The Marc Steiner Show

Show Podcasts

City Paper This Week: The College Issue

City PaperSeptember 2, 2015 – Segment 4

We close our show with our regular feature City Paper This Week, with Anna WalshCity Paper Managing Editor and Eats & Drinks Editor.


Kane Mayfield: On Baltimore and His New Music

Kane MayfieldSeptember 2, 2015 – Segment 3

We talk with rapper Kane Mayfield, who will be performing Friday September 4th, at the Metro Gallery in Baltimore.


NPR’s Anya Kamenetz on Education and Testing

Anya KamenetzSeptember 2, 2015 – Segment 2

We discuss Education and Testing, with NPR’s lead education blogger Anya Kamenetz.

On Wednesday, September 2, I will be moderating a panel hosted by the Maryland State Education Association, “Less Testing, More Learning,” at the Roland Park Elementary/Middle School. The event is free and open to the public. Click here to register. 


The Black Lives Matter Movement & The Civil Rights Movement

Photo Credit: russell howze via FlickrSeptember 2, 2015 – Segment 1

We begin our show with a discussion about the Black Lives Matter movement and the Civil Rights Movement: differences, tensions, and connections. Our panel of guests will be responding in part to an op-ed in the Washington Post last week, written by Civil Rights activist Barbara Reynolds, “I was a civil rights activist in the 1960s. But it’s hard for me to get behind Black Lives Matter.”

Our panel will include: Kalima Young, Director of the Baltimore Art + Justice Project, a project of the Office of Community Engagement at the Maryland Institute College of Art; the Rev. Dr. Heber Brown, Pastor of Pleasant Hope Baptist Church and Executive Director of Orita’s Cross Freedom School; and John Milton Wesley, author, songwriter, and Senior Fellow in Social Marketing with the National Center for Health Behavioral Change at Morgan State University.


D Watkins: The Beast Side: Living and Dying While Black in America

D WatkinsSeptember 1, 2015 – Segment 4

We speak with author and filmmaker D Watkins about his new book The Beast Side: Living and Dying While Black in America. D Watkins’ book release event will be at the Union Baptist Church of Baltimore (1219 Druid Hill Ave) Wednesday, September 9 at 7:00 PM.


Zoe Carpenter on the National Elections

via TheNation.comSeptember 1, 2015 – Segment 3

Zoe Carpenter, Assistant Washington Editor for The Nation, joins us to offer a commentary on the national elections.


A Conversation with Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake

via Patrick Semansky for Associated PressSeptember 1, 2015 – Segment 2

Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake joins us for a conversation on the state of the city.


Legal Aspects of the Freddie Gray Case

Algerina Perna via Baltimore SunSeptember 1, 2015 – Segment 1

On Wednesday, a hearing will be held to determine certain legal issues in the Freddie Gray case, such as a change of venue and whether to remove Baltimore State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby from the prosecution.

We have an examination and analysis of these issues, with: Doug Colbert, University of Maryland Law School professor and co-chair of the Society of American Law Teachers’ (SALT) Access to Justice Curriculum Project; and A. Dwight Pettit, defense attorney who has represented clients in police misconduct cases.


Local News Roundtable: Upcoming Trials Connected To Freddie Gray, Dirt Bikes In The City & Beyond

Baltimore City Courthouse. Photo credit: Jimmy Emerson, DVM via FlickrAugust 31, 2015 – Hour 2

On our Local News Roundtable we discuss the Freddie Gray trial, dirt bikes in the city, and beyond.

With: Dr. Lawrence Brown, public health consultant and Assistant Professor of Public Health in the School of Community Health and Policy at Morgan State University; political consultant Phil Tran; and Dr. Roni Ellington, Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at Morgan State University.


National News Roundtable: Police Deputy Shot In Texas, 2016 Presidential Election & Iran

Photo Credit: indigoprime via CompfightAugust 31, 2015 – Hour 1

We begin the week with a National News Roundtable. Our panel of guests discuss a range of national topics including the 2016 Presidential Election.

With: Bill Fletcher, Senior Scholar at Institute for Policy Studies; ER Shipp, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, Journalist-in-Residence and Associate Professor of Journalism at Morgan State University; and Lenny McAllister, Republican strategist, former congressional candidate, and host of NightTalk: Get To The Point on the Pittsburgh cable news channel and Get Right with Lenny McAllister on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA in Pittsburgh.


Reflecting On The 10 Years Since Hurricane Katrina

"Honoring Those Still Missing" (Photo Credit: Craig Morse via Flickr)August 28, 2015 – Segment 2

Listen to a special Marc Steiner Show / Center for Emerging Media presentation: 10 Years Since Hurricane Katrina. You will hear the diverse voices of a number of individuals from and/or living in the Crescent City, most of whom lived through the storm.

With: Tracie Washington, President of Louisiana Justice Institute; James Perry, New Orleanian and former Director of the Greater New Orleans Fair Housing Action Center; Jordan Flaherty, New Orleans-based journalist, author of the book Floodlines: Community and Resistance from Katrina to the Jena Six, and creator of the new short documentary film New Orleans: Recovery or Removal (which can be seen at GRITTV.org); Kristina Kay Robinson, writer, artist, and New Orleans native; Karen Gadbois, founder and reporter at The Lens, New Orleans’ first investigative news non-profit; Adam Karlin, freelance journalist and travel writer in New Orleans; Ellis Marsalis III, photographer and native New Orleanian; Tara Conley, Social Media Manager at Race Forward, Producer of Kellen and Katrina, and Brackish: A Visual Ethnography of Hurricane Katrina; and Kellen, musician and subject of the film Kellen and Katrina


Tengella’s Take: The NFL Delusion!

Koli TengellaAugust 28, 2015 – Segment 1

We begin the show with our weekly feature Tengella’s Take with Koli Tengella. Koli is President of Tengella Edutainment, an instructor and creator of the Positive Social Change Performing Arts Program at Augusta Fells Savage Institute of Visual Arts High School, and he was a 2010 Open Society Institute Fellow.


