by local farmer Denzel Mitchell of Five Seeds Farm and Apiary in Baltimore to talk about the ways that race intersects with agriculture and the food movement.


Sound Bites: The Launch Of The Black Church Food Security Network

Black Church Food Security NetworkAugust 13, 2015 – Segment 3

We listen back to a recent episode of Sound Bites, our series on our food and our world, about an exciting and important new initiative that was launched this summer in Baltimore: The Black Church Food Security Network. With: Bishop J. L. Carter, Pastor of the Ark Church; the Rev. Dr. Heber Brown, Pastor of Pleasant Hope Baptist Church and Executive Director of Orita’s Cross Freedom School; and the Rev. Darriel Harris, Project Officer of the Baltimore Food & Faith Project at Johns Hopkins’ Center for a Livable Future.

 


Sound Bites: The Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act Under Fire | Critics Call It The “Deny Americans The Right To Know” Act

August 6, 2015 – Hour 2 – GMO

In our series about our food and our world, Sound Bites, we listen back to a recent episode where we debated and analyzed a controversial bill making its way through Congress, called The Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act. Anti-GMO (genetically-modified organisms) advocates are calling this the DARK (“Deny Americans the Right to Know”) Act because it would not require genetically-modified foods to be labeled as such. Another critical and far-reaching impact of this bill would be that it would overturn the mandatory labeling bills in places where GMOs are currently being labeled, and make it more difficult for state and local governments to regulate GMO plants.

We hear two different perspectives on The Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act: Will Saletan, who writes about politics, science and technology for Slate and created a piece called “Unhealthy Fixation: The Misleading War on GMOs. The Food is Safe. The Rhetoric is Dangerous;” and Colin O’Neil, who is the Director of Government Affairs for the Center for Food Safety.


Sound Bites: Martin O’Malley | “Our Failed Food Movement”

omalleyJuly 30, 2015 – Segment 4

In our newest episode of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world, we look at the Maryland poultry industry’s criticism of former Governor Martin O’Malley’s stance on biofuel. With John Fritze, Washington Correspondent for the Baltimore Sun.

Then our panel of guests reflects upon an article in the Pacific Standard, “Our Failed Food Movement,” which asserts that in spite of calls for an end to industrial farming, the number of industrial farms continues to increase. With: Carole Morrison, poultry farmer and owner of Bird’s Eye View Farm in Pocomoke City; Nathanael Johnson, food writer for Grist, Lecturer at the University of California, Berkeley in the Graduate School of Journalism, and author of All Natural*: *A Skeptic’s Quest to Discover if the Natural Approach to Diet, Childbirth, Healing and the Environment Really Keeps us Healthier and Happier; and Jacqueline Patterson, Director of the NAACP Climate Justice Initiative.

 


Sound Bites: Is The Safe And Accurate Food Labeling Act Denying Americans The Right To Know? | YES! Magazine: Meet the Scientist Breeding More Resilient Bees

FILE - In this Jan. 28, 2014, file photo, a hive of honeybees appears on display at the Vermont Beekeeping Supply booth at the annual Vermont Farm Show at the Champlain Valley Expo in Essex Junction, Vt. The federal government hopes to reverse America's declining honeybee and monarch butterfly populations by making more federal land bee-friendly, spending more money on research and considering the use of less pesticides. (AP Photo/Andy Duback, File)July 23, 2015 – Segment 3

It’s our newest episode of Sound Bites, our series on our food and our world. We begin the hour with a debate and analysis of a controversial bill making its way through Congress right now, called The Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act. Anti-GMO (genetically-modified organisms) advocates are calling this the DARK (“Deny Americans the Right to Know”) Act because it would not require genetically-modified foods to be labeled as such. Another critical and far-reaching impact of this bill would be that it would overturn the mandatory labeling bills in places where GMOs are currently being labeled, and make it more difficult for state and local governments to regulate GMO plants.

We hear two different perspectives on The Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act: Will Saletan, who writes about politics, science and technology for Slate and created a piece called “Unhealthy Fixation: The Misleading War on GMOs. The Food is Safe. The Rhetoric is Dangerous;” and Colin O’Neil, who is the Director of Government Affairs for the Center for Food Safety.

Next: Earlier this month we started a partnership with our longtime friends over at Yes! Magazine to produce radio stories inspired by their articles. This week’s story springs from the Yes! Summer 2015 “Make It Right” Issue: “Meet the Scientist Breeding More Resilient Bees (And 4 Other People Working to Save the Pollinators),” which tells the story of how scientists, lawyers, and even artists have set out to save our world’s most important pollinators: the honeybees.

