The Marc Steiner Show

Show Podcasts

The Complexity Around Pain Management For Patients

OxyContinFebruary 26, 2015 – Segment 4

We turn to the issue of pain management and discuss treatment options and barriers to treatment. With: Dr. Thelma B. Wright, M.D., Esq., Assistant Professor, Department of Anesthesiology, The University of Maryland School of Medicine and Fellowship Program Director, Pain Management Center, University of Maryland Rehabilitation and Orthopedics Institute; Nancie Fish, advocate for people who suffer chronic pain; and Jana M. Mossey, PhD, MPH, MSN, Professor, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Drexel University.


Should Police Carry Guns In Public Schools?

copsFebruary 26, 2015 – Segment 3

Maryland legislators are considering a controversial bill that would lift restrictions on when police officers could carry their weapons, allowing them to carry them inside schools, an issue that was hotly debated in a Baltimore City School Board public hearing this week. Baltimore City is the only school system in the state that has its own designated police force. Joining us to discuss the issue are: Sgt. Clyde Boatwright, President of the Baltimore City School Police Union; Rais Akbar, Juvenile Justice Director at Advocates for Children and Youth; school resource officer Donovan Brooks; and Dr. Kimberly Moffitt, Associate Professor of American Studies at University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) and co-editor of Blackberries and Redbones: Critical Articulations of Black Hair/Body Politics in Africana Communities.


Update on Maryland General Assembly

annapolisFebruary 26, 2015 – Segment 2

We have an update on the Maryland General Assembly, which is currently in session, with: Bryan Sears, Government Reporter for The Daily Record; andCharles Robinson, Political and Business Correspondent For Maryland Public Television.


February 26: This Day in History

cashFebruary 26, 2015 – Segment 1

Marc shares some of the events that happened on this day in history, including the birth of Johnny Cash and the first bombing of the World Trade Center in 1993.

 

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City Paper This Week: Dan Deacon & More

Dan DeaconFebruary 25, 2015 – Segment 5

We close out the show with our regular feature City Paper This Week, withSenior Editor Baynard Woods. This week’s issue features a cover story on Dan Deacon.


Bring Your Voice To Annapolis: Lobby Days To Reform Police, Discuss Housing And Jobs

Leaders of a Beautiful StruggleFebruary 25, 2015 – Segment 4

We take a look at a number of opportunities to engage in civic involvement here in Maryland, with Dayvon Love, Director of Research and Public Policy for Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle and Caryn Aslan, Policy Associate at the Job Opportunities Task Force. First we will hear about the opportunity to attend Annapolis hearings on reforming the Law Enforcement Officers Bill of Rights,Thursday, February 26th at 1pm and Thursday, March 12th at 1pm.

Also on Thursday, February 26, beginning at 9:30am, you can attend Lobby Day in Annapolis: Housing & Jobs. This annual lobby day, which will include a rally, march and opportunities to meet with legislators, is organized by Jobs Opportunity Task Force (JOTF), Healthcare for the Homeless, and Out for Justice.


Neighborhood Revitalization & Gentrification In Baltimore: Creating The City We Want

Gentrification in BaltimoreFebruary 25, 2015 – Segment 3

We talk about Neighborhood Revitalization and Gentrification in Baltimore, and how we can create the city we want.

With: Jeff Singer, Founder and former Executive Director of Health Care for the Homeless; Ben Stone, Executive Director of Station North Arts and Entertainment, Inc.; Lena Leone, President of the New Greenmount West Association; John Duda, worker owner at Red Emma’s, Communications Coordinator for the Democracy Collaborative and a founding board member of Baltimore Activating Solidarity Economies; and Mia Loving, Curator and Founder of Invisible Majority, a creative community incubator.


Talking About Race With Bryan Stevenson Of The Equal Justice Initiative

Bryan StevensonFebruary 25, 2015 – Segment 2

We preview of the newest lecture in Open Society Institute-Baltimore’s Talking About Race series, taking place Thursday night. I will talk with Bryan Stevenson, Executive Director of Equal Justice Initiative, a law practice dedicated to defending some of America’s most rejected and marginalized people, about his new book Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption. The book details one of the first cases Stevenson took on, that of Walter McMillan, a Black man who was sentenced to die for a notorious murder he insisted he didn’t commit.

Bryan Stevenson will give his talk Thursday night, February 26th at 7pm in the Wheeler Auditorium at the Enoch Pratt Free Library in Baltimore. This event is open to the public and is part of OSI-Baltimore’s Talking About Race Series, co-sponsored by the Enoch Pratt Free Library. 

February 25: This Day In History

Senator Hiram RevelsFebruary 25, 2015 – Segment 1

Marc talks about what happened on this day in history, including the day Hiram Revels became the first Black man to sit in the United States Senate, the day playwright Tennessee Williams passed away, and the birthday of Bo Diddley.

Transcript of this day in history included below. 

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Sound Bites: Young Farmers In Baltimore City On Why They Farm & Their Communities | Finding The Best Matzoh Ball Soup

matzohFebruary 24, 2015 – Segment 3

In our latest edition of Sound Bites, we begin the show with a young farmers and food justice advocates roundtable. Our panel of guests includes: Walker Marsh, Founder & Owner, The Flower Factory; Isabel Antreasian, Project Manager for Whitelock Community Farm; Sache Jones, Food Justice Consultant for Park Heights Community Health Alliance and Manager of the AFYA Community Teaching Garden in Park Heights; and Charlotte Keniston, current Open Society Institute fellow working in partnership with Paul’s Place on community-led interventions to address food accessibility in the Pigtown neighborhood of Baltimore.

We close out with a segment based on an article from last week’s City Paper: The search for Baltimore’s best matzo ball soup begins and ends at home. With: Evan Serpick, Editor of the Baltimore City Paper; and Myra Serpick, retired social worker and mother of Evan Serpick, who alleges that she makes the best matzo ball soup in Baltimore.

 


Remembering Octavia Butler & Examining Diversity in Science Fiction

octaviaFebruary 24, 2015 – Segment 2

To honor science Fiction writer Octavia Butler, who died on February 24, 2006, we examine diversity in the realm of science fiction, with: Ytasha L. Womack, author, filmmaker, and dancer, whose latest book is Afrofuturism: The World of Black Sci Fi and Fantasy; adrienne maree brown, co-editor of  Octavia’s Brood, sci-fi writer, and Emergent Strategy facilitator; K Tempest Bradford, speculative fiction writer, media critic, gadget head, and board member of the Carl Brandon Society, an organization dedicated to supporting and highlighting people of color in science fiction, fantasy, and horror media; and Jason T. Harris, author and editor of REDLINES: Baltimore 2028.