Sound Bites: GMOs, Herbicides & Public Health | The State Of Oyster Farming & The Challenges Facing Oyster Farmers

Oysters, Photo Credit: chesbayprogram via CompfightAugust 27, 2015 – Segment 2

On the newest episode of our series about our food and our world, Sound Bites, we begin the hour with a report on the potential public health consequences of GMOs (genetically-modified organisms), with Dr. Charles Benbrook, co-author of “GMOs, Herbicides, and Public Health” in the New England Journal of Medicine. Dr. Benbrook is an adjunct faculty member at Washington State University.

Then, we turn to the state of oyster farming in our region as we discuss the challenges facing oyster farmers. With: Donald Webster, Region Extension Specialist at the University of Maryland Wye Research and Education Center and Chairman of the Aquaculture Coordinating Council and Maryland Oyster Advisory Commission; Johnny Shockley, third generation waterman, born and raised on Hoopers Island, and co-founder of Hooper’s Island Oyster Aquaculture Company; and Tim Wheeler, B’More Green, Baltimore Sun’s environmental reporter.


Revolutionary MC Boots Riley

bootsAugust 27, 2015 – Segment 1

Boots Riley of the legendary hip hop group The Coup joins us to talk about hip hop, politics, and his cousin Carlos Riley, who was falsely accused of shooting a Durham police office. His latest book, Boots Riley: Tell Homeland Security-We Are the Bomb, brings together his songs, commentary, and backstories with compelling photos and documents.


This Week in the City Paper: The Screens Issue

citypaperAugust 26, 2015 – Segment 4

We close out the show with our regular feature This Week in the City Paper, with Anna Walsh, Managing Editor and Eats and Drinks Editor for the Baltimore City Paper.

Sankofa African Bazaar Essay Contest

sankofaAugust 26, 2015 – Segment 3

We have an update on a Charles Village institution, Sankofa African Bazaar. In an interesting twist, Sankofa owner KiKi Armstrong is preparing to retire and is seeking a future owner with the skills, knowledge, and passion to keep the content and destination experience of this exclusive shop intact. To ensure that this objective is met, she is holding a contest. Candidates are encouraged to enter Sanfoka’s contest by completing a simple questionnaire located on their website at www.sankofaafricanbazaar.com. We’re joined by: Esther “KiKi” Armstrong, owner of Sankofa.

Benjamin Banneker Eubie Blake Arts and Sciences Academy

bbAugust 26, 2015 – Segment 2

We feature a very special Baltimore City boys school that is seeking enrollees: Benjamin Banneker Eubie Blake Arts and Sciences Academy, located in the old Winston Middle School building in Baltimore’s Winston neighborhood. We speak with Banneker Principal Patrick McDonald.
NOTE: The Banneker Blake Arts and Sciences Academy still has space available for 6th grade boys. If you are interested, please contact Principal Patrick McDonald by phone at 443-623-9239 or by email atpmcdonald@bcps.k12.md.us

Sheila Dixon’s Vision for Baltimore

Sheila DixonAugust 26, 2015 – Segment 1

Former Baltimore Mayor and current candidate for Mayor Sheila Dixon joins us to talk about her vision for our city.


Changes to Zoning Regulation in Baltimore

zoningAugust 25, 2015 – Segment 2

We turn to zoning in Baltimore, as developers and community groups are pressuring the City Council to bring the first major rewrite to the Baltimore City zoning code since 1971. With: Rich Hall, Executive Director of Citizens Planning and Housing Association (CPHA); Al Barry, principal of Baltimore land-planning firm AB Associates and member of the Baltimore Development Workgroup steering committee; Councilpeople Mary Pat Clarke and Carl Stokes; and Dru Schmidt-Perkins, President and CEO of 1000 Friends of Maryland.


Baltimore’s Rising Murder Rate

homicide August 25, 2015 – Segment 1

We look at Baltimore’s rising murder rate. Is there something going on particular to Baltimore or is this part of a national trend? Our panel of guests includes: Clayton Guyton, Executive Director of the Rose Street Community Center and former correctional officer; Ray Cook, community activist and youth advocate who works with youth in Poplar Grove; and Tara Huffman, Director of the Criminal and Juvenile Justice Program for OSI-Baltimore.


Local Roundtable: Marilyn Mosby, the Mayoral Race, and More

mosbyAugust 24, 2015 – Segment 2

We host a local news roundtable and speak about State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby and the mayoral race in Baltimore. With: Catalina Byrd, media consultant, political strategist, and co-host of No Hooks for the Hip-Hop Chronicles on WEAA; Dayvon Love, Director of Research and Public Policy for Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle; and Doug Ward, Director of Johns Hopkins University’s Division of Public Safety Leadership.


National Roundtable: Sanders, Trump, and the 2016 Presidential Election

berniebernieAugust 24, 2015 – Segment 1

We host a national news roundtable and speak about Bernie Sanders, Donald Trump, and the 2016 Presidential elections. With: Dr. Kimberly Moffitt, Associate Professor of American Studies at University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) and co-Editor of Blackberries and Redbones: Critical Articulations of Black Hair/Body Politics in Africana CommunitiesDr. Tara Bynum, Assistant Professor in the Department of English at Towson University; and Eugene Craig III, grassroots activist and 3rd Vice-Chair of the Maryland Republican State Party.


From The Archives: Martha Cooper On Documenting The Birth Of Hip-Hop Culture

Martha CooperAugust 21, 2015 – Segment 4

We close out the show with a special archive edition of The Marc Steiner Show as we listen back to my 2010 interview with photographer Martha Cooper, best known for documenting the birth of hip hop culture in New York City in the 1970’s and early 80’s.


Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz: Continuing The Conversation On ‘An Indigenous People’s History Of The US’

An Indigenous People's History of the USAugust 21, 2015 – Segment 3

I talk with Native American author, historian, feminist, and self-described revolutionary Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, whose seminal book An Indigenous People’s History of the United States was just released in paperback.


Comedian Hari Kondabolu On Waiting For 2042, Coming To Baltimore

Hari KondaboluAugust 21, 2015 – Segment 2

We are joined by stand-up comedian Hari Kondabolu, whose debut album is called Waiting for 2042. Kondabolu will perform at the Creative Alliance on Sunday. The Creative Alliance website describes him as “A fearless political comedian, [who] tackles social issues in the confrontational spirit of Lenny Bruce and Richard Pryor, with a voice all his own.”

Tengella’s Take: I Ain’t Afraid Of No Gay People!