I sat down with one of the people featured in that article, Lori Ann Burd, Environmental Health Program Director and Staff Attorney for the Center for Biological Diversity, as well as local beekeepers Bonnie Raindrop, Legislative Chair of the Central Maryland Beekeepers Association, and master beekeeperSteve McDaniel, who teaches a course on beekeeping at the Irvine Nature Center.


Sound Bites: The Black Church Food Security Network

foodJuly 16, 2015 – Segment 3

In our latest episode of Sound Bites, our series on our food and our world, we take a look at an exciting and important new initiative that was just launched in Baltimore: The Black Church Food Security Network. With: Bishop J. L. Carter, Pastor of the Ark Church; the Rev. Dr. Heber Brown, Pastor of Pleasant Hope Baptist Church and Executive Director of Orita’s Cross Freedom School; and the Rev. Darriel Harris, Project Officer of the Baltimore Food & Faith Project at Johns Hopkins’ Center for a Livable Future.

 


Sound Bites: The Native & Black Roots Of American Barbecue | Whole Foods In The Spotlight For Massive Overcharging & Organic Rating System

Michael TwittyJuly 9, 2015 – Segment 3

On the newest episode of our series on our food and our world, Sound Bites, we begin with a fascinating look at the history of barbecue with Michael Twitty, Culinary Historian of African and African American Foodways and blogger at Afroculinaria, based on his recent article for The Guardian, “Barbecue is an American tradition – of enslaved Africans and Native Americans.”

We close the show with a look of Whole Foods, in light of recent allegations of their massive overcharging and complaints from organic farmers about their rating system. With Denzel Mitchell, Founder of Five Seeds Family Farm and Apiary.


Sound Bites: Fight For Food Sovereignty In Baltimore’s Sandtown-Winchester Neighborhood | What Fast Track Will Mean For Food & The Environment

Fast TrackJuly 2, 2015 – Segment 4

On the newest episode of our series on our food and our world, Sound Bites, we bring you the second part of our Good Food Gathering town hall meeting held June 16 in partnership with Hopkins’ Baltimore Food and Faith Project, titled Sandtown: Building a Model for Food and Jobs. The town hall took place at Jubilee Arts, located in the Sandtown Winchester neighborhood of Baltimore, which was at the center of the Baltimore uprising and was the neighborhood where Freddie Gray lived and was arrested.

Marc sat down with three members of the faith community who are working on food and employment issues in interesting and effective ways: Elder C.W. Harris of Strength to Love II Farm and Newborn Holistic Ministries;  Antoine Bennet of New Song Community Church; and Melissa Kelly of the No Boundaries Coalition.

Then Marc talks to Mitch Jones, Senior Policy Advocate for Food & Water Watch, about what the passing of Fast Track trade authority will mean for our food and the environment.

 


Sound Bites: Building a Model for Food and Jobs in Sandtown-Winchester

Good Food Gathering in SandtownJune 25, 2015 – Segment 4

It’s the newest episode of our series on our food and our world, Sound Bites. This week we bring you the first part of our Good Food Gathering town hall meeting held June 16 in partnership with Hopkins’ Baltimore Food and Faith Project, titled Sandtown: Building a Model for Food and Jobs. The town hall took place at Jubilee Arts, located in the Sandtown Winchester neighborhood of Baltimore, which was at the center of the Baltimore Uprising and was the neighborhood where Freddie Gray lived and was arrested.

The panel was comprised of three members of the faith community who are working on food and employment issues in interesting and effective ways: Elder C.W. Harris of Strength to Love II Farm and Newborn Holistic Ministries; Antoine Bennet of New Song Community Church; and Melissa Kelly of the No Boundaries Coalition.

 


Sound Bites: Baltimore Food Environment Map | Veganism and Animal Sentience

Pigtown6June 18, 2015 – Segment 3

On the newest edition of our series on our food and our world, Sound Bites,we look at the 2015 Food Environment Map Report released last week by the City of Baltimore, Baltimore Development Corporation, Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future and the Baltimore City Department of Planning. The report reflects data from a study conducted to inform food policy planning in Baltimore, and it indicates that one in four Baltimore City residents – and nearly one in three children – live in food deserts. Joining us to discuss the Report are: Holly Freishtat, Baltimore City Food Policy Director, Office of Sustainability; Amanda Buczynski, Mapping Program Manager at the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future; and Joyce Smith, community liaison at the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future.

Then it’s part two of our conversation on veganism and animal sentience, with: Brenda Sanders, Executive Director of the Better Health Better Life organization, co-organizer of the Vegan Soul Fest, and a Director of Open the Cages Alliance, an animal advocacy organization in Baltimore that hosts the annual Vegan Living Program; and Naijha Wright, co-Owner of Land of Kush Restaurant and co-organizer of the Vegan Soul Fest.