February 24: This Day in History

Clara FraserFebruary 24, 2015 – Segment 1

Marc shares some of the events that happened on this day in history, including the Battle of Los Angeles in 1942, the day the Supreme Court made a decision in the Marbury v. Madison case, and the day Clara Fraser, co-founder of Radical Women, died.

Transcript of this day in history included below.

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Remembering Malcolm X On The 50th Anniversary Of His Assassination

Malcolm XFebruary 23, 2015 – Segment 3

We commemorate the life and legacy of Malcolm X, who was assassinated on February 21, 1965, with: Mychal Denzel Smith, contributing writer at The Nation, blogger at TheNation.com, Knobler Fellow at the Nation Institute, and freelance writer and commentator whose work has appeared in various publications, including The Guardian, Ebony, and Huffington Post; Dr. Peniel Joseph, Professor of History and Founding Director of the Center for the Study of Race and Democracy at Tufts University and author of a number of books including the award-winning Waiting ‘Til the Midnight Hour: A Narrative History of Black Power in America; and Dr. Yohuru R. Williams, Professor of History at Fairfield University, author of Black Politics/White Power: Civil Rights Black Power and Black Panthers in New Haven and editor of A Constant Struggle: African-American History from 1865 to the Present, Documents and Essays.

 


The Debate Over Standardized Testing in Maryland

standardized-testingFebruary 23, 2015 – Segment 2

We take a look at standardized testing in schools with: Delegate Eric Ebersole (District 12, Baltimore and Howard Counties), member of the Education Subcommittee in the House Ways and Means Committee and sponsor of the Maryland Legislative House Bill that would create a Commission to Review Maryland’s Use of Assessments and Testing in Public Schools; Cheryl Bost,Vice President of the Maryland State Education Association; and Dr. Jack Smith, Chief Academic Officer at the Maryland State Department of Education.


February 23: This Day in History

alamoFebruary 23, 2015 – Segment 1

Marc shares some of the events that happened on this day in history, including the start of the battle of the Alamo and Woody Guthrie writing “This Land is Your Land.”

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Film By Fida Qishta: Where Should the Birds Fly

fidaFebruary 20, 2015 – Segment 4

We speak with Palestinian filmmaker Fida Qishta about her compelling new film Where Should the Birds Fly. It’s the story of two young women living through war and blockade in Gaza. You can visit Qishta’s website here. She is currently raising funds to attend film school. You can donate here.

 


Cricket Arrison’s “Make Yourself at Home”

cricket2February 20, 2015 – Segment 3

Former Marc Steiner Show producer Cricket Arrison joins us to talk about her fascinating and groundbreaking one-woman and one-audience-member-at-a-time play, “Make Yourself at Home,” running at Baltimore’s Annex Theater through February 22.

 


Teaching Black History Outside of Schools

black-school-childrenFebruary 20, 2015 – Segment 2

We are joined by guest hose Dr. Kimberly Moffitt, Associate Professor of American Studies at University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) and co-editor of Blackberries and Redbones: Critical Articulations of Black Hair/Body Politics in Africana Communities.

We take a look at Black History Month and how to teach children Black history outside the context of schools. With: Dr. Ray Winbush, Director of the Institute for Urban Research at Morgan State University; and Dr. Roni Ellington, Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at Morgan State University.


February 20: This Day in History

Frederick DouglassFebruary 20, 2015 – Segment 1

Marc shares some of the events that happened on this day in history, including the birth of Kurt Cobain and the death of Frederick Douglass.

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Hope and Crisis in Greece: An Update on the Current Situation

GreeceFebruary 19, 2015 – Segment 5

We close out the show with a preview of a talk to be held tonight at Red Emma’s Bookstore and Café, Hope and Crisis in Greece: An Update on the Current Situation. With Kostis Papadantonakis, a retired economics professor who has researched and written on the political economy of Greek dependence and Europe’s southern periphery. He is a founding member of Research Associates Foundation and has been an activist in Baltimore for over the 45 years. Click here for more information.


Solidarity Economics: Alternative Ways Of Engaging In The Economy

Solidarity EconomyFebruary 19, 2015 – Segment 4

Open your Economics text as we talk about Solidarity Economics, a pursuit of alternative ways of engaging in the economy that are based on solidarity and work. With: Parag Khandhar, Clinical Teaching Fellow, Community Development Clinic at the University of Baltimore School of Law; and Dorcas Gilmore, attorney and consultant focused on community economic development and race equity issues.


Roland Park: One Of America’s First Garden Suburbs, And Built For Whites Only

Roland Park in BaltimoreFebruary 19, 2015 – Segment 3

Dr. Lawrence Brown, activist, public health consultant, and Assistant Professor of Public Health in the School of Community Health and Policy at Morgan State University, sits in for Marc.

We look at a piece of Baltimore’s history as a segregated city as we examine the Roland Park neighborhood. Our guest is Elizabeth Evitts Dickinson, who wrote an article in the Fall 2014 issue of Johns Hopkins Magazine, Roland Park: one of America’s first garden suburbs, and built for whites only. Dickinson has written about architecture, design, and urbanism for national publications for nearly 20 years. Her articles and essays have been published in The New York TimesThe New York Times Magazine, and The Atlantic Magazine’s CityLab, among manyothers. She is a contributing editor with Architect magazine, teaches writing at the Maryland Institute College of Art, and was the former editor of Urbanite magazine in Baltimore.


Theatre Baltimore: ‘Slaveship: A Tribute To Amiri Baraka’ At Arena Players

SlaveshipFebruary 19, 2015 – Segment 2

Dr. Lawrence Brown, activist, public health consultant, and Assistant Professor of Public Health in the School of Community Health and Policy at Morgan State University, sits in for Marc.

We get a special sneak preview at the production currently playing at the Arena Players in Baltimore, Amiri Baraka’s Slaveship: A Tribute to Amiri Baraka.With director Rosiland W. Cauthen and actors Nathan Couser, Malcolm Anomanchi, and Tracie Jiggetts.


February 19: This Day In History

Bread and Roses StrikeFebruary 19, 2015 – Segment 1

Marc talks about what happened on this day in history, including the day the phonograph was patented by Thomas Alva Edison, one of the bloodiest days in the Bread and Roses Strike in Lawrence, Massachusetts, and the day President Gerald Ford finally rescinded Executive Order 9066, which ended the internment of Japanese-Americans.

Transcript of this day in history included below.

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Theatre Baltimore: One Night In Miami At Center Stage Gets Extended Run

One Night In MiamiFebruary 18, 2015 – Segment 4

We close out the show with an encore broadcast of our show on the thought-provoking, inspirational and entertaining production currently playing at Baltimore’s Center Stage: One Night in Miami, which has an extended run through February 22.