Koli TengellaAugust 21, 2015 – Segment 1

We begin the show with our usual weekly feature, Tengella‘s Take with Koli Tengella. Koli is President of Tengella Edutainment, an instructor and creator of the positive social change performing arts program at Augusta Fells Savage Institute of Visual Arts High School, and was a 2010 Open Society Institute Fellow.


Sound Bites: Natasha Bowens’ ‘The Color of the Food’ | Race And Agriculture

August 20, 2015 – Segment 2bowens

In our latest episode of Sound Bites, our series on our food and our world, we are joined by Natasha Bowens. Bowens is a beginning farmer and community grower in Western Maryland, who wrote the book The Color of Food: Stories of Race, Resilience and Farming. She will present her book Thursday night, August 20th at 7:30pm at Red Emma’s Bookstore Coffeehouse, and this September at the Baltimore Book Festival.

Later, Natasha Bowens is joined by local farmer Denzel Mitchell of Five Seeds Farm and Apiary in Baltimore to talk about the ways that race intersects with agriculture and the food movement.


Remembering Longtime Civil Rights Leader Julian Bond & The Critical Years Of The Civil Rights Movement

**FILE** This July 8, 2007 file photo shows NAACP Chairman Julian Bond addressing the civil rights organization's annual convention in Detroit. Bond says he will not seek re-election as chairman, a post he has held since 1998. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya, file)August 20, 2015 – Segment 1

Our guest host for the first hour is Dr. Lawrence Brown, public health consultant and Assistant Professor of Public Health in the School of Community Health and Policy at Morgan State University. We begin the show by remembering longtime Civil Rights leader Julian Bond, who died Sunday, and looking back at 1965 and 1966, which were critical years of the movement.

The panel of guests includes: Betty Robinson, former member of SNCC, co-editor of Hands on the Freedom Plow: Personal Accounts of Women in SNCC, and 2003 Open Society Institute Community Fellow; and Judy Richardson, former member of SNCC, filmmaker who worked on Eyes on the Prize, co-editor of Hands on the Freedom Plow: Personal Accounts by Women in SNCC, and board member of the SNCC Legacy Committee.


City Paper This Week: Race And Music In Baltimore

City PaperAugust 19, 2015 – Segment 4

We close out the show at with our regular feature City Paper This Week, with Anna Walsh, Managing Editor and Eats and Drinks Editor for the Baltimore City Paper.

 


Baltimore Musicians of Color Discuss Race In the Music Scene

August 19, 2015 – Segment 3burney

We look at Lawrence Burney’s article in City Paper, “Race and Music in Baltimore: Baltimore musicians of color talk about race in the music scene.

With: Lawrence Burney, founder and editor of True Laurels; Spike Arreaga of the band Natural Velvet; and Afia Lydia of the band DaikonDaikon.

 


The Complexity Of Straight Outta Compton

August 19, 2015 – Segment 2movie

Stay tuned for a discussion of Straight Outta Compton, the biographical film released last weekend about the hip hop group N.W.A. in the 1980s and 1990s.

With: Kalima Young, Director of the Baltimore Art + Justice Project, a project of the Office of Community Engagement at the Maryland Institute College of Art; and Lawrence Burney, Founder and Editor of True Laurels, who compiled a feature on race and music in Baltimore for this week’s City Paper.

 


Black Lives Matter, Bernie Sanders & The Presidential Election

August 19, 2015 – Segment 1

blacklivesmatter

We begin the show with a roundtable discussion on the Black Lives Matter movement, Bernie Sanders, and the Presidential Election in collaboration with The Nation magazine.

With: Kai Wright, Features Editor for The Nation, where he wrote “Black Lives Matter Is a Demand, Not a Plea;” Farajii Muhammad, host of Listen Up! on WEAA 88.9 FM and Youth Empowerment Coordinator for the American Friends Service Committee in Baltimore; Washington State Senator Pramila Jayapal, who has represented District 37 in the Washington State Senate since January 2015 and who wrote “Why the Bernie Sanders Rally Left Me Heartbroken” for Huffington Post; and Ericka Blount Danois, award-winning journalist, writer, editor and professor who wrote “Bernie Sanders, Black Lives Matter and the Search for a Black Agenda” in The Root.


An Die Musik Presents: Sunny Cowell & Stanley Cowell

Sunny CowellAugust 18, 2015 – Segment 3

We close out the show with a preview of a special musical event, happening August 29: An Die Musik Presents Sunny Cowell CD Release Concert & Party.

With: Sunny Cowell on voice & guitar; and Stanley Cowell, who will play piano at the concert.


Upsurge In Violence In Baltimore With 208 Homicides & Governor Hogan’s Closing Of Baltimore City Detention Center

August 18, 2015 – Segment 2violence

We address the upsurge in violence in Baltimore. So far, there have been 208 homicides in Baltimore. The 2014 year-end total was 2011. What’s going on? And how do we address it?

With: Baltimore poet, writer and activist Avon Bellamy Sr.; and Tara Huffman, Director, Criminal and Juvenile Justice Program for OSI-Baltimore.

Then, Diamonte Brown, director of Out for Justice and co-chair of the Unlock the Vote Coalition; and Luke Broadwater, Reporter for the Baltimore Sun, also join the conversation to discuss Governor Hogan’s closing of the Baltimore City Detention Center.


International Roundtable: Iran, Turkey & The Middle East

August 18, 2015 – Segment 1middleast

We begin our show with an International Roundtable on the Middle East, focusing on Iran and Turkey.

With: Phyllis Bennis, Director of the New Internationalism Project at the Institute for Policy Studies; and Dr. Steven David, Professor in the Department of Political Science at Johns Hopkins University.


Local News Roundtable: Rawlings-Blake V. Dixon, Dirt Bikes And Street Culture & More

August 17, 2015 – Segment 2blake

We bring the discussion home with a Local News Roundtable, topics to include: Rawlings-Blake v. Dixon for Mayor; dirt bikes, street culture and the police; murders in our city; and Are Baltimore schools ready for the start of the year?

With: Dr. Roni Ellington, Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at Morgan State University; Charles Robinson, Political and Business Correspondent For Maryland Public Television; Roberto Alejandro, reporter for Baltimore’s Afro-American newspaper; and longtime citizen activist Kim Trueheart.


