The Marc Steiner Show

Archive for Sound Bites

Sound Bites: Urban Agriculture In Baltimore Schools | Chef Egg’s Interactive Cooking Programs

Fredrick Douglas Highschool (Credit: Afro.com)May 5, 2016 – Segment 3

We host our newest episode of Sound Bites, our series about our food, our environment and our world. We’ll talk about a new youth urban agriculture initiative at Frederick Douglass High School in West Baltimore, part of an urban farming initiative with the USDA. You’ll hear from: Amanda Briody, teacher at Frederick Douglass High School; Abby Cocke, Environmental Planner at the Baltimore City Office of Sustainability; and Allison Boyd, Director of the Farm Alliance of Baltimore.

 Also joining us is Chef Erik Berlin, aka Chef Egg, a local chef, culinary instructor and host of Chef Egg’s Cooking Eggsperience and Chef Egg Live/Hands On Chef Egg – interactive cooking programs. Chef Egg teaches cooking to youth and veterans.

Sound Bites: “If There Are No New Farmers, Who Will Grow Our Food?”

Kim EckartFebruary 4, 2016 – Segment 2

Today on Sound Bites, we meet with Kim Eckarta Seattle-based writer and associate editor at Yes! magazine.  She wrote an article called, “If There Are No New Farmers, Who Will Grow Our Food?” for How to Create a Culture of Good Health, the Winter 2016 issue of YES! Magazine.

We are then joined by young farmers Walker Marsh, Founder & Owner of The Flower Factory; Isabel Antreasian, Project Manager for Whitelock Community Farm; Sache Jones, Food Justice Consultant for Park Heights Community Health Alliance and Manager of the AFYA Community Teaching Garden in Park Heights; and Charlotte Keniston, current Open Society Institute fellow, working with Paul’s Place on community-led interventions to address food accessibility in the Pigtown neighborhood of Baltimore.


Sound Bites: Fairfield Incinerator | The Chesapeake Bay and Agricultural Pollution

22273513619_971f780b59_nDecember 10, 2015 – Segment 3

On our newest edition of Sound Bites, our series on food and our world, we begin with an update on the status of the Fairfield incinerator project. We will also share information on an upcoming action around the project on December 15, 2015. Joining us will be Greg Sawtell, Leadership Organizer, United Workers; and Destiny Watford, a leader with Free Your Voice and United Workers, and junior at Towson University.

There will be an action at the Maryland Department of the Environment on December 15, 2015http://www.unitedworkers.org/events
We then look at a report commissioned by the Abell Foundation, The Chesapeake Bay and Agricultural Pollution: The Problem, Possible Solutions, and the Need for Verification. We’re joined by Rona Kobell, staff writer for the Chesapeake Bay Journal, and news reporter of nearly 20 years.

 


Sound Bites: Brassica Fest 2015 | Eating Wildly: Foraging for Life, Love , and the Perfect Meal by Ava Chin

Photo Credit: Janet Ulliott on FlickrNovember 19, 2015 – Segment 2

Brassica Fest is here and for our newest episode of Sound Bites we preview this celebration of this beneficial species of plant which include: collards, kale, cabbage and Brussels sprouts.  Marc is joined by  Willie Flowers, Executive Director of Park Heights Community Health Alliance; and Sache Jones, Food Justice Consultant for the Park Heights Community Health Alliance and manager of the Afya Community Teaching Garden in Park Heights.

We close our show with an interview from the Sound Bites archives.  Marc speaks with writer and forager Ava Chin, about her memoir Eating Wildly: Foraging for Life, Love, and the Perfect Meal. Chin is the former “Urban Forager” columnist for The New York Times’ City Room, and The Huffington Post named her one of “9 Contemporary Authors You Should Be Reading.”


Sound Bites: The Future Of Food In Baltimore, Part 1

comm gardenNovember 5, 2015 – Segment 3

Join us for our newest episode of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world. During the first  panel, Marc moderates a discussion on the Future of Food in Baltimore at the Second Annual Town Creek Foundation Stakeholder Meeting. The discussion showcased the significant community work underway in this city to rebuild the region’s food system and panelists wrestled with what must happen to bring about a community-based, democratized food system.

The panel of guests include: the Rev. Dr. Heber Brown, Pastor of Pleasant Hope Baptist Church and Executive Director of Orita’s Cross Freedom School; Sache Jones, Food Justice Consultant for the Park Heights Community Health Alliance and Manager of the AFYA Community Teaching Garden in Park Heights and Kurt Sommer, Director of the Baltimore Integration Partnership for the Association of Baltimore Area Grantmakers.


Sound Bites: You Aren’t Dangerous Until You Can Speak Powerfully | Perdue Farms Buys Niman Ranch

Photo Credit: U.S. Department of Agriculture on FlickrOctober 29, 2015 – Segment 2

Listen to a conversation I moderated earlier this week at the University of Maryland, part of the annual Maryland Food Access and Nutrition Network conference, called “You Aren’t Dangerous Until You Can Speak Powerfully.” The panel of guests discussed the power of stories in advocacy work, and community and personal empowerment. Joining me for the conversation was Gerald Stansbury, Maryland State Chapter President of the NAACP; Sara Buckingham of the Baltimore City Chapter of RESULTS, a national non-profit grassroots advocacy organization; and Damien Haussling of the Baltimore Area Faces of Homelessness Speakers Bureau.
Then we talk with Tom Philpott, Mother Jones food and agriculture reporter and co-founder of Maverick Farms in North Carolina, who will discuss the announcement last month that Perdue Farms bought Niman Ranch, best known for its pork grown without antibiotic or other pharmaceutical growth enhancers.


The Baltimore Uprising & Food Sovereignty

October 22, 2015  – Segment 3Screen Shot 2015-10-22 at 3.07.04 PM

Our show concludes with a ruminative glance at  the correlation between  food insecurity in Baltimore and what has come to be known as the Baltimore Uprising, the demonstrations and violence that occurred after the death of Freddie Gray.  The discussion features commentary from Michael Twitty, Culinary Historian of African and African American Foodways and blogger at Afroculinaria; Walker Marsh, Founder and owner of the Flower Factory; Sache Jones, Food Justice Consultant for the Park Heights Community Health Alliance and Manager of the AFYA Community Teaching Garden in Park Heights; and Blain Snipstal, returning generation farmer on the Eastern Shore of Maryland at Black Dirt Farm.

This week is the WEAA Fall Membership Drive, so tune in for compelling topics and wonderful premiums! Now is your opportunity to support the station you have come to love: WEAA, THE Voice of the Community. Call 410-319-8888 or visit weaa.org to make your pledge of support during the show

 


Natasha Bowens On ‘The Color of Food: Stories of Race, Resilience and Farming’

October 22, 2015 – Segment 1Screen Shot 2015-10-22 at 2.08.10 PM

On today’s show Marc and his co-host, Anthony McCarthy, host of the Anthony McCarthy Show, on WEAA will be listening excerpts from three different conversations with the central theme of farming and food sovereignty in the African American Community. We begin with an excerpt from Marc’s August interview with author and photographer Natasha Bowens, about her book The Color of Food: Stories of Race, Resilience and Farming.  From the website: “The Color of Food“honors, preserves, and amplifies the stories and beautiful faces of Black, Native, Asian, and Latina farmers and food activists across the country.” We’re also joined by local farmer Denzel Mitchell of Five Seeds Farm and Apiary in Baltimore to talk about the ways that race intersects with agriculture and the food movement.

This week is the WEAA Fall Membership Drive, so tune in for compelling topics and wonderful premiums! Now is your opportunity to support the station you have come to love: WEAA, THE Voice of the Community. Call 410-319-8888 or visit weaa.org to make your pledge of support during the show.


Sound Bites: Black Urban Growers Conference 2015 | Jazz for Water, Preserving Gunpowder State Parks Streams and Wetlands

October 15, 2015 – Segment 4Farmer's market in Bedford Stuyvesant, Brooklyn, NEW YORK.