The play is a fictional account of an actual event, a conversation between Cassius Clay (the night before he announced his new name), Malcolm X, Jim Brown, and Sam Cooke, in a hotel room in 1964 Miami, the night after Clay’s defeat of Sonny Liston. With: playwright Kemp Powers; Director Kwame Kwei-Armah OBE, and actors Sullivan Jones who plays Cassius Clay and Esau Pritchett who plays Jim Brown.

To hear the full-length interview, click here.

 


UMBC President Dr. Freeman Hrabowski: ‘Hold Fast To Dreams,’ His Philosophy On Education & More

Dr. Freeman HrabowskiFebruary 18, 2015 – Segment 3

I talk with Dr. Freeman Hrabowski, President of University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC), about the talk he’s giving at Goucher College next week, his forthcoming book Hold Fast to Dreams, and his thoughts on education.

 


Remembering Audre Lorde On Her Birthday

audreFebruary 18, 2015 – Segment 2

We celebrate the birthday of Audre Lorde, who described herself as a “Black lesbian mother warrior poet.” Producer Mark Gunnery spoke to local artists, activists, poets, academics and performers about her life and impact, and asked them to share some of their favorite writings of hers. With: the Rev. Merrick Moise, writer, community activist and teacher, and one of the first African Americans ordained within the Old Catholic Movement in Baltimore; Kalima Young, Instructor at the University of Maryland College Park and Towson University and Director of the Baltimore Art + Justice Project, a project of the Office of Community Engagement at the Maryland Institute College of Art; Abdu Ali, musician, DJ, and arts and culture events curator; Dr. Karsonya “Kaye” Wise Whitehead, Assistant Professor of Communication and Affiliate Assistant Professor of African and African American Studies at Loyola University Maryland, and the author of several books, including the recently released Letters to My Black Sons: Raising Boys in a Post-Racial America, and the award-winning Notes From A Colored Girl: The Civil War Pocket Diaries of Emile Frances Davis; and Michelle Antoinette Nelson aka LOVE the Poet, indie spoken word artist and musician, and author of the book Black Marks on White Paper.

 


February 18: This Day in History

dr-dre-1February 18, 2015 – Segment 1

Marc shares some of the events that happened on this day in history, including the birth of Dr. Dre and the founding of Morehouse College.

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Sound Bites: Fair Treatment For Farmworkers & The Human Cost Of Our Food Supply System

coalition immokalee workersFebruary 17, 2015 – Segment 4

On our series about our food and our world – Sound Bites – we bring you a tape of a panel discussion from last Thursday at Red Emma’s Bookstore and Café, which followed a screening of Food Chains, a documentary about the work of the Coalition of Immokalee Workers to achieve fair treatment for farmworkers. The film reveals the human cost of our food supply system and the complicity of large buyers of produce in the exploitation of farmworkers. The event was co-sponsored by The Baltimore Food & Faith Project at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health’s Center for a Livable Future. Our panelists were: poet, activist, minister, organizer and educator Ken Brown, also known as Analysis; food justice, healthcare and labor activist Sergio España; and Rachel Winograd, Food Justice Coordinator for CATA, the Farmworker Support Committee.

As part of the hour we also listen back to my interview from a few years ago with one of the founders of the Coalition of Immokalee Workers, Lucas Benitez.


From The Archives: Are We Over-Medicating Our Children?

ritalinFebruary 17, 2015 – Segment 3

Listen in to a special 2012 archive edition of The Marc Steiner Show, on prescription medications and children. I talk with Dr. Alan Sroufe, Professor Emeritus of Psychology at the University of Minnesota’s Institute of Child Development, who at one time believed that Ritalin was as necessary for children suffering from attention deficit disorder as insulin is for diabetics. Over the last 40 years of reviewing the drugs, however, his position has changed, and he believes that these drugs are dangerously over-prescribed.


Creating Brave Spaces: UMBC’s Critical Social Justice Intensive

UMBC Critical Social Justice WeekFebruary 17, 2015 – Segment 2

Marc Steiner Show Producer Stefanie Mavronis talks to University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) Women’s Center Director Jess Myers, Women’s Center Coordinator Megan Tagle Adams, UMBC student organizer Amelia Meman, and Assistant Director of Student Life, Cultural and Spiritual Diversity Lisa Gray about UMBC Critical Social Justice Week, a week-long series of events focused on learning social justice, teaching social justice and “Creating Brave Spaces,” this year’s theme.

The Women’s Center with Student Life’s Mosaic Center presents the Critical Social Justice 2015 Keynote Lecture with comedian and blogger Franchesca “Chescaleigh” Ramsey. She’ll be discussing “Your Powerful Online Voice: Social Media for Social Change” this Wednesday night, February 18th, at 7pm in the UMBC University Center Ballroom, 1000 Hilltop Circle in Catonsville. This event is open to the public.

More information about the keynote and the other great programming happening at UMBC during Critical Social Justice week at critsocjustice.wordpress.com  and at womenscenter.umbc.edu 


February 17: This Day In History

Huey NewtonFebruary 17, 2015 – Segment 1

Marc discusses what happened today in history, including the birthday of Black Panther founder Huey Newton, the day Bedonkohe Apache leader Geronimo passed away, and the day the United States House of Representatives passed the Missouri Compromise.

Transcript of this day in history included below.

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Try Love Campaign: Spreading Love Through Park Heights

tryloveFebruary 16, 2015 – Segment 4

Willie Flowers, Executive Director of the Park Heights Community Health Alliance, joins us to talk about his organization’s new “Try Love” campaign.

 


Baltimore & State Roundup: Frank Conaway Sr., Maryland Politics & More

city hallFebruary 16, 2015 – Segment 3

We host a news roundtable, discussing, among other things, the passing of Frank Conaway Sr., with: Anthony McCarthy, Host of the Anthony McCarthy Show on WEAA 88.9FM; and the Rev. Merrick Moise, teacher, writer, community activist, and one of the first African American people ordained within the Old Catholic Movement in Baltimore.


Delegate Cory McCray On Being A Freshman Legislator & Sponsoring Legislation

Cory-McCrayFebruary 16, 2015 – Segment 2

The 2015 Maryland General Assembly has been in session for over a month, and one of our state’s new legislators, Delegate Cory McCray (D-District 45, Baltimore City), offers an update on the Session. Delegate McCray reports on his first few weeks as a legislator and the legislation he’s sponsoring this year.


February 16: This Day in History

ABushFebruary 16, 2015 – Segment 1

Marc shares some of the events that happened on this day in history, including the birth of James Baskett, the first African American man to receive an Oscar and the death of actress Anita Bush.

Transcript of this day in history included below.