National News Roundtable: Election 2016

August 17, 2015 – Segment 1debate

We begin the show with a National News Roundtable on Election 2016, topics including: the Republican Debate; Donald Trump’s comments on money and women; racial justice, O’Malley and Sanders; and Hillary Clinton and Black women.

With: Dr. Mileah Kromer, Director of the Sarah T. Hughes Field Politics Center and Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science and International Relations at Goucher College; Eugene Craig III, grassroots activist and 3rd Vice-Chair of the Maryland Republican State Party; and Edward Wyckoff Williams, Contributing Editor at The Root and Political Contributor and Special Correspondent with Al Jazeera America.


Marc Steiner Presents … The Hip Hop Chronicles

August 14, 2015 – Segment 2mike

It is a special presentation of the Hip Hop Chronicles, produced by Mike “Nyce” Middleton, one of our creative and talented colleagues at WEAA 88.9-FM. The show combines current and classic socially conscious music and conversation to address the political and social issues affecting the Hip-Hop generation, featuring in-depth conversations with political analysts, social activists, and community leaders.


Tengella’s Take: You Wish You Had It, African/Black Body Haters!

Serena WilliamsAugust 14, 2015 – Segment 1

We begin our show with our weekly feature, Tengella‘s Take with Koli Tengella. Koli is President of Tengella Edutainment, an instructor and creator of the Positive Social Change Performing Arts Program at Augusta Fells Savage Institute of Visual Arts High School, and was a 2010 Open Society Institute Fellow.


Sound Bites: The Launch Of The Black Church Food Security Network

Black Church Food Security NetworkAugust 13, 2015 – Segment 3

We listen back to a recent episode of Sound Bites, our series on our food and our world, about an exciting and important new initiative that was launched this summer in Baltimore: The Black Church Food Security Network. With: Bishop J. L. Carter, Pastor of the Ark Church; the Rev. Dr. Heber Brown, Pastor of Pleasant Hope Baptist Church and Executive Director of Orita’s Cross Freedom School; and the Rev. Darriel Harris, Project Officer of the Baltimore Food & Faith Project at Johns Hopkins’ Center for a Livable Future.

 


Author Terry McMillan Talks ‘Getting To Happy’

Terry McMillanAugust 13, 2015 – Segment 2

We travel back to 2010 when I interviewed author Terry McMillan about her sequel to 1992’s Waiting to Exhale, called Getting to Happy.  The novel picks up 15 years after the exploits of friends Bernadine, Savannah, Robin and Gloria first appeared in print. McMillan joined us to talk about her writing process, how she came to revisit her old characters, and how her own life shaped the story that she wrote.


Textile Artist Sonya Clark: On Sculpting With Human Hair

Sonya ClarkAugust 13, 2015 – Segment 1

We begin the show with my 2009 interview with textile artist Sonya Clark, who had an exhibit at the Walters Art Museum featuring sculptures made of human hair. Do you run your hands happily through your lover’s hair, but cringe when you find one of their hairs on your pillow or in a dish they have prepared for you? Do you spend hundreds of dollars on fancy salons and designer gels and shampoos to achieve that “just rolled out of bed” look? Is your hair more important to you than you might like to admit? These are just a few of the tensions that Clark’s work evokes.

Author Laura Lippman: I’d Know You Anywhere

August 12, 2015 – Segment 2laura

Then we talk with Baltimore native and New York Times best-selling author Laura Lippman, who joined us in 2010 for a discussion about her novel I’d Know You Anywhere. Lippman’s works have won the Agatha, Anthony, Edgar, Nero, Gumshoe and Shamus Awards.

 


The Latino Community and the Justice System

August 12, 2015 – Segment 1court

We begin the show with a special archive edition from 2009, part of our Urbanite Radio Stories series in partnership with the Urbanite magazine. The topic of the show is The Latino Community and the Justice System and we explore what happens when members of the Latino community become victims of crime but fail to report it out of fear of the police and legal system.

With: Major Roger Bergeron, Commander of the Baltimore Southeastern Police District; Evelyn Vargas, a bilingual advocate in the Baltimore City State’s Attorney’s Office; and Elizabeth Alex, Senior Manager of the Baltimore office of Casa de Maryland.


Philosopher’s Roundtable: Exploring Institutional Racism

jimAugust 11, 2015 – Segment 3

It’s another Philosopher’s Roundtable, on Defining and Exploring Institutional Racism. “Institutional racism” is a term often used but not often clearly defined. We look at its definition and historical roots, especially as they relate to today.

Our panel of guests includes: A. Adar Ayira, Project Manager of the More in the Middle Initiative at Associated Black Charities and facilitator and analyst at Baltimore Racial Justice Action, a program of Fusion Partnerships; Doug Colbert,University of Maryland Law School professor and co-chair of the Society of American Law Teachers’ (SALT) Access to Justice Curriculum Project; Michael Higginbotham, Wilson H. Elkins Professor of Law at the University of Baltimore, and author of Ghosts of Jim Crow: Ending Racism in “Post-Racial” America; and freelance media maker Maegan La Mala Ortiz.


Nobel Peace Prize Winner Dr. Wangari Maathai on The Challenge for Africa

Wangari MaathaiAugust 11, 2015 – Segment 2

It’s a special 2009 archive edition of the Steiner Show, where Marc talks with Nobel Peace Prize winner Dr. Wangari Maathai, whose book The Challenge for Africa examines some of the biggest obstacles the continent faces and Dr. Maathai’s ideas about how to overcome them.


Taylor Branch’s ‘America In the King Years’

taylorAugust 11, 2015 – Segment 1

We begin the show with a rebroadcast of Marc’s interview with Pulitzer Prize-winning author and historian Taylor Branch, whose trilogy America in the King Years chronicles the life of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and the Civil Rights Movement.

 

 

 


Anthony Arthur’s ‘Radical Innocent: Upton Sinclair’

anthony arthurAugust 10, 2015 – Segment 3

We close the show with another Steiner Show archive, Marc’s interview with Anthony Arthur about his book Radical Innocent: Upton Sinclair.


Philosopher’s Roundtable: Do Things Happen For A Reason?

August 10, 2015 – Segment 2philosophy

The show continues with another Philosopher’s Roundtable! In this repeat broadcast from last year, we ask the question: Do Things Happen for a Reason?