We begin this week’s edition of of Sound Bites by taking a look at the annual Black Urban Growers conference which  starts today in Oakland, California, and sets out to bring together local Black Baltimore farmers with California-based Black farmers to talk about their work and the roles they play in transforming the food system. With: Walker Marsh, Founder and Owner of The Flower Factory, a local flower farm in Baltimore City; Sache Jones, Food Justice Consultant for the Park Heights Community Health Alliance, who also manages the Afya Community Teaching Garden in Park Heights; Chanowk Yisrael, Black urban farmer from Sacramento, CA, who founded the Yisrael Family Farm with his wife Judith; and Karissa Lewis, Black radical farmer from Oakland, CA, who is the co-founder of the Full Harvest Urban Farm.

We end this edition of Sound Bites with a feature on the upcoming event, Jazz for Water.  The fundraiser will feature a live performance by the Carl Filipiak Quartet and a Farm-to-Table dinner, all benefiting the Gunpowder River, its streams and wetlands.  Marc is joined by: Theaux Le Gardeur, Gunpowder Riverkeeper; Carl Filipiak, jazz guitarist, who will be performing jazz standards and originals with his quartet at the event; and Robert Shahid, jazz drummer and host of the Baltimore Blend on WEAA 88.9FM.


Sound Bites: A Game of Chicken? Pt. 2 | Future Harvest’s Young Farmer Training Program

Photo Credit: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/41588491@N00/3434111411/">joshunter</a> via <a href="http://compfight.com">Compfight</a> <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/">cc</a>October 1, 2015 – Segment 2

We begin with a recent town hall on the Eastern Shore of Maryland where we discuss poultry industry expansion and hear how concerned citizens are beginning to organize to keep their rural communities and local waterways healthy.  Our panelists include Dr. Jillian Fry from the Johns Hopkins University Center for a Livable Future; Dr. Kirkland Hall, a long-time member of Somerset County’s NAACP branch and the UMES chapter adviser; Maria Payan, consultant with Socially Responsible Agriculture Project and with the Assateague Coastal Trust; and Backbone Corridor Neighbors Association spokesperson, Lisa Inzerillo.

We then look into an important educational opportunity: the Future Harvest-CASA Young Farmer Training Program with Sarah Sohn, Future Harvest-CASA’s Program Manager; Ausar-Mesh Amen, current trainee and manager of the Fannie Lou Hamer & Sundiata Acoli Community Farm; and Laura Beth Resnick, program graduate, soon-to-be trainer in the program, and owner/farmer at Butterbee Farm.


Sound Bites: Baltimore Uprising and Food Sovereignty

 afyaMay 21, 2015 – Segment 4

In the latest installment of our series about our food and our world, Sound Bites, we look at the connection between food insecurity in Baltimore and what has come to be known as the Baltimore Uprising, the demonstrations and violence that occurred after the death of Freddie Gray.

We begin the discussion with Michael Twitty, Culinary Historian of African and African American Foodways and blogger at Afroculinaria.

And then we continue this topic with a number of young farmers who  joined us for a roundtable discussion: Walker Marsh, Founder and owner of the Flower Factory; Sache Jones, Food Justice Consultant for the Park Heights Community Health Alliance and Manager of the AFYA Community Teaching Garden in Park Heights; and Blain Snipstal, returning generation farmer on the Eastern Shore of Maryland at Black Dirt Farm.

 


Sound Bites: 45th Earth Day – How Far The Environmental Movement Has To Go | Environmental Policy in Maryland

gardeningApril 21, 2015 – Segment 3

Wednesday is the 45th anniversary of Earth Day, and on Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world, our panel reflects upon how far we have come and how far we need to go. With: Sache Jones, Food Justice Consultant for Park Heights Community Health Alliance and Manager of the AFYA Community Teaching Garden in Park Heights; Gerald Winegrad, attorney and Adjunct Professor at the University of Maryland School of Public Policy where he has taught a graduate course on Chesapeake Bay Restoration since 1988; the Rev. Merrick Moise, ordained minister, writer, community activist and teacher, and one of the first African Americans ordained within the Old Catholic Movement in Baltimore; and Patuxent Riverkeeper Fred Tutman.

We close out the hour with a look back at the food, farm and environmental issues covered in the 2015 Maryland State Legislative Session, which came to a close last week. With Bryan Sears, Government Reporter for The Daily Record.  


Sound Bites: Baltimore’s Food System Vision

Food-SystemApril 7, 2015 – Segment 2

In this week’s edition of our series on food and our world, Sound Bites, we hear a panel discussion Marc moderated at the 14th Annual New Partners for Smart Growth Conference last month about Baltimore’s food-system planning, policy and partnership efforts and how people are shaping and implementing visions for a sustainable local food system. Our panel of guests included: Anne Palmer, Program Director at Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future; Holly Freishtat, Food Policy Director for the City of Baltimore; Willie Flowers, Executive Director of Park Heights Community Health Alliance; and Walker Marsh, founder and owner of The Flower Factory.


Sound Bites: Young Farmers In Baltimore City On Why They Farm & Their Communities | Finding The Best Matzoh Ball Soup

matzohMarch 31, 2015 – Segment 2

In a rebroadcast of Sound Bites, we host with a young farmers and food justice advocates roundtable. Our panel of guests includes: Walker Marsh, Founder & Owner, The Flower Factory; Isabel Antreasian, Project Manager for Whitelock Community Farm; Sache Jones, Food Justice Consultant for Park Heights Community Health Alliance and Manager of the AFYA Community Teaching Garden in Park Heights; and Charlotte Keniston, current Open Society Institute fellow working in partnership with Paul’s Place on community-led interventions to address food accessibility in the Pigtown neighborhood of Baltimore.

We close out with a segment based on an article from the City Paper: The search for Baltimore’s best matzo ball soup begins and ends at home. With: Evan Serpick, Editor of the Baltimore City Paper; and Myra Serpick, retired social worker and mother of Evan Serpick, who alleges that she makes the best matzo ball soup in Baltimore.


Sound Bites: Vegan Living Program | Hear the Maryland Crunch | Maryland Secretary of Agriculture Joseph Bartenfelder

bartenfelderMarch 24, 2015 – Segment 4

In our latest segment of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world, we begin with a look at a free 6-session Vegan Living Program that begins this weekend at Mt. Royal Elementary School in Baltimore. With: Brenda Sanders, Executive Director of Better Health Better Life; and Erin Marcus, co-organizer of the Vegan Living Program.

Next on Sound Bites we Hear the Maryland Crunch! March 25 is Maryland Day, and Maryland Hunger Solutions and thousands of other Marylanders are celebrating by crunching into a juicy apple! Hear the Maryland Crunch is a fun state-wide, synchronized apple crunch event that aims to reduce child hunger by increasing access to School Breakfast Programs. With Michael J. Wilson, Executive Director of Maryland Hunger Solutions.

Then we hear an interview with the new Maryland Secretary of Agriculture Joseph Bartenfelder, who will talk about the Phosphorus Management Tool.

 

 


Sound Bites: Young Farmers In Baltimore City On Why They Farm & Their Communities | Finding The Best Matzoh Ball Soup

matzohFebruary 24, 2015 – Segment 3

In our latest edition of Sound Bites, we begin the show with a young farmers and food justice advocates roundtable. Our panel of guests includes: Walker Marsh, Founder & Owner, The Flower Factory; Isabel Antreasian, Project Manager for Whitelock Community Farm; Sache Jones, Food Justice Consultant for Park Heights Community Health Alliance and Manager of the AFYA Community Teaching Garden in Park Heights; and Charlotte Keniston, current Open Society Institute fellow working in partnership with Paul’s Place on community-led interventions to address food accessibility in the Pigtown neighborhood of Baltimore.

We close out with a segment based on an article from last week’s City Paper: The search for Baltimore’s best matzo ball soup begins and ends at home. With: Evan Serpick, Editor of the Baltimore City Paper; and Myra Serpick, retired social worker and mother of Evan Serpick, who alleges that she makes the best matzo ball soup in Baltimore.