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Dr. Kaye Whitehead Op-Ed Series In The Baltimore Sun

kayeFebruary 13, 2015 – Segment 4

Dr. Karsonya “Kaye” Wise Whitehead, Assistant Professor of Communication and Affiliate Assistant Professor of African and African American Studies at Loyola University Maryland, and author of the award-winning Notes From a Colored Girl: The Civil War Pocket Diaries of Emile Frances Davis and Letters to My Black Sons: Raising Boys in a Post-Racial America, joins us to talk about her op-ed series in the Baltimore Sun this month. You can read Part 1: “From enslavement to freedom” here.


Remembering Maryland Poet Laureate Lucille Clifton

cliftonFebruary 13, 2015 – Segment 3

Maryland Poet Laureate Lucille Clifton passed away on this day in 2010. We remember her by listening to her read some of her best poems, and we listen back to a segment from the Marc Steiner Show archives, where we talked to friends and colleagues about Lucille Clifton’s life and legacy shortly after her passing. Featuring: Michael Glaser, the Poet Laureate of Maryland, who taught with Lucille Clifton at St. Mary’s College of Maryland, and his wife Kathleen Glaser, who was principal of Hollywood Elementary School where Clifton spoke to students; E. Ethelbert Miller, a poet and literary activist on the Board of the Institute for Policy Studies, and Director of the African American Resource Center at Howard University; poet and playwright Kenneth Carroll; and Wayne Karlin, a writer, who has written and edited many books, and a professor in the Languages and Literature Department at the College of Southern Maryland.


Griot’s Eye Youth Film and Culture Festival

griotFebruary 13, 2015 – Segment 2

We preview The Griot‘s Eye Youth Film and Culture Festival that’s taking place this weekend at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of African American History and Culture with Ras Tre Subira, Director of African Youth Alchemy and Organizer of the Griot‘s Eye Film Festival, and Babatunde Salaam, Partner with Griot‘s EyeFestival, Filmmaker and Organizer. The festival is filled with the film, theatre, African dance, and poetry of Baltimore’s youth.

The Griot‘s Eye Youth Film and Culture Festival is happening this Saturday at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum at noon. For more information, call 443-263-1800.

February 13: This Day in History

fountainFebruary 13, 2015 – Segment 1

Marc shares some of the events that happened on this day in history, including the 1960 sit-in of Black college students at lunch counters in Nashville.

Transcript of this day in history below.

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Maryland Drug Policy: Addressing The Heroin Problem Through Treatment & Legislation

heroinFebruary 12, 2015 – Segment 4

We turn our attention to heroin use in Maryland, as well as treatment programs and policy issues. With: Woody Curry, therapist in private practice and clinical consultant who runs programs in Maryland addressing substance abuse and mental health; Mark Sine, Executive Director of the Baltimore Student Harm Reduction Coalition; Del. Kathleen M. Dumais, Maryland Delegate for District 15 in Montgomery County and Vice Chair of the House Judiciary Committee; and Peter Bruun, artist, curator and organizer behind the New Day Campaign, which challenges social stigma around drugs and addiction. 

 


Social Justice Activism in the Church

churchFebruary 12, 2015 – Segment 3

We examine the role of social justice activism in the church, with: the Rev. Kevin Slayton, Pastor of New Waverly United Methodist Church and former civil rights lobbyist; and the Rev. Dr. Heber Brown, community activist, pastor of Pleasant Hope Baptist Church and Executive Director of Orita’s Cross Freedom School.


Islamophobia in the US In The Wake Of Fatal North Carolina Shooting

ncFebruary 12, 2015 – Segment 2

In light of Tuesday’s fatal shootings of three young Muslims near the University of North Carolina, we examine Islamophobia in America, with: Imam Earl El-Amin of the Muslim Community Cultural Center of Baltimore;  Zainab Chaudry, CAIR Maryland Outreach Manager for the Council on American-Islamic Relations; and theRev. Dr. Heber Brown, community activist, pastor of Pleasant Hope Baptist Church and Executive Director of Orita’s Cross Freedom School.

 


February 12: This Day in History

darwinFebruary 12, 2015 – Segment 1

Marc shares some of the events that happened on this day in history, including the births of Charles Darwin and Abraham Lincoln, and the establishment of the NAACP.

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City Paper This Week: Sex Issue

City PaperFebruary 11, 2015 – Segment 4

We close the show with our weekly feature City Paper This Week with Senior Editor Baynard Woods. This week’s issue looks at sex.


If I Were Mayor Of Baltimore: Arts, Development & Gentrification In Our City

Station North Arts and Entertainment DistrictFebruary 11, 2015 – Segment 3

It’s another one of our regular features, “If I Were Mayor of Baltimore,” as we discuss the Arts, development, and gentrification in our city.

With:Paul Rucker, visual artist, composer, musician, and Artist-in-Residence at both MICA (Maryland Institute College of Art) and the Creative Alliance; David Mitchell, Program Manager for the Urban Arts Leadership Program at the Greater Baltimore Cultural Alliance, Community Outreach Coordinator for the Baltimore Arts Realty Corporation, Executive Board member/ Associate Artistic Director for Arena Players, Board Member for EMP Collective and Board member for The Bromo Seltzer Arts District; Michelle Gomez, independent curator who works collaboratively with under-represented audiences on community-focused exhibitions in Baltimore, and recent graduate of the MICA MFA in Curatorial Practice program; and Cara Ober, Founder and Editor-In-Chief of Bmore Art, who holds an MFA in painting from MICA and a MS in Art Education from McDaniel College.


Baltimore African American Experience Through The Lens Of Three Generations Of The Phillips Family

Phillips PhotographersFebruary 11, 2015 – Segment 2

We preview of a visual treat, as we examine the Baltimore African American experience through the lens of three generations of the Phillips family, photographers who have captured Baltimore’s African American community and culture since 1946 when Irving Henry Phillips began working as a photographer for the Baltimore Afro-American. Their work is celebrated in a special exhibition at Baltimore’s City Hall. With: Webster Phillips III, grandson of photographer Irving Henry Phillips and a photographer himself; and Irving Phillips, Jr., son of photographer Irving Henry Phillips and former staff photographer for The Baltimore Sun.

“You & I. Henry: A Journey Through Baltimore and Beyond from Behind the Lens of Three Generations,” is on view now through March 13 at the City Hall Courtyard Galleries, 100 N. Holliday Street in Baltimore.


February 11: This Day In History

The Long WalkFebruary 11, 2015 – Segment 1

Marc talks about what happened on this day in history, including the birthday of first female AME preacher Jarena Lee, the day Black students in Cambridge, MD, among other states, staged a boycott to protest conditions in segregated schools, and the day thousands of Native Americans in 1978 undertook the Long Walk.

Transcript of this day in history included below.