Our panel of guests includes: Dr. Joe Pettit, Associate Professor and Religious Studies Advisor in the Department of Philosophy & Religious Studies at Morgan State University; the Rev. Dr. Todd Yeary, Senior Pastor at Douglas Memorial Community Church in Baltimore; and Dr. Nyasha Grayman-Simpson, Associate Professor of Psychology at Goucher College.


The Breakthrough: Politics and Race in the Age of Obama

August 10, 2015 – Segment 1gwen

We begin our show with a special archive edition from 2009, when Marc talked with Gwen Ifill, moderator and managing editor for Washington Weekand co-anchor and co-managing editor of PBS NewsHour, about her book The Breakthrough: Politics and Race in the Age of Obama. Her book examines the rising generation of Black political leaders, and explores the ways in which these young politicians could change American politics and significantly transform the Black political establishment.


Discussing Race & Class In The United States

classAugust 7, 2015 – Segment 3

We turn to a fascinating discussion from earlier this year, a Philosophers’ Roundtable on Race & Class In The United States.

With Dr. Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, Assistant Professor in Princeton University’s Center for African American Studies; and A. Adar Ayira, Project Manager of the More in the Middle Campaign for Associated Black Charities and facilitator and analyst at Baltimore Racial Justice Action, a program of Fusion Partnerships.

 


The Quilters Of Gee’s Bend, Alabama

quiltsAugust 7, 2015 – Segment 2

We have a special 2007 archive edition of The Marc Steiner Show: The Quilters of Gee’s Bend, Alabama.  With: Louisiana Bendolph and Mary Lee Bendolph, two of the quilters from Gee’s Bend; and Linda Day Clark, photographer who has photographed Gee’s Bend.


Tengella’s Take: Being Poor Is Not A Crime!

koliAugust 7, 2015 – Segment 1

We begin our show with our weekly feature, Tengella’s Take with Koli Tengella. Koli is President of Tengella Edutainment, an instructor and creator of the positive social change performing arts program at Augusta Fells Savage Institute of Visual Arts High School, and was a 2010 Open Society Institute Fellow.

 


Sound Bites: The Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act Under Fire | Critics Call It The “Deny Americans The Right To Know” Act

August 6, 2015 – Hour 2 – GMO

In our series about our food and our world, Sound Bites, we listen back to a recent episode where we debated and analyzed a controversial bill making its way through Congress, called The Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act. Anti-GMO (genetically-modified organisms) advocates are calling this the DARK (“Deny Americans the Right to Know”) Act because it would not require genetically-modified foods to be labeled as such. Another critical and far-reaching impact of this bill would be that it would overturn the mandatory labeling bills in places where GMOs are currently being labeled, and make it more difficult for state and local governments to regulate GMO plants.

We hear two different perspectives on The Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act: Will Saletan, who writes about politics, science and technology for Slate and created a piece called “Unhealthy Fixation: The Misleading War on GMOs. The Food is Safe. The Rhetoric is Dangerous;” and Colin O’Neil, who is the Director of Government Affairs for the Center for Food Safety.


How Women Experience Sexual Harassment Online

Latoya PetersonAugust 6, 2015 – Hour 1

We begin the show with an archive edition of The Marc Steiner Show on the topic of Cyber Sexual Harassment. The blogosphere can be a very hostile environment for female bloggers, readers and commenters. Our panel of guests talked about why so many women are experiencing harassment online, and what can be done to create safe spaces on the net.

With: Danielle Citron, Professor at the University of Maryland Law School whose research examines cyber gender harassment and the hostile environment that many women face online; Latoya Peterson, editor and blogger at racialicious.com, whose writing appears in the anthology Yes Means Yes: Visions of Female Sexual Power and a World Without Rape; and Jill Filipovic, blogger at feministe.us who has also written for the Huffington Post, Alternet, and The Yale Journal of Law and Feminism, and whose work also appears in Yes Means Yes: Visions of Female Sexual Power and a World Without Rape.


Appalachian Artists and Activists

mountainAugust 5, 2015 – Segment 3

In a special archive edition, we speak with artists, musicians, and activists from different parts of the southern Appalachian region about the intersections between their art and activism. This 2010 archive edition features: musician Walt Michael, Founder and Director of Common Ground On the Hill; Bluegrass musician Art Menius, former Director of Appalshop; musician Derek Mullins, Chairman of the Board of Appalshop; and Ellen Elmes, who is an artist, teacher, and activist from southern Virginia.


Poverty Since the Civil Rights Movement

baltimorepovertyAugust 5, 2015 – Segment 2

In an archive presentation that is relevant for today, we examine why poverty has continued to grow in cities since the Civil Rights Movement. Harvard sociologist William Julius Wilson spent over twenty years trying to determine why the poverty and desperation in America’s inner cities has grown since the height of the Civil Rights Movement. He discussed his book More Than Just Race: Being Black and Poor in the Inner City, which examines the factors contributing to this grim statistic.


Is Consumerism Bad For Us?

warehouseAugust 5, 2015 – Segment 1

We hear a special 2009 archive edition of The Marc Steiner Show, where we asked the question: Is Consumerism Bad For Us? We all work so hard to make money and then reward ourselves for our hard work by buying things – homes, cars, boats, clothes, good food.  But are we biologically ill-suited for consumerism?

Peter Whybrow thinks so, as he argued inThe Chronicle of Higher Education. We talked about the way we live our lives and how we could get off the hedonistic treadmill.


Guests of the Ayatollah: The First Battle in America’s War with Militant Islam

iran_hostagesAugust 4, 2015 – Segment 3

We hear a special archive edition of the show, as Marc talks with Mark Bowden, author of many books including Black Hawk Down, about his 2006 work Guests of the Ayatollah: The First Battle in America’s War with Militant Islam.


A Conversation With Author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Chimamanda Ngozi AdichieAugust 4, 2015 – Segment 2

We hear a special archive edition of The Marc Steiner Show from 2009; an interview with Nigerian-born award-winning author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, about her collection of short stories titled That Thing Around Your Neck.  This collection of 12 stories focuses mainly on the experiences of Nigerian woman, many of whom have emigrated to the United States and are struggling with their identity as immigrants.