 


Sound Bites: Baltimore’s Food System Vision

fruitFebruary 10, 2015 – Segment 3

In our newest edition of our series about our food and our world, Sound Bites, we listen in to a panel discussion Marc moderated at the 14th Annual New Partners for Smart Growth Conference last month about Baltimore’s food-system planning, policy and partnership efforts and how people are shaping and implementing visions for a sustainable local food system.

Our panel of guests included: Anne Palmer, Program Director at Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future; Holly Freishtat, Food Policy Director for the City of Baltimore; Willie Flowers, Executive Director of Park Heights Community Health Alliance; and Walker Marsh, Founder and owner of The Flower Factory.

 


Sound Bites: Governor Hogan’s Environmental Policies | Carole Morrison’s Expanding Vision For Agriculture On Delmarva

chickenJanuary 27, 2015 – Segment 4

It’s a brand new episode of Sound Bites, the series about our food and our world. In this episode we examine changes in Maryland’s environmental and agricultural policy under new Governor Larry Hogan. With: Elaine Lutz, attorney for the Maryland Office of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation; Ann Jones, director of Partners for Open Space; and Gerald Winegrad, attorney and Adjunct Professor at the University of Maryland School of Public Policy where he has taught a graduate course on Chesapeake Bay Restoration since 1988.

Then, we’re joined by Carole Morison, poultry farmer and owner of Bird’s Eye View Farm in Pocomoke City, joins us to talk about the expansion of her farm and crowd sourcing campaign.


Sound Bites: Doctors Concerned About Antibiotic Use On Healthy Animals | Maryland Poultry Farms Fined Over Pollution | Visit To Hidden Harvest Farm in Baltimore

animalsDecember 30, 2014 – Segment 2

We begin the an archive edition of Sound Bites with a conversation about a poll released last week indicating that 93% of all doctors are concerned about the routine use of antibiotics on healthy farm animals for growth promotion and disease prevention. Our guests will be:Matthew Wellington, Campaign Organizer of Maryland PIRG (Public Interest Research Group); and Dr. Tyler Cymet, practicing physician and President of the Maryland State Medical Society.

Next we turn to news that nearly one in five Maryland poultry farms have been fined for failure to file annual reports on measures they are taking to ensure runoff from their flocks’ manure is not polluting the Chesapeake Bay. With: Tim Wheeler, reporter for B’More Green, the Baltimore Sun’s environmental blog; and Rena Steinzor, President of the Center for Progressive Reform, and grain and poultry farmer Lee Richardson of the Maryland Farm Bureau in Wicomico County.

We close out the show with a visit to Hidden Harvest Farm in Baltimore!


Sound Bites: Where’s The Diversity in the Environmental Movement? | Diverse Legal Concerns for MD Agriculture

protestincineratorDecember 9, 2014 – Segment 4

It’s a brand new episode of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our future. The first segment springs from an article written for The Bay Journal by Whitney Pipkin: “The ‘green ceiling’: Environmental organizations lack diversity.” Pipkin’s article examines”The State of Diversity in Environmental Organizations,” a report issued by the Green 2.0 working group.

Our panel of guests includes: Whitney Pipkin, writer on food, agriculture and the environment for The Bay Journal, Fellow of the Institute for Journalists of Natural resources and blogger at thinkabouteat.com; Fred Tutman, Patuxent Riverkeeper; Dr. Dorceta Taylor,  Professor, Environmental Justice Field of Studies Coordinator, Past Chair of the Environment and Technology Section of the American Sociological Association at the University of Michigan, and author of the report we are discussing and also Toxic Communities:  Environmental Racism, Industrial Pollution, and Residential Mobility; and Jacqueline Patterson, Director of the NAACP Climate Justice Initiative.

We close out the show with a look at a recent report on top legal concerns for Maryland’s agricultural community. We will talk with the report’s co-authors: Paul Goeringer, Extension Legal Specialist in the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources at the University of Maryland; and Dr. Stephan Tubene, Co-Project Director, Outreach for Socially Disadvantaged Farmers and Ranchers Project.


Sound Bites: Maryland Environmental & Agricultural Policy — What Is Governor O’Malley’s Legacy?

frackingDecember 2, 2014 – Segment 3

In the latest installment of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world, we host a Maryland Environmental and Agricultural Policy Roundtable on fracking and phosphorous management.

Our guests are: Joanna Diamond, Executive Director of Environment Maryland; Mitch Jones, Director of the Common Resources Program at Food & Water Watch; David A. Vanko, Dean of the Jess and Mildred Fisher College of Science and Mathematics at Towson University and chairman of the Maryland Marcellus Shale Safe Drilling Initiative Advisory Commission; and Tim Wheeler, reporter for B’More Green, the Baltimore Sun‘s environmental blog.


Sound Bites: Phosphorus Management Tool |Baltimore’s Brassica Festival

Brassica_romanescoNovember 18, 2014 – Segment 4

In the newest edition of our series on the food system in Maryland, Sound Bites, we begin the hour with Governor Martin O’Malley’s move forward last week with the Phosphorus Management Tool (PMT). The PMT limits the amount of fertilizer containing phosphorus – a primary source of which is poultry manure – that farmers can spread on their fields, in an effort to reduce phosphorus runoff into the Chesapeake Bay. Our guests are: Maryland Agriculture Secretary Buddy Hance;  Kevin Anderson, President of Maryland Grain Producers Association in Somerset County; Scott Edwards, co-Director of the Food & Water Justice Program at Food & Water Watch; and Lee Richardson, Eastern Shore poultry, soy and corn farmer.

Next: Do you know what Brassica is? It’s a genus of plants that includes cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, and Brussels sprouts. We take a sneak peak at the Brassica Festival, happening this weekend in Baltimore! The event, sponsored by Park Heights Community Health Alliance, will take place on Saturday, November 22, from 10am-5pm, and will include workshops, cooking demonstrations, community discussions, children’s activities, a holiday market, a recipe contest and more! Joining us to talk about the festival are: Willie Flowers, Executive Director of the Park Heights Community Health Alliance; and Karen Washington, co-founder of BUGS (Black Urban Growers), community gardener and board member of the New York Botanical Gardens, and Just Food board member trainer.

The Brassica Fest 2014 will take place on Saturday November 22 at the Harry and Jeannette Weinberg Afya Center. For more information click here or call Saché Jones by phone at 443.844.9956 or email at sjones@phcha.org.


Sound Bites: How Institutional Buying Practices Can Impact Local Farmers, Both Conventional & Non-Industrial

irrigationOctober 21, 2014 – Segment 3

In our latest episode of Sound Bites we examine the power of large institutions in purchasing food. We hear part of a discussion Marc moderated a couple weeks ago at the Maryland, Delaware and DC Chapter of the Association of Nutrition & Foodservice Professional’s annual “Workshop by the Sea” in Ocean City, Maryland. We discussed both conventional and non-industrial agriculture in the context of institutional food buying. The panel participated in a wide-ranging discussion about the benefits, challenges and future of both models.

With: Cleo Braver, certified organic farmer at Cottingham Farm, lawyer, and Founder of the Eastern Shore Food Hub; Joe Forsthoffer, Corporate Communications Director of Perdue Farms; Karen Jenkins, Administrator at the Genesis Hammonds Lane Center in Baltimore; Louise Mitchell, PT, Sustainable Foods Program Manager at the Maryland Hospitals for a Healthy Environment and Regional Organizer for Healthy Food in Health Care and Health Care Without Harm; and Charles Wright, conventional farmer and owner of Wright’s Market in Wicomico County.

To hear the full audio from the event, visit soundbitesradio.org.

LINK


Sound Bites: Greener Garden Urban Farm and Oak Hill Honey

bluesOctober 7, 2014 – Segment 4

On our newest edition of Sound Bites, we take a trip to the Greener Garden Urban Farm in Baltimore, where we will hear from: Warren and LaVette Blue, farmers at Greener Garden Urban Farm; and Willie Flowers, Executive Director of the Park Heights Community Health Alliance.