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Sound Bites: Baltimore’s Food System Vision

fruitFebruary 10, 2015 – Segment 3

In our newest edition of our series about our food and our world, Sound Bites, listen in to a panel discussion Marc moderated at the 14th Annual New Partners for Smart Growth Conference last month about Baltimore’s food-system planning, policy and partnership efforts and how people are shaping and implementing visions for a sustainable local food system.

Our panel of guests included: Anne Palmer, Program Director at Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future; Holly Freishtat, Food Policy Director for the City of Baltimore; Willie Flowers, Executive Director of Park Heights Community Health Alliance; and Walker Marsh, Founder and owner of The Flower Factory.

 


Prison Reform and Abolition: BGF, New Prison Leadership & More

jail-cellFebruary 10, 2015 – Segment 2

In light of the news that Tavon White – the Black Guerrilla Family member who ran a drug ring in prison and impregnated four guards – would receive a lightened sentence because he gave key testimony against other inmates and guards, as well as public statements made by Stephen T. Moyer, Governor Larry Hogan’s nominee to run the Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services, our panel discusses prison reform.

With: Harold Bailey, former Open Society Institute Fellow who – after being incarcerated in the Maryland prison system for 20 years — partnered with Tuerk House Recovery Centers to provide services for formerly incarcerated males; Israel Cason, President and Founder of I Can’t We Can; Eddie Conway, former political prisoner and producer for the Real News Network; Dominque Stevenson, Program Director for the American Friends Service Committee and co-author with Eddie Conway of Marshall Law: The Life and Times of a Baltimore Black Panther.


February 10: This Day in History

dillaFebruary 10, 2015 – Segment 1

Marc shares some of the events that happened on this day in history, including J Dilla’s passing, the 1890 South Dakota Land Grab, and the death of  Stuart Hall.

Transcript of this day in history is included below.

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D. Watkins’ Neighborhood Revolution, One Letter At A Time

D WatkinsFebruary 9, 2015 – Segment 4

We are joined by author, filmmaker and Coppin State University professor D. Watkins about his new article in Salon: “My neighborhood revolution, one letter at a time.”

 


Addressing The Islamic State With Dr. Steven David & Phyllis Bennis

Islamic StateFebruary 9, 2015 – Segment 3

We continue our coverage and analysis of the Islamic State with Dr. Steven David, Professor of Political Science and Vice Dean for Undergraduate Education at Johns Hopkins University; and Phyllis Bennis, Director of the New Internationalism Project at the Institute for Policy Studies.


The Debate Between Charter Schools & Traditional Public Schools

Baltimore, Md.--1/30/13-- Students of Bluford Drew Jemison STEM Academy packed the Baltimore City Public Schools Board of Commissioners during a meeting on the renewal recommendation of operator run schools (charter schools.)  Photo by: Kenneth K. Lam/The Baltimore Sun  _KKL7619  md-p4-charter-school-hearing lamFebruary 9, 2015 – Segment 2

Where do you fall in the debate between charter schools and traditional public schools? We talk to people with different opinions on charter schools about school closings, school funding, and the future of education.

With: Dr. Jessica T. Shiller, Professor of Urban Education at Towson University, who produced and directed the documentary Schools Out: Closing Baltimore Schools with New Lens and the Baltimore Algebra Project; Dr. Roni Ellington, Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at Morgan State University; Bobbi Macdonald, Executive Director of the City Neighbors Foundation; and Dr. Kimberly Moffitt, Associate Professor of American Studies at University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) and Founding Parent at the Baltimore Collegiate School For Boys.

 


February 9: This Day In History

Hlubi Chief LangalibaleleFebruary 9, 2015 – Segment 1

Marc talks about what happened on this day in history, including the day Hlubi Chief Langalibalele became one of the first Black activists to be tried and banished to Robben Island, the day Satchel Paige became the first Negro League player to be voted into the Baseball Hall of Fame, and the day the American Revolution began.

Transcript of this day in history included below.

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Theatre Baltimore: The Prostate Dialogues and Tales of the Tellywacker At Baltimore Theatre Project

Prostate DialoguesFebruary 6, 2015 – Segment 4

We close out the show with another theatrical treat, as internationally renowned storyteller Jon Spelman joins us to talk about his one-man show at Baltimore’s Theatre Project, The Prostate Dialogues and Tales of the Tellywacker.

 


Freedom’s Diaries: Diaries Of Free African Americans Throughout The Antebellum & Civil War

Freedoms DiariesFebruary 6, 2015 – Segment 3

We hear a preview of an event this weekend at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of African American History and Culture, Freedom’s Diaries. The event showcases two diaries of Black individuals from the Antebellum and Civil War period.

With: Dr. Karsonya “Kaye” Whitehead, Assistant Professor of Communication and Affiliate Assistant Professor of African and African American Studies at Loyola University Maryland, author of Notes From a Colored Girl: The Civil War Pocket Diaries of Emile Frances Davis and My Black Sons: Raising Boys in a Post-Racial America, which just came out last week; and Dr. Myra Young Armstead, Professor of History and Director of Africana Studies at Bard College and author of a number of books including Freedom’s Gardener: James F. Brown, Horticulture, and the Hudson Valley in Antebellum America.


Celebrating Bob Marley’s 70th Birthday: His Legacy, Politics & Spirituality

Bob MarleyFebruary 6, 2015 – Segment 2

In honor of the 70th anniversary of the birth of Bob Marley, our guests offer a tribute to the memory of the Reggae King. With: Dermot Hussey, host of The Joint on Sirius XM, recipient of the prestigious Musgrave Medal for services to media and music, and co-author of Bob Marley: Reggae King of the World; Dera Tompkins, Reggae historian, Biomedical Librarian at the National Institutes of Health, and personal friend of the Marley family; and award-winning director, actor, and playwright Kwame Kwei-Armah O.B.E., Artistic Director at CenterStage in Baltimore and playwright of Marley, which will premiere in June at CenterStage.


February 6: This Day In History

Mayflower of LiberiaFebruary 6, 2015 – Segment 1

Marc talks about what happened on this day in history, including the birthday of Bob Marley, the day Jamaican sound engineer King Tubby passed away, and the day 86 free African Americans boarded the Mayflower of Liberia headed for Sierra Leone.

Transcript of this day in history below. 

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Health & Wellness: Keeping January’s Fitness Goals

Keeping January's fitness goalsFebruary 5, 2015 – Segment 3

It’s our regular monthly feature on Health and Wellness, with Chauncey Whitehead, fitness trainer and activist, and Rhonda Silva, Division Administrator of the Baltimore City Cancer Program (BCCP) at the University of Maryland’s Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center. Join in the discussion as we talk about keeping January’s fitness goals in February.