 


Art, Politics, and Remix Culture: Paul Rucker and DJ Spooky

PaulRuckerAugust 4, 2015 – Segment 1

We listen back to a rebroadcast of a fascinating discussion we held last year on art, music, politics, the war on drugs, and remix culture. With Paul D. Miller, aka DJ Spooky, musician, writer, and conceptual artist; and Paul Rucker, visual artist, composer, and musician


Mencken: The American Iconoclast

H.L.-MenckenAugust 3, 2015 – Segment 3

We have a conversation about Baltimore icon H.L. Mencken. Author Marion Elizabeth Rodgers joins us to talk about her book Mencken: The American Iconoclast.


Scarred Justice: The Orangeburg Massacre of 1968

orangeburgAugust 3, 2015 – Segment 2

We feature a special 2009 archive edition of the Steiner Show, Scarred Justice: The Orangeburg Massacre of 1968. Marc speaks with Judy Richardson, director of a chilling documentary by that same name, about the 1968 massacre of black students at South Carolina State University.

 


Philosophers’ Roundtable: Critiquing Eurocentric Philosophy

Edward SaidAugust 3, 2015 – Segment 1

We examine the critique that in the U.S. we focus on Eurocentric philosophies, and feature philosophers who are working to change that reality.

Our roundtable panel includes:

  • Hamid Dabashi, Hagop Kevorkian Professor of Iranian Studies and Comparative Literature at Columbia University
  • Tsenay Serequeberhan, Professor in the Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies at Morgan State University
  • Desiree Melton, Associate Professor of Philosophy at College of Notre Dame of Maryland.

Beyond Swastika and Jim Crow: Jewish Refugee Scholars at Black Colleges

Ernst_Borinski1955July 31, 2015 – Segment 5

We hear a special archive edition of The Marc Steiner Show, where we explore a surprising alliance, during World War II, when many Jewish professors fled from Nazi Germany and were offered positions at historically black colleges. We discuss the intertwined history of African Americans and Jews with the curators of Beyond Swastika and Jim Crow: Jewish Refugee Scholars at Black Colleges, which was an exhibit at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum.

We hear from: John Milton Wesley, student of Jewish refugee scholar Dr. Ernst Borinski; Dr. Michelle Joan Wilkinson, Director of Collections and Exhibitions at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum; and Anita Kassof, Assistant Director at the Jewish Museum of Maryland.


Welcome to “Abu”-timore: A Celebration of Abu The Flutemaker

abuJuly 31, 2015 – Segment 4

We have a special segment with Abu the Flutemaker, a musical craftsman who recycles found objects into musical instruments. We’re also joined by Navasha Daya, singer, songwriter, co-Founder and Director of the Healing and Performing Arts at the Youth Resiliency Institute; and Fanon Hill, cultural organizer, co-Founder and Executive Director of the Youth Resiliency Institute, and trainer for the National Rites of Passage Institute.

You can watch these three artists in a live performance at Welcome to “Abu”-timore: A Celebration of Abu The Flutemaker, Saturday, August 15th, 2-4:30pm, at Morgan State University’s Murphy Fine Arts Center.


Comrade, Baltimore-Based Rapper & Activist

ComradeJuly 31, 2015 – Segment 3

Baltimore-based rapper and activist Comrade joins us to talk about his life and offer a preview of his CD release party at the Real News Network Friday night, July 31, 8-11pm.


Tengella’s Take: Sisters & Brothers, Let’s Work On Our Own Mess!

Koli TengellaJuly 31, 2015 – Segment 2

Listen to our weekly feature Tengella’s Take with Koli Tengella. Koli is President of Tengella Edutainment, an instructor and creator of the Positive Social  Change Performing Arts Program at Augusta Fells Savage Institute of Visual Arts High School, and was a 2010 Open Society Institute Fellow.


July 31: This Day in History

whitneyyoungJuly 31, 2015 – Segment 1

On this day in history, Muslims conquered Iberia and Whitney Young of the Urban League was born.

Transcript of This Day in History Included Below

Read More→


Sound Bites: Martin O’Malley | “Our Failed Food Movement”

omalleyJuly 30, 2015 – Segment 4

In our newest episode of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world, we look at the Maryland poultry industry’s criticism of former Governor Martin O’Malley’s stance on biofuel. With John Fritze, Washington Correspondent for the Baltimore Sun.

Then our panel of guests reflects upon an article in the Pacific Standard, “Our Failed Food Movement,” which asserts that in spite of calls for an end to industrial farming, the number of industrial farms continues to increase. With: Carole Morrison, poultry farmer and owner of Bird’s Eye View Farm in Pocomoke City; Nathanael Johnson, food writer for Grist, Lecturer at the University of California, Berkeley in the Graduate School of Journalism, and author of All Natural*: *A Skeptic’s Quest to Discover if the Natural Approach to Diet, Childbirth, Healing and the Environment Really Keeps us Healthier and Happier; and Jacqueline Patterson, Director of the NAACP Climate Justice Initiative.

 


Is Sheila Dixon Baltimore’s Marion Barry?

Sheila DixonJuly 30, 2015 – Segment 3

Dr. Kimberly Moffitt, Associate Professor of American Studies at University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) and co-editor of Blackberries and Redbones: Critical Articulations of Black Hair/Body Politics in Africana Communities, joins us as a guest host.

We address the question that a number of Baltimoreans have posed: Is Sheila Dixon Baltimore’s Marion Barry? With: Kim Trueheart, longtime citizen activist; and Dr. Linda Loubert, Assistant Professor in the Economics Department at Morgan State University.


Shooting of Samuel DuBose

duboseJuly 30, 2015 – Segment 2

Dr.Kimberly Moffitt, Associate Professor of American Studies at University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) and co-Editor of Blackberries and Redbones: Critical Articulations of Black Hair/Body Politics in Africana Communities, joins us as guest host.

We start off with a look at University of Cincinnati police officer Ray Tensing’s indictment for the fatal shooting of Samuel DuBose.


July 30: This Day in History

mingusJuly 30, 2015 – Segment 1

Marc talks about what happened on this day in history, including the day the city of Baltimore was founded, the day President Lincoln issued an “eye-for-eye” order to shoot a rebel prisoner for every black prisoner shot, and the day Charles Mingus recorded his solo Piano Album ‘Mingus Plays Piano’.