 We close out the show with a piece on harvesting honey In the city, with: Dane Nester, beekeeper at Oak Hill Honey in Baltimore. It was produced by former Sound Bites intern Maggie Dier. 

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Sound Bites: Debating Agritourism | Perdue’s Power | CLF Aquaponics Project & Pesto Basil Recipe

agritourismSeptember 23, 2014 – Segment 3

We kick off our newest edition of Sound Bites with a discussion and debate on AgriTourism, in light of a controversial bill introduced last week by Baltimore County Third District Councilman Todd Huff. What does AgriTourism mean? How does it benefit farmers? Why is this such a hot-button issue across the country? Our guests will be: Teresa Moore, Executive Director at The Valleys Planning Council; and Wayne McGinnis, farmer and Baltimore County Planning Board member.

 Then we turn to poultry giant Perdue Farms, whose Chairman Jim Perdue was quoted in the Baltimore Business Journal as saying that they have no seat at the table in Maryland. Peter Jensen, author and editorial writer for The Baltimore Sun, begged to differ in today’s editorial, and he joins us to discuss it.

We close out the show with a special basil cashew pesto recipe from the Hopkins’ Center for a Livable Future Aquaponics Project at the Cylburn Arboretum!

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Sound Bites: The Meat Racket: The Secret Takeover of America’s Food Business

meatSeptember 9, 2014 – Segment 3

It’s a special archive episode of Sound Bites! Listen in to the informative and lively town hall meeting that took place on May 15 at the Enoch Pratt Free Library, featuring Marc‘s interview with Christopher Leonard about his latest book The Meat Racket: The Secret Takeover of America’s Food Business. Leonard, an investigative reporter, went looking to do a profile on the Tysons – the premier family in the poultry business – and was surprised at what he learned in the process.The Meat Racket reveals the inner workings of the corporations that control the food business, and the power in Washington of the meat and poultry lobbies.

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Sound Bites: How We Talk About Climate Change

polarbearsAugust 26, 2014 – Segment 3

It’s a brand new episode of Sound Bites where the topic is Climate Change, and our discussion springs from an article by Charles Mann in this month’s Atlantic Monthly: “How to Talk about Climate Change so People Will Listen.” First we examine the historical context of the climate change debate. Our guests are: Dr. Paul Sabin, associate professor in the Department of History at Yale University, Director of Undergraduate Studies for Yale’s undergraduate Environmental Studies major, and author of The Bet: Paul Ehrlich, Julian Simon, and Our Gamble Over Earth’s Future; and Dr. Dale Jamieson, professor of Environmental Studies and Philosophy, Affiliated Professor of Law, and Director of the Animal Studies Initiative at New York University, and author of Reason in a Dark Time: Why the Struggle to Stop Climate Change Failed – and What It Means For Our Future.

We close out Sound Bites with a diverse panel of guests who consider the reality of climate change and how we can effectively talk about it. Our guests are: Dr. Patrick Allitt, Cahoon Family Professor of American History at Emory University and author of A Climate of Crisis: America in the Age of EnvironmentalismJacqui Patterson, Director of the NAACP Environmental and Climate Justice Program;Daphne Wysham, a fellow at the Institute for Policy Studies (IPS) where she directs the Genuine Progress Project; and Maryam Adrangi, campaigner with the Council of Canadians and organizer with a member of Rising Tide: Vancouver Coast Salish Territories.

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Sound Bites: US Apples Banned in EU | Chicken Nuggets | Eating Wildly

applesAugust 12, 2014 – Segment 3

In this week’s edition of Sound Bites, listen in to find out why U.S.apples have been banned in Europe, with: Tom Philpott, Mother Jones Food and Agriculture correspondent; Sonya Lunder, Senior Analyst with the Environmental Working Group; and Marilyn Dolan, Executive Director of the Alliance for Food and Farming.

Then we take a look at what’s in your chicken nuggets! Tom Philpott, Mother Jones Food and Agriculture correspondent, shares some unsettling facts about the ingredients in those finger-sized treats that have become a staple of fast food America.

We close out the show with Ava Chin, author of Eating Wildly: Foraging for Life, Love and the Perfect Meal, who tells us about the wild edibles you can find out in the world in the month of August.

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Sound Bites: Pizza King | Phosphorous Regulation | Acting Well

Photo by Justin Levy

Photo by Justin Levy

July 29, 2014 – Segment 3

We start off this week’s episode of Sound Bites with a story about a local man who has eaten pizza every day for 25 years. We talk with Dan Janssen, who has been eating almost nothing but pizza for 25 years and is the subject of a VICE “Munchies” documentary called Pizza King; and Justin Levy, producer of the documentary.

Then look at how the O’Malley administration is approaching phosphorus regulations for the Chesapeake Bay, with Tim Wheeler, reporter for B’More Green, the Baltimore Sun‘s environmental blog.

We close the show by listening in to the second installment of the broadcast of the last of our series of Good Food Gathering Town Hall Meetings: Acting Well. The meeting was held on July 9 at the Netivot Shalom Congregation in Pikesville. We explored how congregations and individuals can engage in projects – from communal gardens to policy work – that have the potential to effect systemic change on our food system. Joining us were: Dr. Surina Jordan, who conducts wellness classes at Huber Memorial Church, and is author of the book The Seven Disciplines of WellnessAbbe Zuckerberg, who organized a faith garden and compost project at Netivot Shalom Congregation; Robi Rawl, who is the Executive Director of Sugar Free Kids, an organization that encourages congregations to engage in political actions that improve the health of children; and Michael J. Wilson, Executive Director of Maryland Hunger Solutions.

This town hall meeting was sponsored by the  Baltimore Food & Faith ProjectInterfaith Power & Light, and The Marc Steiner Show.

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Sound Bites: Good Food Gathering — Acting Well

gardenJuly 22, 2014 -Segment 3

This month, Marc moderated another Good Food Gathering Town Hall Meeting, this time at the Netivot Shalom Congregation in Pikesville. We discussed “Acting Well,” and explored how congregations and individuals can effect systemic change on our food system. Joining us were Dr. Surina Jordan, who conducts wellness classes at Huber Memorial Church, and author of the book The Seven Disciplines of Wellness;Abbe Zuckerberg, who organized a faith garden and compost project at Netivot Shalom Congregation; Robi Rawl, who is the Executive Director of Sugar Free Kids, an organization that encourages congregations to engage in political actions that improve the health of children; and Michael J. Wilson, Executive Director of Maryland Hunger Solutions.
This town hall meeting was sponsored by the Hopkins Baltimore Food & Faith Project, Interfaith Power & Light, and The Marc Steiner Show.

Sound Bites: Chesapeake Bay | Climate Justice | Gather Baltimore

stop-the-incineratorJuly 1, 2014 – Segment 4

We begin our weekly hour of Sound Bites by checking in with Tim Wheeler, reporter for The Baltimore Sun‘s environmental blog B’More Green, on the Chesapeake Bay. Next we talk about climate change across the U.S. with Jacqueline Patterson, Director of the NAACP Climate Justice Initiative; and Brentin Mock, a journalist who writes about environmental issues for Grist. We close out the show with a visit from Arthur Morgan, founder of Gather Baltimore. Gather Baltimore will be hosting a fundraiser spaghetti dinner next week.

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Sound Bites: Good Food Gathering Town Hall Meeting: Donating Well

foodbankJune 17, 2014 – Segment 4

On a brand new episode of Sound Bites, we hear the Good Food Gathering Town Hall Meeting held last Thursday night at the Franciscan Center of Baltimore, in our latest episode of Sound Bites. Our inspirational panel talks about what it means to “Donate Well” and shares creative ideas and programs for providing healthy food to Baltimoreans in need. The speakers were: Willie Flowers, Executive Director of Park Heights Community Health AllianceDanise Jones-Dorsey, Executive Director of My Brother’s KeeperChristian Metzger, Executive Director of The Franciscan Center of Baltimore; and Arthur Morgan, Founder of Gather Baltimore. The event was sponsored by: Baltimore Food & Faith ProjectInterfaith Power & Light, and The Marc Steiner Show.