 


The Martyrdom Of Salvadoran Archbishop Oscar Romero

Oscar RomeroFebruary 5, 2015 – Segment 2

We reflect on the life and legacy of slain Salvadoran Archbishop Oscar Romero, whose 1980 murder was proclaimed martyrdom this week by Pope Francis, thereby setting the stage for his beatification. With: Catholic activist Rosemary Maguire Thompson; and Luis Larin, United Workers Leadership Organizer.


Analyzing Governor Larry Hogan’s State Of The State Address

Governor Hogan Maryland State of the StateFebruary 5, 2015 – Segment 1

Our panel of guests offers commentary on Maryland Governor Larry Hogan’s State of the State Address, delivered today.

With: Greg Kline, attorney, co-Founder and Contributing Editor for Red Maryland, Host of the Conservative Refugee podcast and co-Host of Red Maryland Radio; Dr. John Bullock, Professor of Political Science at Towson University; Adam Jackson, CEO of Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle; and Catalina Byrd, media consultant and political strategist, and co-host of No Hooks for the Hip-Hop Chronicles on WEAA.


City Paper This Week: Devil In The Details

City PaperFebruary 4, 2015 – Segment 5

We take a look at what’s in this week’s issue of the Baltimore City Paper with Senior Editor Baynard Woods.


Dave Zirin: The Conspiracy Theory Surrounding The Seahawks’ Last Play

fightFebruary 4, 2015 – Segment 4

We speak with The Nation‘s Sports Editor Dave Zirin about his article The Conspiracy Theory Surrounding The Seahawks’ Last Play. Zirin is also host of The Edge of Sports Radio and author of a number of books, most recently Brazil’s Dance with the Devil: The World Cup and the Fight for Democracy.


Vaccine, Measles, and Children: Is Worry Over Vaccines Misplaced?

vaccineFebruary 4, 2015 – Segment 3

We turn to the topic of vaccinations, measles, and children, with: Dr. Julia A. McMillan, Professor of Pediatrics, Executive Vice Chair of the Department of Pediatrics, Associate Dean for Graduate Medical Education, and Designated Institutional Official at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine; and Dr. Andrea A. Berry, Assistant Professor, Division of Infectious Diseases and Tropical Pediatrics Departments of Pediatrics and Medicine and Center for Vaccine Development at the University of Maryland School of Medicine.

 


Kurt Schmoke: On The Future Of Baltimore & Being UB President

kurtFebruary 4, 2015 – Segment 2

We’re joined for a conversation with Kurt Schmoke, President of University of Baltimore and former mayor of Baltimore.


February 5: This Day in History

leopoldFebruary 4, 2015 – Segment 1

Marc shares some of the events that happened on this day in history, including the 1885 declaration by King Leopold II of Belgium that the Congo would be his personal possession, and proceeded to murder and torture millions of Congolese people.

Today in 1885, on the heels of the Conference of Berlin that divided up control of Africa to the European powers, King Leopold II of Belgium declared that the Congo would be his personal possession.  He looted the place they called Congo, and killed, murdered and tortured tens of thousands of native people in one of the most vicious colonization process in all of world history.

Note: Although this segment was broadcast on February 4th, the day in history information is for February 5th.

Transcript below:

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Sound Bites: St. Brigit, Patron Saint Of Sound Bites | Why Did The Chicken Cross The World? | Recipe: Leftover Couscous Salad

Free-range chickens stand in a pen at an organic-accredited poultry farm in Germany.February 3, 2015 – Segment 3

On the newest episode of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world, we begin the show with a look at St. Brigit’s Day, which was celebrated on February 1. St. Brigit is the patron saint of cattle, chicken farmers, dairymaids, dairy workers, milk maids, poultry farmers, poultry raisers, watermen & more – so we deem her the saint of Sound Bites!

Next, I interview journalist Andrew Lawler about his fascinating book Why Did the Chicken Cross the World?

We close out Sound Bites with a special leftover couscous salad recipe from Michael Twitty, Culinary Historian of African and African American Foodways and blogger at Afroculinaria.


What Should The Role Of Police Be In Maryland Schools?

Maryland bill to put police officers in schoolsFebruary 3, 2015 – Segment 2

We examine the role of police in schools, in light of the video that went viral last week of an officer interacting violently with Baltimore middle school students. We will also examine Delegate John Cluster’s (R-8th District) proposed bill to put armed school resource officers in all Maryland schools.

With: Mo Canady, Executive Director of NASRO, National Association of School Resource Officers; Sara Love, Public Policy Director of the ACLU of Maryland; Kate Rabb, Education Policy Director for Advocates for Children and Youth, who wrote an op-ed in the Baltimore Sun in response to the incident; Jenny Egan, Juvenile Public Defender in Baltimore City focusing on school-based arrests, who also wrote an op-ed in the Baltimore Sun in response to the incident; and Andrew Turner, Supervisor for Safe Schools for Wicomico County Public Schools.


February 3: This Day In History

Percival PrattisFebruary 3, 2015 – Segment 1

Marc talks about what happened on this day in history, including the day Percival Prattis became the first African American journalist to be allowed to sit in the press galleries of the U.S. Congress, and the 145th anniversary of the ratification of the 15th Amendment that guaranteed voting rights to all Americans regardless of race –- American men, that to is to be clear.

Transcript of this day in history is included below.

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Susie Day’s Snidelines: Talking Trash to Power

susie_dayFebruary 2, 2015 – Segment 3

Susie Day joins us to talk about her new book Snidelines: Talking Trash to Power, a collection of personal essays and political satire. Susie Day is a writer who specializes in prison issues.


Blues Artist Quinton “Q” Randall

qFebruary 2, 2015 – Segment 2

Baltimore blues artist Quinton “Q” Randall joins us to talk about his music and life. You can check him out on February 10th at the Ottobar with Sidewalk Chalk and J Pope N Funk Fridays and on February 11th in Jessup with Poet Mosaic.

 


Wes Moore’s The Work: My Search for a Life That Matters

mooreFebruary 2, 2015 – Segment 1

We listen to a conversation Marc had last week at the Enoch Pratt Free Library with Wes Moore about his new book The Work: My Search for a Life That Matters. From the author of the bestselling The Other Wes Moore comes the story of how Moore traced a path through the world to discover the meaning of his life and how he found that meaning in service. He tells stories about the people he met along the way and the remarkable change makers who’ve found deep meaning in their work. Their lessons, as well as his own experiences, show that our truest work happens when our personal talents and ambitions meet the needs of the world around us.

Wes Moore is a Rhodes Scholar who also served as an Army Officer in Afghanistan and worked as a special assistant to Secretary Condoleezza Rice at the State Department as a White House Fellow.


Annapolis Summit 2015: Maryland Senate President Miller & House Speaker Busch

Miller and BuschJanuary 30, 2015 – Segment 3

It’s the 12th Annual Annapolis Summit! Each year Marc interviews Maryland’s top elected officials about the important legislative issues facing our state. In this segment, we hear Marc’s interview with Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller, Jr. and House Speaker Michael Busch.