Sound Bites: Update On 21-Mile Gas Pipeline | Complex Plight Of Chicken Growers Organizing To Change The System | Recipe: Vegan, Gluten-Free Alfredo

Mike WeaverJune 11, 2015 – Segment 3

On our newest edition of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world, we take a trip to Washington, DC, for a conversation on a number of issues around the poultry industry, focusing on the complex plight of contract chicken growers. We examine how the vertically integrated nature of the poultry industry often leaves chicken growers feeling powerless in the face of the large companies to whom they are contractually bound. We also highlight ways that poultry farmers are organizing to change that system, and how their allies in Washington are working to address the problems on a legislative level. Our guests are: Congresswoman Marcy Kaptur, who represents the 9th Congressional District of Ohio in the US House of Representatives; West Virginia poultry grower Mike Weaver, who is President and Co-founder of the Contract Poultry Growers Association of the Virginias; and Christopher Leonard, investigative reporter and author of The Meat Racket: The Secret Takeover of America’s Food Business.

We close out Sound Bites with a recipe for vegan gluten-free alfredo from Naijha Wright, Co-Owner of Land of Kush Restaurant and Co-organizer of the Vegan Soul Fest.

Other information about this episode below. 

Read More→


Sound Bites: Former Governor & Presidential Hopeful Martin O’Malley’s Environmental Record | Gunpowder Riverkeeper Halts 21-Mile Natural Gas Pipeline | Are Animals Sentient Beings?

Martin O'Malley, environmentJune 4, 2015 – Segment 3

On Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world, we begin the hour with a look at former Governor and current Presidential hopeful Martin O’Malley’s record on the Environment. With: Tommy Landers, Maryland and DC Policy Director for the Chesapeake Climate Action Network; and Gerald Winegrad, attorney and Adjunct Professor at the University of Maryland School of Public Policy, where he has taught a graduate course on Chesapeake Bay Restoration since 1988.

Next we talk with Gunpowder Riverkeeper Theaux Le Gardeur about a Baltimore County judge’s halting of completion of a 21-mile natural gas pipeline through northern Baltimore and Harford Counties. The judge cited a failure by state regulators to protect environmentally sensitive waterways in the project’s path.

We close out the show with a question for meat eaters and vegetarians alike: Are Animals Sentient Beings? With two vegan leaders in our community: Brenda Sanders, Executive Director of the Better Health Better Life organization, Co-organizer of the Vegan Soul Fest and a Director for Open the Cages Alliance, an animal advocacy organization in Baltimore; and Naijha Wright, Co-Owner of Land of Kush Restaurant and Co-organizer of the Vegan Soul Fest.


Sound Bites: President Obama’s Pollinator Health Task Force, Does It Go Too Far? | How Our Local Beekeepers Are Faring

Pollinator health task forceMay 28, 2015 – Segment 3

On the newest edition of Sound Bites, our series on our food and our world, we return to the important topic of bees. First we look into the history and work of President Obama’s White House Pollinator Health Task Force, with Juliet Eilperin, the Washington Post‘s White House Bureau Chief, who has been covering the President’s Task Force over the past year.

Next our guests provide an analysis of President Obama’s White House Pollinator Health Task Force, asking Does It Go Too Far? Or Does It Go Far Enough? With: Patty Lovera, Assistant Director of Food & Water Watch, where she coordinates the food team; and Dr. Ray McAllister, Senior Director of Regulatory Policy at CropLife America.

Then, we bring the discussion to a local level with a look at how our beekeepers are faring. Our beekeeper roundtable includes: Steve McDaniel, master beekeeper with 35 years’ experience who teaches a course on beekeeping at the Irvine Nature Center, and past President of the Maryland State Beekeepers Association; Roger Williams, President of the Central Maryland Beekeepers Association; and Kara Brook, Creative Director of Waxing Kara.


Sound Bites: Baltimore Uprising and Food Sovereignty

 afyaMay 21, 2015 – Segment 4

In the latest installment of our series about our food and our world, Sound Bites, we look at the connection between food insecurity in Baltimore and what has come to be known as the Baltimore Uprising, the demonstrations and violence that occurred after the death of Freddie Gray.

We begin the discussion with Michael Twitty, Culinary Historian of African and African American Foodways and blogger at Afroculinaria.

And then we continue this topic with a number of young farmers who  joined us for a roundtable discussion: Walker Marsh, Founder and owner of the Flower Factory; Sache Jones, Food Justice Consultant for the Park Heights Community Health Alliance and Manager of the AFYA Community Teaching Garden in Park Heights; and Blain Snipstal, returning generation farmer on the Eastern Shore of Maryland at Black Dirt Farm.

 


Sound Bites: Maryland Secretary of Agriculture Joseph Bartenfelder