Read More→


City Paper This Week: Barbecue

cpbarbqJuly 29, 2015 – Segment 5

We close out the show with our regular feature, City Paper This Week with Anna Walsh, City Paper Managing Editor and Eats & Drinks Editor. This week’s topic is: Barbecue!


Youth Poets, Singers and Rappers Share Their Work

theatreJuly 29, 2015 – Segment 4

Steiner Show regular commentator Koli Tengella joins us for a feature on Youth Opportunities (YO), a group of West Baltimore youth who join us to perform material developed in the Positive Social Change Theatre Program.  Students Ashley Ross, Brianna Hall, Shauna Tate, Antonio Stringfellow and Krishawn McCullough will perform positive rap, spoken word poetry and sing, on the theme of the Uprisings and debunking stereotypes about African American youth. Koli is President of Tengella Edutainment, an instructor & creator of the Positive Social Change Theater/Performing Arts Program at Augusta Fells Savage Institute of Visual Arts High School, and was a 2010 Open Society Institute Fellow. His program is in partnership with The Baltimore Office of Promotions and the Arts.

 


Public Health Roundtable: Heroin, Addiction, and Society

heroinJuly 29, 2015 – Segment 3

We hold a public health and society roundtable as we examine how the increase in youth HIV rates and heroin-related deaths are connected to other societal issues. With: Dr. Lorece Edwards, Director of Community Practice and Outreach and Associate Professor in the Department of Behavioral Health Sciences at the Morgan State University School of Community Health and Policy; and Jacqueline Robarge, Founder and Director of Power Inside, a project of Fusion Partnerships.


Reportback from the Movement for Black Lives Convening

clevelandJuly 29, 2015 – Segment 2

We hear a report back from The Movement for Black Lives Convening held in Cleveland over the weekend. Our guests are: Marshall “Eddie” Conway, former Black Panther who was incarcerated for 44 years, co-author of Marshall Law: The Life and Times of a Baltimore Black Panther, and part of The Real News Network‘s Baltimore Bureau; Dominque Stevenson, Program Director for the American Friends Service Committee and co-author with Eddie Conway of Marshall Law: The Life and Times of a Baltimore Black Panther; Fanon Hill, Executive Director & co-founder of The Youth Resiliency Institute; and performance artist Waqia Abdul-Kareem.

 


July 29: This Day in History

Mill_Children_1903July 29, 2015 – Segment 1

On this day in history, radical union leader Mother Jones led a march of mill children to the doorstep of President Theodore Roosevelt’s summer home in Oyster Bay, New York to expose conditions that children as young as 4 or 5 experienced working in sweatshops.

Read More→


Guns in Society: Gun Control, Self Defense, and Civil Rights

gunsJuly 28, 2015 – Segment 4

We host a philosopher’s roundtable on guns in our society, looking at the debate taking place now around gun control, calls for self defense in light of the shooting in Charleston, and the role of guns in the civil rights movement. With: Firmin DeBrabander, Professor of Philosophy at the Maryland Institute College of Art and author of Do Guns Make us Free: Democracy and the Armed Society; Charlie Cobb, author ofThis Nonviolent Stuff’ll Get You Killed: How Guns Made the Civil Rights Movement Possible; and Dante Barry, Executive Director of the Million Hoodies March for Justice.


Marilyn Mosby Reopening Police Involved Killing Cases?

marilynmosbyJuly 28, 2015 – Segment 3

Last week Baltimore City Councilman Warren Branch called for State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby to reopen the cases of three black men who died in the custody of Baltimore Police during the last three years – Tyrone West, Anthony Anderson, and Maurice Johnson. In addition, the NAACP, ACLU, and other groups are calling for police reform in Baltimore. Our panel examines State’s Attorney Mosby’s first months in office and the possible responses from her office regarding these calls for change. With: Tom Maronick, Baltimore Attorney and Host of the Tom Moore show on AM 680 WCBM; and A. Dwight Pettit, Defense Attorney who has represented clients in police misconduct cases.

 


Homelessness and Encampments in Baltimore

homelessnessJuly 28, 2015 – Segment 2

As Baltimore City is seeking to clear the encampment of homeless persons along the Fallsway,  we examine the practice of clearing encampments as well as the role of advocates in holding the city accountable. With: Adam Schneider, Director of Community Relations at Health Care for the Homeless and co-chair of the Maryland Alliance for the Poor.

 


July 28: This Day in History

bachJuly 28, 2015 – Segment 1

On this day in history, Johann Sebastian Bach died and the 14th Amendment of the US Constitution was ratified today.

Transcript of this day in history included below.

Read More→


Report: 1 In 7 Maryland Children Live In Poverty, More Than During Recession

Children in PovertyJuly 27, 2015 – Segment 4

Last week, The Annie E. Casey Foundation released a report indicating that one in seven Maryland children live in poverty, more than at the depth of the Great Recession. Joining us to discuss the report is Nonso Umunna, Research Director for Advocates for Children and Youth.


Talking About Race: Poll Shows Over 60% Of Americans Believe U.S. Race Relations Are Bad

Black Lives MatterJuly 27, 2015 – Segment 3

In light of the CBS News/New York Times poll released last week revealing that over 60% of Americans believe that race relations in the U.S. are bad, we take on this tough topic.

Our panel of guests includes: Baynard Woods, Editor at Large for the Baltimore City Paper; Catalina Byrd, media consultant and political strategist, and co-host of No Hooks for the Hip Hop Chronicles on WEAA 88.9 FM; Jodi Kelber-Kaye, Associate Director of the Honors College at UMBC; and Dr. Desiree H. Melton, Associate Professor of Philosophy in the School of Arts & Sciences at Notre Dame of Maryland University.


Sandra Bland And The #SayHerName Campaign

Sandra Bland, 28, was found dead Monday in a Waller County jail cell in Hempstead, Texas, after authorities said she hanged herself with a plastic trash bag. It is an act those close to her question.July 27, 2015 – Segment 2

We turn to the topic of Black women and the police, including Sandra Bland and the #SayHerName campaign. With: Dani McClain, Fellow at the Nation Institute.