Annapolis Summit 2015: Maryland Attorney General Brian Frosh

Attorney General Brian FroshJanuary 30, 2015 – Segment 2

It’s the 12th Annual Annapolis Summit! Each year Marc interviews Maryland’s top elected officials about the important legislative issues facing our state. In this segment, we hear Marc’s interview with Attorney General Brian Frosh.


Annapolis Summit 2015: Maryland Governor Larry Hogan

Governor Larry HoganJanuary 30, 2015 – Segment 1

It’s the 12th Annual Annapolis Summit! Each year Marc interviews Maryland’s top elected officials about the important legislative issues facing our state. In this segment, we hear Marc’s interview with Governor Larry Hogan.


Art-Part’heid: Bridging the Gap of Disparities in the Baltimore Art Scene

Station North Arts and Entertainment DistrictJanuary 29, 2015 – Segment 4

We discuss an important event this Sunday at the 2640 Space: Art-Part’heid: Bridging the Gap of Disparities in the Baltimore Art Scene, a panel discussion and community dialogue on race, power, privilege, exclusion and shared wealth.

With: Mia Loving Curator and Founder of Invisible Majority, a creative community incubator; Michelle Gomez, independent curator who works collaboratively with under-represented audiences on community-focused exhibitions in Baltimore; Sophia Mak, artist, dancer, performer, educator, activist, and Program Manager at 901 Arts, a youth community arts organization; and Abdu Ali, musician and writer.


What Does The Greek Election Mean For The Economy?

GreeceJanuary 29, 2015 – Segment 3

We examine the economic situation in Greece, with: Bhaskar Sunkara, founding editor of Jacobin and a senior editor at In These Times; Kostis Papadantonakis, retired Professor of Economics, Community College of Baltimore County; Mark Weisbrot, Co-Director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research in Washington, D.C., President of Just Foreign Policy, and co-author of Social Security: The Phony Crisis.


Bhopal Activists In Baltimore To Discuss Biggest Man-Made Industrial Disaster In History

bhopalJanuary 29, 2015 – Segment 2

We hear a special preview of the Baltimore premiere of Bhopal: A Prayer for Rain.” This powerful documentary exposes the shocking events that led to the biggest man-made industrial disaster in history, when as many as 10,000 people were killed in one night. With: Dr. Patricia Santosham, Baltimore physician and Executive Producer of the film; and Sanjay Verma, Bhopal disaster survivor, activist and photographer for the Bhopal Medical Appeal and The International Campaign for Justice in Bhopal.

“Bhopal: A Prayer for Rain” will be screened Saturday, January 31, 2015 from 2:00 to 5:00pm at the The Arellano Theater at Levering Hall on the Johns Hopkins University Homewood Campus.


January 29: This Day in History

Oprah-WinfreyJanuary 29, 2015 – Segment 1

Marc shares some of the events that happened on this day in history, including the publication of The Raven by Edgar Allan Poe in 1834, the death of H.L. Mencken and the birth of Oprah Winfrey.

A transcript of this day in history is included below.

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The Hemingses of Monticello: An American Family

SallyHemingsJanuary 28, 2015 – Segment 4

Scholar Annette Gordon-Reed joins Marc to discuss her book called The Hemingses of Monticello: An American Family, which follows the family of Sally Hemings, who was enslaved by Thomas Jefferson and bore his children. What is the historical significance of this family?  What lingering doubts remain about the veracity of the claim that Jefferson fathered children with Sally Hemings?

 


Jewish Music Special: The Shondes

shondesJanuary 28, 2015 – Segment 3

In the second part of a two part series on Jewish music, producer Mark Gunnery speaks to two founding members of the Brooklyn-based rock group the Shondes, Louisa Solomon, lead vocalist and bassist Louisa Solomon, and Eli Oberman, who plays violin and sings harmony. They discuss their music, the ethics of political engagement as musicians and Jews, and their support of the cultural boycott of Israel.

Click here to listen to the first part of this series, an interview with the Klezmatics.


Jewish Music Special: The Klezmatics

KlezmaticsJanuary 28, 2015 – Segment 2

Marc Steiner Show producer Mark Gunnery presents a two part special on Jewish music. In this first installment, he speaks with members of the Klezmatics, one of the most popular klezmer bands in the US. Band members Lorin Sklamberg and Frank London discuss Yiddish culture and music, Jewish spirituality and politics, and the cultural boycott of Israel.

Click here to listen to the second part of this series, an interview with the Shondes.


January 28: This Day in History

zoraJanuary 28, 2015 – Segment 1

Marc shares some of the events that happened on this day in history, including the death of Zora Neale Hurston, the birth of Cuban poet, journalist and theorist José Martí, and and the foundation of the Free African Society in Philadelphia in 1787.

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Sound Bites: Governor Hogan’s Environmental Policies | Carole Morrison’s Expanding Vision For Agriculture On Delmarva

chickenJanuary 27, 2015 – Segment 4

It’s a brand new episode of Sound Bites, the series about our food and our world. In this episode we examine changes in Maryland’s environmental and agricultural policy under new Governor Larry Hogan. With: Elaine Lutz, attorney for the Maryland Office of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation; Ann Jones, director of Partners for Open Space; and Gerald Winegrad, attorney and Adjunct Professor at the University of Maryland School of Public Policy where he has taught a graduate course on Chesapeake Bay Restoration since 1988.

Then, we’re joined by Carole Morison, poultry farmer and owner of Bird’s Eye View Farm in Pocomoke City, joins us to talk about the expansion of her farm and crowd sourcing campaign.


CIA Officer Jeffrey Sterling Found Guilty On All Counts

sterlingJanuary 27, 2015 – Segment 3

We examine the verdict released yesterday in the case of Jeffrey Sterling, the ex-CIA agent accused of releasing classified information to reporter James Risen. Sterling was convicted on all nine counts. We talk with Marcy Wheeler, “Right to Know” investigative journalist for ExposeFacts and blogger at emptywheel.net. Wheeler writes widely about the legal aspects of the “war on terror” and its effects on civil liberties.

 


Do Baltimore Teens Face Worse Conditions Than Their Nigerian Counterparts?

Youth-JailJanuary 27, 2015 – Segment 2

Do poor teens in Baltimore face worse conditions than their counterparts in Nigeria, as a recent study suggests? We look at the study, published in December’s Journal of Adolescent Health, with: Dr. Kristin Mmari, Assistant Professor in the Department of Population, Family and Reproductive Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health; Dr. Lawrence Brown, public health consultant and Assistant Professor of Public Health in the School of Community Health and Policy at Morgan State University; and Dr. Roni Ellington, Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at Morgan State University.