 

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Sound Bites: Cove Point | State Of The Bay | Will Allen

Will AllenApril 22, 2014 – Segment 3

We begin the latest edition of Sound Bites with a discussion on Cove Point and climate change, with Mark Hertsgaard, Fellow for the New America Foundation and author of, most recently, Hot: Living Through the Next Fifty Years on Earth.

Next we look at the state of Chesapeake Bay Restoration, with Gerald Winegrad, attorney and Adjunct Professor at the University of Maryland School of Public Policy where he has taught a graduate course on Chesapeake Bay Restoration since 1988.

We close out Sound Bites with a special segment on urban farming with urban farming icon Will Allen. Allen, a former professional basketball player, is the CEO of Growing Power, a nonprofit organization that works to help provide equal access to healthy, high-quality, safe and affordable food for people in all communities. He is also the co-author of The Good Food Revolution: Growing Healthy Food, People and Communities.

LINK


Sound Bites: All About Kids! / Hear the Maryland Crunch / Food Allergies / Improving School Lunches / Recipe: Oven “Fried” Chicken

public-school-lunch-food March 25, 2014 – Segment 4

On the latest edition of Sound Bites, we celebrate Maryland Day by learning about Hear the Maryland Crunch,an educational event designed to spread the message that every child in Maryland should have access to a healthy breakfast. The event includes a statewide, synchronized bite into apples. Our guest will be Michael J. Wilson, Director of Maryland Hunger Solutions.

Then we look at the increase in food allergies in African American children, with Dr. Corinne Keet. Keet is an assistant professor of Pediatrics at Johns Hopkins Children’s Center, where she specializes in Allergies and Immunology and authored an article in the March issue of Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology: “Temporal trends and racial/ethnic disparity in self-reported pediatric food allergy in the United States.”

Then its time for a special treat, when we talk about school lunches, with: Chef Ann Cooper, the “Renegade Lunch Lady” and Founder of the Food Family Farming Foundation, whose most recent book is Lunch Lessons: Changing the Way We Feed Our Children; and award-winning film producer, author, and holistic health counselor Amy Kalafa, who produced the documentary Two Angry Moms and is the author of Lunch Wars: How to Start a School Food Revolution and Win the Battle for Our Children’s Health. We close the show with a recipe for oven “fried” chicken from Chef Ann.

Chef Ann and Amy Kalafa will be at Washington College in Chestertown later this week. Chef Ann will deliver the Keynote Address at the 2014 Locavore Lit Fest on Friday, March 28th, and Amy will speak at Emmanuel Church on Saturday, March 29th.

LINK


Sound Bites: GMO Labeling / Environmental News / Black Liquor / Pesticides & Children’s Brain

black liquorMarch 18, 2014 – Segment 3

We start with a debate on GMO Labeling in Maryland, given a bill being considered in Annapolis that would require the labeling of genetically-modified foods. Joining us are Colin O’Neil, Director of Government Affairs for the Center for Food Safety, and Colby Ferguson, Director of Government Relations for the Maryland Farm Bureau.

Then, Tim Wheeler, Reporter for B’More Green, The Baltimore Sun’s environmental blog, joins us for an update on news coming out of the legislature and beyond — all related to food, agriculture and our environment.

We then hear a commentary from Tommy Landers, Maryland Policy Director at the Chesapeake Climate Action Network, on what just happened with “black liquor” in Maryland.

We close this week’s Sound Bites with a conversation on pesticides and our children’s health with Susan Freinkel, Freelance Journalist and Author of Plastics: A Toxic Love Story. She wrote an article last week for The Nation, titled “Warning Signs: How Pesticides Harm the Young Brain.”

LINK


Sound Bites: Farmer’s Roundtable; Brickyard Educational Farm Update; Recipe: Garlic Scapes; The Gaza Kitchen

Garlic scapesJune 11, 2013 – Hour 2

It’s another live episode of Sound Bites, our weekly show exploring the future of the food system. Charles Wright, owner of the Wright Family Farm in Wicomico County, MD, and Ted Wycall, third generation farmer at Greenbranch Farm in Salisbury, MD, join us for a farmer’s roundtable.

Then, we hear an update on Brickyard Educational Farm in Montgomery County, MD, from Sophia Maravell, Education Coordinator at the Farm.

We close out Sound Bites with one of our favorite segments: a weekly recipe! This week, Kristen Carbone of Radix Farm in Upper Marlboro, MD, shares her recipe for garlic scapes, using the “flower stalks” of hardneck garlic plants.

We end the show with Laila El-Haddad and Maggie Schmitt, authors of The Gaza Kitchen: A Palestinian Culinary Journey, who join us from Dar al-Taqwa Islamic Center in Ellicott City to talk about their new cookbook. With 120 kitchen-tested recipes and documentary photography, the authors provide rare insight into Gaza’s culture and cuisine, revealing how conflict and siege play out in the daily lives of ordinary people. Part cookbook, part political analysis, part history, this award-winning book will open your eyes to Gaza like never before.

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Sound Bites: How environmental and agricultural legislation affects the economic and ecological health of the Delmarva peninsula

ag and greenMay 9, 2013 – Segment 2

We have a new episode of Sound Bites. We spoke with different environmentalists, farmers, and public officials about how environmental and agricultural legislation affects the economic and ecological health of the Delmarva peninsula.  Then we spoke with Kathy Phillips, the Assateague Coastkeeper, an on-the-water advocate who patrols and protects the Maryland and Northern Virginia Eastern Shore coastal bays; Royden Powell III, Assistant Secretary for Resource Conservation at the Maryland Department of Agriculture; Lee Richardson, a poultry, soy, and corn farmer from Willards, Maryland; and Dave Wilson, Executive Director of the Maryland Coastal Bays Program.

Then, we discuss new laws, called either “Farm Animal Protection Laws” or “Ag Gag Laws” depending on who you ask, which criminalize whistle-blowing at factory farms. Do these laws stifle journalists trying to expose cruel conditions? Are they necessary to protect farmers from people who want to shut them down? We’ll hear two very different opinions on these laws from Will Potter, a journalist who focuses on animal rights, environmental movements, and civil liberties and author of Green Is The New Red: An Insider’s Account of a Social Movement Under Siege; and Emily Meredith, Communications Director for the Animal Agricultural Alliance.

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Sound Bites: Shirley Sherrod, a St. Patrick’s Day Recipe and More!

Shirley Sherrod, The Courage to Hope

March 14, 2013 – Segment 3

This week on Sound Bites, we start with a conversation about the poor working conditions in America’s restaurant industry, with activist, author, and professor Saru Jayaraman. Jayaraman’s new book, Behind The Kitchen Door, asks how restaurant workers survive on some of the lowest wages in America and investigates how this fact impacts the food arriving at our tables.

Then, Shirley Sherrod, former US Department of Agriculture official and author of The Courage To Hope: How I Stood Up to the Politics of Fear, shares her experience growing up in the segregated South and fighting for farmer’s rights.

Next Tom PhilpottMother Jones Food and Agriculture Blogger, talks to us about two recent studies: one on sugar and one on the Mediterranean diet. Could the amount of sugar a nation consumes per-capita drive instances of diabetes?

We end the show with a traditional Irish recipe in honor of St. Patrick’s Day from Liam Flynn, owner of Liam Flynn’s Ale House on North Avenue in Baltimore. Click here to see the recipe for colcannon.

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Sound Bites: Monsanto In The Supreme Court; Plastic In Our Food; Visions For Transforming The Food System

MONSANTO-articleLarge

March 6, 2013 – Hour 2

It’s a new episode of Sound Bites. We’ll look at the Bowman vs. Monsanto case, recently heard in the Supreme Court, which addresses the question of who owns the rights to Monsanto’s genetically engineered RoundUp Ready seeds. We’re joined by Andrew Pollack, New York Times science and biotechnology reporter; Bill Freese, Science Policy Analyst for the Center for Food Safety; and Gary Baise, legal counsel for the American Soybean Association.