January 27: This Day in History

Mahalia Jackson SingsJanuary 27, 2015 – Segment 1

Marc shares some of the events that happened on this day in history, including the deaths of Mahalia Jackson and Pete Seeger, the liberation of Auschwitz, and the 1969 Eldon Avenue Axle Plant wildcat strike.

 

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International News Roundup: Middle East, Saudi Arabia & Yemen

Saudia ArabiaJanuary 26, 2015 – Segment 4

We close out the show with a look at events in the Middle East. Our panel of guests includes: Dr. Hussein Ibish, Senior Fellow at the American Task Force for Palestine; Dr. Thabit A.j. Abdullah, Associate Professor of Middle East History and Associate Dean for External Relations at York University, Toronto, and author of many books including A Short History Of Iraq; and Rachel Bronson, Senior Fellow for Global Energy at The Chicago Council on Global Affairs.

 


Lead-Up to the Annapolis Summit: Governor Larry Hogan’s First Budget

Governor Larry HoganJanuary 26, 2015 – Segment 3

In our Lead-Up to the Annapolis Summit, our guests weigh in with their thoughts on Governor Larry Hogan’s first budget, which he announced last week. With: Charles Robinson, Political and Business Correspondent For Maryland Public Television; Greg Kline, Attorney, Co-founder And Contributing Editor ForRed Maryland, Host Of The Conservative Refugee podcast and Co-host Of Red Maryland Radio; and Phylicia Porter, President and Founder of Optimal Public Health Solutions.

Join me on January 30th at the Governor Calvert House in Annapolis for the 12th Annual Annapolis Summit, in partnership with The Daily Record. I will interview Maryland’s top political leaders about issues in the Maryland 2015 Legislative Session, including Governor Larry Hogan, Attorney General Brian Frosh, Senate President Mike Miller and House Speaker Michael Busch. For information, tickets, and sponsorship opportunities, go towww.thedailyrecord.com/Annapolis-Summit or call Clare Sheehan at 443-524-8101 or email clare.sheehan@thedailyrecord.com.


Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake: Plastic Bag Ban Reintroduced & More

Mayor Stephanie Rawlings BlakeJanuary 26, 2015 – Segment 2

Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake joins us to offer her vision for Baltimore and answer your questions. We talk about the plastic bag ban bill being reintroduced by the City Council and more.


January 26: This Day In History

Angela DavisJanuary 26, 2015 – Segment 1

Marc talks about what happened on this day in history, including the birthday of the first Black woman pilot Bessie Coleman, the birthday of political activist Angela Davis, and the day the Apollo Theater in Harlem reopened.

Transcript of this day in history included below.

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Howard Fuller and Danique Dolly on the Future of Education

fullerJanuary 23, 2015 – Segment 3

We look at The Future of Education. Our guests are: Howard Fuller, Distinguished Professor of Education, Founder/Director of the Institute for the Transformation of Learning at Marquette University in Milwaukee, and author of No Struggle No Progress: A Warrior’s Life, From Black Power To Education Reform; and Danique Dolly, Principal of City Neighbors Charter School. Marc will be moderating a panel tomorrow, January 24, at the 5th Annual Progressive Education Summit. For more information on the conference go to cityneighborsfoundation.org/


Theatre Baltimore: One Night in Miami

aliJanuary 23, 2015 – Segment 2

We take a peek at the thought-provoking, inspirational and entertaining production currently playing at Baltimore’s Center Stage:  One Night in Miami. The play is a fictional account of an actual event, a conversation between Cassius Clay (the night before he announced his new name, Muhammad Ali), Malcolm X, Jim Brown, and Sam Cooke, in a hotel room in 1964 Miami, the night of Clay’s first defeat of Sonny Liston. With: playwright Kemp Powers; Director Kwame Kwei-Armah OBE,Center Stage Artistic Director; and actors Sullivan Jones who plays Cassius Clay and Esau Pritchett who plays Jim Brown.


Why Does Baltimore Have So Many Confederate Monuments?

Lee-Jackson equestrian statueJanuary 23, 2015 – Segment 1

Happy Friday, everyone! We begin our show with a special historical piece produced by Marc Steiner Show producer Stefanie Mavronis: Confederate Monuments in Baltimore.

Partial transcript included below.

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The Million Gun Victims March: Local Artist Kimberly Sheridan Speaks on Gun Violence and Art

bcp-kimberly-sheridan-has-dedicated-her-life-to-bringing-victims-of-gun-violence-to-light-through-portra-20141110January 22, 2015 – Segment 5

Marc is joined by artist Kimberly Sheridan (right), the Pigtown resident who is using her art to speak out against gun violence.  Sheridan has committed herself to painting the portraits of all of the victims of gun violence in Baltimore, a projects she calls  “The Million Gun Victims March”.  We are also joined by Pastor Richard McNair of the Wayman Memorial AME Church, where Kimberly’s work is being displayed through this Saturday, January 24, 10am-4pm.  Wayman Memorial AME Church is located at 1305 Washington Blvd. in Baltimore


Sister’s Soul: Celebrating the Resiliency of Women in the Performing Arts

NavashDyaJanuary 22, 2015 – Segment 4

We offer a preview of an important event at Baltimore’s Eubie Blake Center this Saturday, part of the Iwa Pele Music Series: “Sister’s Soul: Celebrating the Resiliency of Women in the Performing Arts.” With: Navasha Daya, singer, songwriter, producer, cultural arts and spiritual activist, Co-Founder/ Director of the Healing & Performing Arts at the Youth Resiliency Institute, and Founder of the Daya World, LLC.


Watching and Waiting: Will Governor Larry Hogan’s Budget Make Good On Promise Of Bi-Partisan Leadership?

Hgn-Inag2015January 22, 2015 – Segment 3

As Larry Hogan is sworn in as the 62nd Governor of Maryland, we take a look at his upcoming budget proposals, and what Republican leadership in Annapolis will mean for the future of Maryland’s residents.  Marc is joined by Charles Robinson, political and business correspondent for Maryland Public Television.


Dr.Larry Egbert and the Right-to-Die Debate

indexJanuary 22, 2015 – Segment 2

We discuss the case of 87 year-old Dr. Larry Egbert, a former Baltimore anesthesiologists who was stripped of his license by the Maryland Board of Physicians, due to his involvement with right-to-die group Final Exit Network.  Marc talks to Dr. Larry Egbert about his work, his faith and what it means to die with dignity.

Jan


January 22: This Day in History

MI0001331416January 22, 2015 – Segment 1

Marc shares some of the events that happened on this day in history including the anniversary of the Roe v. Wade decision, the life of 19th century African American entrepreneur Barney Lancelot Ford, and the Anglo-Zulu war which began on this day in 1879.

This day in history transcript included below.

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