We will also hear from Mother Jones food and agriculture blogger Tom Philpott, who brings us a story about the plastic chemicals that are in our food; and Wenonah Hauter, author of Foodopoly and Executive Director of Food and Water Watch, about her visions for transforming the food system.


Sound Bites: Food Industry Consolidation, Transition to Organic Grain, and Healthy Soul Food

Klaas and Mary-Howell Martens, Lakeview Organic Grains - Photo by Valery Rizzo

February 28, 2013 – Hour 1

On our newest episode of Sound Bites, we continue our conversation with Wenonah Hauter, Executive Director of Food and Water Watch and author of Foodopoly: The Battle Over the Future of Food and Farming in America. Wenonah shares her perspective on how consolidation of food and agricultural companies has affected both conventional and organic farming.

Next we talk with Mary-Howell Martens, who runs one of the oldest and largest organic grain farms in New York with her husband Klaas – Lakeview Organic Grain – for a conversation on how farmers transition from conventional to organic farming. Then, Carissa Lovelace and Sophia Maravell update us on the latest news from Brickyard Educational Farm.

We close out the first hour with a seasonal recipe by Mookie Hicks, the chef/owner of Nouvo Soul Catering, who also shares his insight on how to make healthier soul food.


History of Agricultural Policy in the US

February 14, 2013 – Segment 3

It’s a new episode of Sound Bites. We start with another passage from our interview with Wenonah Hauter, Executive Director of Food and Water Watch and author of Foodopoly: The Battle Over the Future of Food and Farming in America. Wenonah discusses the history of agricultural policy in the United States since the 1980s.

We then turn to the controversy surrounding fracking, a means of extracting natural gas underground. We talk to science writer Elizabeth Royte, who discusses how farm animals can be early warning indicators of possible health risks related to fracking. Focusing locally, we debate Maryland’s proposed moratorium on fracking with Mike Tidwell, Director of Chesapeake Climate Action Network; Mitch Jones, Director of the Common Resources Program at Food and Water Watch; and Steve Everley, spokesperson for Energy in Depth, a Washington-based advocacy group established by the Independent Petroleum Association of America.

We close out this week’s episode of Sound Bites with a recipe for the season: beet salad. Cheryl Carmona and Aliza Sollins, two urban farmers who started the Boone Street Farm in the East Baltimore Midway neighborhood, share that recipe with producer Mark Gunnery.

The Future of Food and Farming

February 7, 2013 – Segment 3

On Sound Bites this week, we start by welcoming back Wenonah Hauter. She is the author of Foodopoly: The Battle Over the Future of Food and Farming in America, and the Executive Director of Food and Water Watch. Over the next few weeks, we will share insight from Wenonah on the issues she covers in her book.

Then, we check back in on a case we’ve covered on this program many times before, that of the Brickyard Educational Farm in Montgomery County that is still fighting for the rights to land the farm has used for decades. Sophia Maravell, Brickyard’s Education Director, and Carissa Lovelace, Campaign Director of Save This Soil, join us for that update of the Maravell family’s struggle to stay on the land.
We conclude this week on Sound Bites with a feature on pesticides and our children’s health with Dr. Lorne Garretson, Professor Emeritus of Pediatrics at Emory University.

Reporting Pesticides in Maryland and What Waterkeeper/Perdue Means for the Future

Then at 6pm, it’s a new episode of Sound Bites. This week, we discuss the controversy over pesticides in our environment with the release of two reports detailing the prevalence of pesticides in the Chesapeake Bay, and a new piece of legislation going before the Maryland General Assembly that would require pesticide applicators, like farmers and pesticide sellers, to report information about them to the state. Joining us to talk about this are:

This week, we also wrap up our coverage of the Waterkeeper/Hudson Trial, in which a Baltimore judge ruled in favor of the Hudson family, the Perdue contract chicken farmers on the Eastern Shore sued by the Waterkeeper Alliance for alleged violation of the Clean Water Act.
Providing analysis of the case and what this means for the green movement in our country are Tim Wheeler, who writes the B’More Green column and reports on the environment and agriculture for The Baltimore Sun; and Patrick Parenteau, Professor of Law at the Vermont Law School and Senior Counsel at the Environmental and Natural Resources Law Clinic.

Future Harvest: Farmers’ Stories of Transition

On our latest episode of Sound Bites, we bring you a recording from a panel discussion we moderated at the Future Harvest CASA (Chesapeake Alliance for Sustainable Agriculture) Conference this past weekend in Virginia. We talked to farmers about their stories of transition. Sharing their stories are

  • Carole Morrison of Bird’s Eye View Farm in Pocomoke City, MD;
  • Forrest Pritchard of Smith Meadows Farm in Berryville, VA; and
  • Ted Wycall, of Greenbranch Farm in Salisbury, MD.

We also hear a sneak peak of next week’s episode about pesticides and their impact on us and our children, featuring Ruth Berlin, Executive Director of the Pesticide Action Network.


Status of School Lunch Reform in Baltimore

It’s a new episode of Sound Bites, a show about the future of our food system. This week, we take a look at what’s happening with school lunch reform, examining trends across the country and in Baltimore City. We talk to:

  • Janet Poppendieck, Professor Emeritus of Sociology at Hunter College and author of Free For All: Fixing School Food in America;
  • Cheryl Carmona, Open Society Institute fellow who created the Greater Greenmount Trash and Recycling Campaign and co-founder of Boone Street Farm in East Baltimore;
  • Bill Struever, former school board member who started the American Community Trust;
  • Denzel Mitchell, founder and farm manager of Five Seeds Farm in Baltimore;
  • and Matthew Hornbeck, Principal at Hampstead Hill Academy.

 


2012 Year In Review & Brickyard Educational Farm

This week on the latest edition of Sound Bites we take a look back at the biggest food, agriculture, and environmental stories of 2012, with Mother Jones blogger Tom Philpott and commentator Tom Horton.

 

We also check in with Sophia Maravell about her family’s struggle to keep their organic seed-saving operation and educational farm in Montgomery County, the Brickyard Educational Farm.

 


Model Food Hub: Red Tomato

This week on Sound Bites, we speak with members of Red Tomato. Red Tomato is a non-profit food hub that connects wholesale growers to supermarkets and other retailers located in the Northeast. They coordinate marketing, sales, and logistics for over 40 family farms and have been active for around 16 years. We talk to:

  • Director of Operations Angel Mendez,
  • Director of Resource Development Laura Edwards-Orr,
  • and Executive Director and Founder Michael Rozyne.

 

Listen to the podcast here.


Mapping Food in Maryland & African-Americans and Poultry on the Eastern Shore

We turn to our weekly exploration of the future of our food system, Sound Bites. This week on the show, we hear about the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future’s Food Mapping project from project manger Amanda Behrens and data specialist Julia Simons. Their map is a visual and comprehensive overview of the food system and all of its components.

Later in the hour, we continue our Sound Bites episode with the role of African-Americans in the creation of the Eastern Shore poultry industry. Dr. Solomon Iyobosa Omo-Osagie II, Professor of Political Science at Baltimore City Community College, joins us to discuss his book, Commercial Poultry Production on Maryland’s Lower Eastern Shore: The Role of African Americans, 1930s to 1990s.

Chesapeake Bay Food and Agriculture History

It’s time for another episode of Sound Bites, our series on the food system. Tonight we take a look back at the history of food and the beginnings of agriculture and trade in the Chesapeake Bay area, with culinary historian Michael Twitty, who blogs at afroculinaria.com, and Mike Lewis, Director of Environmental Studies and professor of History at Salisbury University.


November 29, 2012 – Segment 1

On our latest episode of Sound Bites, Anna Lappe, author, educator and sustainable food advocate, joins us to talk about Food MythBusters a multi-media platform that uses animated and short live-action documentaries to debunk myths about sustainable food and farming. Later in the hour, we will hear from Kristin Carbone, owner of Radix Farms in Upper Marlboro, Maryland. Carbone will discuss the importance of sustainable farming in the Chesapeake region.


November 14, 2012 – Segment 3

It’s time for another episode of Sound Bites. This week, we bring together a diverse group of farmers from across Maryland to share the major impediments they face trying to share their products with people all across the region, and hear their ideas for a more supportive system. We talk to Cleo Braver, owner of Cottingham Farm in Easton; Denzel Mitchell, founder and farm manager of Five Seeds Farm in Baltimore; Ted Wycall, third generation farmer at Greenbranch Farm in Salisbury; and Alison Howard, owner and operator of Homestead Farms, Inc. in Millington, MD.

This week we also discuss the implications of California’s vote on Prop 37, an initiative that would have required genetically modified foods to be labeled. The proposition failed, and the Yes on 37 campaign was outspent 10 to 1. We talk to Tom Philpott, who wrote about this in Mother Jones, and Charlotte Olena, a field organizer with the Pesticide Action Network who was working on the campaign in Southern California.


November 8, 2012 – Hour 2

We bring you another episode of Sound Bites. This week on the show, we speak with members of Red Tomato. Red Tomato is a non-profit food hub that connects wholesale growers to supermarkets and other retailers located in the Northeast. They coordinate marketing, sales, and logistics for over 40 family farms and have been active for around 16 years. We talk to Director of Operations Angel Mendez, Director of Resource Development Laura Edwards-Orr, and Executive Director and Founder Michael Rozyne.


October 18, 2012 – Hour 2

We continue our Sound Bites on Delmarva series with another discussion of a closely-watched trial happening right now in Baltimore. The Waterkeeper Alliance brought a suit against an Eastern Shore poultry farm and the company they farm for, Perdue. At the heart of the trial is whether or not Perdue is liable for potentially toxic runoff coming from one of the farms that contract farms for them.

 

We’re joined by:

  • Scott Edwards, Co-director of Food and Water Justice Project at Food and Water Watch,
  • Patrick Parenteau, Professor of Law and Senior Counsel Environmental and Natural Resources Law Clinic at Vermont Law,
  • and Bill Satterfield, Executive Director of Delmarva Poultry Industry Inc.

October 11, 2012 – Hour 2

This week on Sound Bites, a show about the future of our food system, we talk to a diverse panel of farmers and experts about the Farm Bill, what it means now that the bill was not passed. The Senate voted on and passed the Farm Bill, but the U.S. House of Representatives’ bill failed to reach the House floor. With Congress adjourned until after the November elections, the future is uncertain for some farmers. We talk to:

Then we discuss the Perdue Trial which started this week in Baltimore, and which will have an important outcome on agriculture and poultry in our nation. We talk to:


October 4, 2012 – Hour 2

We present a new episode of Sound Bites, a show about the future of our food system. We take an in-depth look at one story in particular, Nick’s Organic Farm in both Potomac and Frederick, MD. Farmer Nick Maravell’s Potomac location is in jeopardy because of a Montgomery County plan to develop the land he has rented for the past 32 years into soccer fields. That plan is currently on a hold and pending trial.
We explore the complexity of this story and hear the history of Nick’s Organic Farm with Nick Maravell and his daughter Sophia MaravellKatie Griffith, Editor of the Potomac Patch; and Doug Scheussler, Executive Director of Montgomery Soccer, Inc., the organization the county selected to develop the land.

 


September 27, 2012 – Hour 2

It’s time for this week’s episode of Sound Bites! We talk first to Mark Hertsgaard, a fellow of the New America Foundation, and author, most recently, of “Hot: Living Through the Next Fifty Years on Earth.” He discusses his recent op-ed in the New York Times about the Farm Bill, in which he proposes the idea that we should really just let the Farm Bill expire in order to have more time for discussion.

 

Then, we look at a fight that’s taking place right now in California, a fight that will surely set the tone for the the rest of the country and our region. California’s Prop 37 is a ballot measure that will decide whether or not foods with genetically modified parts will be labeled. We speak with Rose Aguilar, Host of Your Call Radio at KALW in San Francisco, California, to get an overview of the fight in her state; Stacy Malkan, Media Director for the Yes on Prop 37 “Right To Know” campaign; and Kathy Fairbanks, Spokesperson for the No on Prop 37 campaign.

 

Finally, we get at the core of what our Sound Bites series is all about, the future of our food system. We talk to Chuck Benbrook, Research Professor at the Center for Sustaining Agriculture and Natural Resources at Washington State University, about how we can transform the food system over the next 20 years.

 


September 20, 2012 – Hour 2

It’s our latest edition of Sound Bites! This week we ask the question: Are organic foods really more nutritious than other foods? A recent study by Stanford University says “No.” But who funded that study? And what does organic mean?

 

You will hear voices from all sides of this issue, from both Eastern Shore farmers and policy experts, as we explore the differences among organic farms. We will look at organic farms that use pesticides and those that don’t. We will examine organic farms that use animal and crop rotation, a practice that some argue puts powerful nutrients in our food. Our guests are:


September 13, 2012 – Hour 2

This week’s episode of Sound Bites explores the debate surrounding genetically engineered and genetically modified foods.

 

Throughout this exploration, we sought to answer three questions: (1) Are genetically engineered foods safe? (2) What issues surround seed saving and why does it matter? And, the question that California will be deciding at this ballot this November, (3) should foods containing genetically modified parts be labeled?

 

We hear from:

  • Andy Pollack, biotechnology reporter for the New York Times,
  • Dr. Cathleen Enright, Executive Vice President of Food & Agriculture for the Biotechnology Industry Organization,
  • Patty Lovera, Assistant Director of Food and Water Watch,
  • and Nick Maravell of Nick’s Organic Farm, which has locations in Montgomery County and Frederick, MD.

September 6, 2012 – Hour 2

“Sustainability” has been a running theme in our Sound Bites series over the past year and a half, and tonight you will hear an episode that illustrates the many different understandings of that theme. Included in the mix will be voices of rural and urban farmers, environmentalists, and food and agricultural experts.

 

The following voices are featured on this program: Molly Meehan, Lee Richardson, Winona Hauter, David Kirby, Ted Wycall, Cleo Braver, Jake Day, James Adkins, Yates Claggett, Sally Fallon Morrel, Geoffrey Morrel, Carole Morrison, Anne Palmer, Laura Flam, Laura Fox, Elisa Lane, Shante Robeson, Denzel Mitchell, Marc Winne and Wayne Gilchrest.


August 30, 2012 – Hour 2

In our most recent episode of Sound Bites, we travel to Prince George’s County and visit three farms, The Accokeek Foundation at Piscataway Park; P.A. Bowen Farmstead; and Yates Clagett’s cattle ranch; for perspectives on sustainability, land stewardship, and how to remain economically viable in a shifting marketplace.


August 16, 2012 – Hour 2

Our Sound Bites series continues with an exploration of Baltimore’s blossoming urban farming movement.
Join us for a trip to the Baltimore Free Farm in Hampden and the Whitelock Community Farm in Reservoir Hill to hear about how these farmers are transforming their communities.

Scene from our tour of Hampden's Baltimore Free Farm


July 19, 2012 – Segment 2

Raw MilkThis week on Sound Bites on Delmarva, we discuss the controversies surrounding raw milk. We speak to Stephen Belkoff, a researcher at Johns Hopkins, and and owner of Forever Endeavor Farm in Baldwin, Maryland, raw milk advocate Liz Reitzig, co-founder of the Farm Food Freedom Coalition, and David Acheson, former associate commissioner for foods at the FDA, who remains skeptical of unpasteurized dairy.


July 12, 2012 – Segment 4

Grass farmer Stephen Belkoff of Forever Endeavor Farm in Baldwin, MD joins us to talk about raising livestock and how government regulations affect small farms on this week’s episode of Sound Bites.


June 28, 2012 – Segment 3

This week on Sound Bites on Delmarva, we’re joined by legislators from Maryland, Delaware, and Virginia to talk about the 2012 Farm Bill. Our guests today are Virginia Senator Mark Warner, Maryland Congresswoman Donna Edwards, Delaware Senator Tom Carper, Maryland Senator Ben Cardin, Delaware Senator Chris Coons, and Mother Jones Food and Agriculture blogger Tom Phillpot.

June 21, 2012 – Segment 2

This week on Sound Bites on Delmarva, we listen back to a panel discussion held earlier this month at the Enoch Pratt Free Library in partnership with Urbanite Magazine about the film Food Stamped,” a documentary about nutrition educator Shira Potash and her filmmaker husband Yoav Potash attempting to eat on the average budget of food stamp recipients—one dollar per meal. First, you’ll hear a clip from the film, followed by a panel discussion with Ann Palmer, director of Eating for the Future program at the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future, Laura Fox, co-coordinator of the Baltimore City Virtual Supermarket, and Laura Flam, who is a nutrition associate at Maryland Hunger Solutions.


June 13, 2012 – Segment 3

On this epsiode of Sound Bites, Carole and Frank Morrison join us in conversation about their pasture-raised hens. Then, Vandana Shiva joins us for a discussion on the movement for sustainable and equitable agriculture in India.


June 7, 2012 – Hour 2

John Robbins grew up the heir to the fortune made by his father, the Robbins in Baskin-Robbins ice cream.  But he gave up his wealth and his claim to the company to dedicate himself to a life of environmental and healthy-living activism.  He is the author of Diet for a New America and many other books, and on this week’s episode of Sound Bites he joins us to discuss his latest work, No Happy Cows: Dispatches From the Frontlines of the Food Revolution.

May 30, 2012 – Hour 1

This week on Sound Bites on Delmarva, we’re joined by Wenonah Hauter, Executive Director of Food and Water Watch. Wenonah Hauter has worked extensively on food, water, energy, and environmental issues at the national, state and local level. She joins us to talk about the relationship between public policy and our food system.


May 24, 2012 – Segment 1

This week on Sound Bites on Delmarva, join us for a visit to St. Brigid’s Farm in Kennedyville, MD. Owned and operated by Bob Fry and Judy Gifford, the farm is home to 160 head of cattle, including 80 milking cows. We joined them for a discussion of the ins and outs of operating a small dairy farm.


May 17, 2012 – Hour 1

On this week’s episode of Sound Bites, we talk with young farmer Orlando Johnson, who is restoring his family’s farm, dating back to the 19th century, in Calvert County. Then, we pay a visit to former Maryland Congressman Wayne Gilchrest to hear about the environmental education program he is running for young people in Kent County. We’ll also stop by the Real Foods Hopkins community garden and speak with students Raychel Santo and Wei-ting Chen. Closing out this hour, Scott Edwards from Food and Water Watch talks about the close ties between Governor O’Malley and one of Perdue’s lawyers.


May 10, 2012 – Hour 1

On this week’s installment of Sound Bites, we have a panel on the 2012 Farm Bill. The panelists are eastern shore farmer Ted Wycall, David Kirby, author of Animal Factory, and Valerie Connelly, Director of Government Relations for the Maryland Farm Bureau.


May 3, 2012 – Hour 2

In this week’s episode of Sound Bites, we take a look at a New York Times article that raised questions about links between “food deserts” – areas with limited access to grocery stores with fresh produce – and obesity.  We’re joined by Dr. Helen Lee, Policy Fellow at the Public Policy Institute of California, whose research is featured in the article, and Anne Palmer, Director of the Eating for the Future Program at the Center for a Livable Future at Johns Hopkins University.

April 5, 2012 – Hour 1

Today we continue our Sound Bites series with a look back at the history of food in our area.  We’re joined by culinary historian Michael Twitty, who blogs at afroculiaria.com, and Dr. Mike Lewis, Director of Environmental Studies and Professor of History at Salisbury University, for a discussion about the beginnings of agriculture and trade on Delmarva.
Then, On Delmarva correspondent Tom Horton discusses his ideas for reworking federal spending so it benefits the environment AND our budget.

February 23, 2012 – Hour 2

This week’s episode of Sound Bites focuses on a lawsuit that’s garnered significant controversy in farming and environmentalist communities in Maryland.  Assateague Coastal Trust and the Waterkeeper Alliance filed suit against Perdue Farms and the Hudson family, alleging that the runoff from the Hudson farm violated the Clean Water act.

Joining us on the show are:

Allen Hudson, one of the plaintiffs in the suit
Assateague Coastkeeper Kathy Phillips, who found the pollutants in the water coming from the Hudson Farm
Julie DeYoung, Perdue spokesperson and Steve Schwalb, Vice President of Environmental Sustainability for Perdue
Michelle Merkel and Scott Edwards, attorneys for Food and Water Watch


February 16, 2012 – Hour 2

In this week’s episode of Sound Bites, we’ll take an in-depth look at an issue we discussed briefly on the show last week.  Should Maryland become the first state to ban the use of arsenic in chicken feed?

Joining us are:

Maryland Delegate Tom Hucker

Maryland Senator Joan Carter Conway

Dr. Bruce Stewart-Brown, Senior Vice President of Food Safety and Quality at Perdue

Julie DeYoung, a Perdue spokesperson

Jorge Aguilar, Southern Region Director for Food and Water Watch

Maryland Delegate Charles Otto


February 9, 2012 – Hour 2

Today on Sound Bites we return to a subject that is at the heart of the debate over the future of agriculture: can organic farming produce enough affordable food for everyone?  Starting off the show, we tour Lee Richardson’s farm in Willards, Maryland along with James Adkins from the Wicomico County Young Farmers.  Richardson, who grows chicken, corn and soybeans, believes that large-scale conventional agriculture is the only viable option for feeding the world’s population.  Cleo Braver, our guest in the second half of the show, is an environmental lawyer-turned-farmer who believes that organic farming is the best way to grow healthy food for everyone without drastic environmental consequences. 


January 19, 2012 – Segment 1

Join us for our weekly Sound Bites series.  This week, we visited the farm of Carole and Frank Morrison, in Pocomoke City, MD.  If you’ve seen the movie Food, Inc., or listened to our episode taped at screenings of the film, you’re already familiar with Carole.  She and Frank were Perdue chicken growers who decided that they wanted to rework operations on their farm.  They now have a flock of around 550 pastured Rhode Island Red laying hens, and we spoke with them about the process of transitioning into this new mode of farming.  You can read Carole’s blog here.


January 12, 2012 – Hour 1

Our series Sound Bites continues with a conversation about the past, present, and future of Perdue Chicken.

The poultry industry is the cornerstone of Delmarva’s economy, with about 14,000 people directly employed and another 100,000 or so indirectly employed by the Delmarva poultry industry.  Approximately 600 million birds are raised for meat on Delmarva annually.

With the Delmarva poultry industry in the spotlight due to a still-pending lawsuit accusing Perdue and the Hudsons, who own a farm in Berlin, Maryland, of allegedly causing water pollution through runoff from the Hudson farm, we sat down with members of Perdue’s management to discuss the lawsuit, environmental issues, and more.

Our guests are Steve Schwalb, Vice President of Environmental Sustainability, Dr. Bruce Stewart-Brown, Senior Vice President of Food Safety and Quality, Mike Levengood, Vice President of Live Production, and Julie DeYoung, a Perdue spokesperson.


December 13, 2011 – Hour 1

Today we continue our Sound Bites series with a look back at the history of food in our area.  We’re joined by culinary historian Michael Twitty, who blogs at afroculiaria.com, and Dr. Mike Lewis, Director of Environmental Studies and Professor of History at Salisbury University, for a discussion about the beginnings of agriculture and trade on Delmarva.
Then, On Delmarva correspondent Tom Horton discusses his ideas for reworking federal spending so it benefits the environment AND our budget.