July 27: This Day In History

Osborne Perry AndersonJuly 27, 2015 – Segment 1

Today in history, Red Summer began in Chicago with whites attacking black people and their communities, the man who escaped John Brown’s raid Osborne Perry Anderson was born, and the first permanent telegraph cable was finished from Ireland to Newfoundland.

Transcript of this day in history included below.

Read More→


The Experience Of Black Women In Academia

Dr. Bonnie Thornton-DillJuly 24, 2015 – Segment 5

We close out the show with a rebroadcast of last spring’s discussion on the topic of Black Women in Academia.

Our panel of guests includes: Dr. Bonnie Thornton Dill, Dean of Arts and Humanities at the University of Maryland, College Park; Dr. Pamela Scott Johnson, Interim Dean of College of Liberal Arts at Morgan State University; and Dr. Tara Bynum, Assistant Professor in the Department of English at Towson University.


American Visionary Art Museum: The Visionary Experience From Saint Francis to Finster

Visionary ExperienceJuly 24, 2015 – Segment 4

We continue with more compelling works of art as we take an audio tour of the current exhibition at the American Visionary Art Museum (AVAM): The Visionary Experience: Saint Francis to FinsterOur docent is none other than AVAM Founder and Director Rebecca Hoffberger.


Talking To Baltimore-Based Artist Loring Cornish

Loring CornishJuly 24, 2015 – Segment 3

We talk with Baltimore-based artist Loring Cornish about his inspirational new piece “Change for the Better” which was unveiled over the weekend at Artscape.


Tengella’s Take: Being Rich Can Make You Crazy

Donald TrumpJuly 24, 2015 – Segment 2

It’s our weekly feature, Tengella’s Take with Koli Tengella. Koli is President of Tengella Edutainment, an instructor and creator of the positive social change performing arts program at Augusta Fells Savage Institute of Visual Arts High School, and was a 2010 Open Society Institute Fellow.


July 24: This Day In History

Ladybug MeccaJuly 24, 2015 – Segment 1

Today in history, Ladybug Mecca of Digable Planets was born, Red Summer violence reached Washington DC, and the Scottsboro Boys were convicted of rapes they did not convict.

Transcript of this day in history included below.

Read More→


Sound Bites: Is The Safe And Accurate Food Labeling Act Denying Americans The Right To Know? | YES! Magazine: Meet the Scientist Breeding More Resilient Bees

FILE - In this Jan. 28, 2014, file photo, a hive of honeybees appears on display at the Vermont Beekeeping Supply booth at the annual Vermont Farm Show at the Champlain Valley Expo in Essex Junction, Vt. The federal government hopes to reverse America's declining honeybee and monarch butterfly populations by making more federal land bee-friendly, spending more money on research and considering the use of less pesticides. (AP Photo/Andy Duback, File)July 23, 2015 – Segment 3

It’s our newest episode of Sound Bites, our series on our food and our world. We begin the hour with a debate and analysis of a controversial bill making its way through Congress right now, called The Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act. Anti-GMO (genetically-modified organisms) advocates are calling this the DARK (“Deny Americans the Right to Know”) Act because it would not require genetically-modified foods to be labeled as such. Another critical and far-reaching impact of this bill would be that it would overturn the mandatory labeling bills in places where GMOs are currently being labeled, and make it more difficult for state and local governments to regulate GMO plants.

We hear two different perspectives on The Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act: Will Saletan, who writes about politics, science and technology for Slate and created a piece called “Unhealthy Fixation: The Misleading War on GMOs. The Food is Safe. The Rhetoric is Dangerous;” and Colin O’Neil, who is the Director of Government Affairs for the Center for Food Safety.

Next: Earlier this month we started a partnership with our longtime friends over at Yes! Magazine to produce radio stories inspired by their articles. This week’s story springs from the Yes! Summer 2015 “Make It Right” Issue: “Meet the Scientist Breeding More Resilient Bees (And 4 Other People Working to Save the Pollinators),” which tells the story of how scientists, lawyers, and even artists have set out to save our world’s most important pollinators: the honeybees.

I sat down with one of the people featured in that article, Lori Ann Burd, Environmental Health Program Director and Staff Attorney for the Center for Biological Diversity, as well as local beekeepers Bonnie Raindrop, Legislative Chair of the Central Maryland Beekeepers Association, and master beekeeperSteve McDaniel, who teaches a course on beekeeping at the Irvine Nature Center.


Wrestling With Ta-Nehisi Coates’ New Book ‘Between The World And Me’

Ta-Nehisi CoatesJuly 23, 2015 – Segment 2

Our guest host is Dr. Lester Spence, Center for Emerging Media Scholar-In-Residence, Associate Professor of Political Science and Africana Studies at Johns Hopkins University, and author of the forthcoming Knocking the Hustle: Against the Neoliberal Turn in Black Politics.

In follow-up to Marc’s discussion yesterday with Ta-Nehisi Coates on his new book Between the World and Me, we continue the discussion on this important and compelling book. The panel of guests includes: Dr. Karsonya “Kaye” Wise Whitehead, Assistant Professor of Communication and Affiliate Assistant Professor of African and African American Studies at Loyola University Maryland, the author of several books, including Letters to My Black Sons: Raising Boys in a Post-Racial America and the award-winning Notes From A Colored Girl: The Civil War Pocket Diaries of Emile Frances Davis, and writer of a review of Between the World and Me in the Baltimore Sun; Dr. Kimberly Moffitt, Associate Professor of American Studies at University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) and co-editor of Blackberries and Redbones: Critical Articulations of Black Hair/Body Politics in Africana Communities; and D. Watkins, Salon.com writer and author of the forthcoming The Beast Side: Living and Dying While Black in America.


July 23: This Day In History

The Detroit RiotsJuly 23, 2015  – Segment 1

Today in history, Ethiopian Emperor Haile Selassie was born, the Eastern Cherokee Council held a meeting in discuss President Jackson’s proposal to turn their lands into what is now called Oklahoma, and one of the deadliest riots in US history broke out on 12th Street in Detroit.

Read More→


City Paper This Week: The Queer Issue

City Paper Queer IssueJuly 22, 2015 – Segment 5

Anthony McCarthy, host of The Anthony McCarthy Show on WEAA 88.9FM, sits in as guest host.
We close out the show with our weekly look at the current issue of the City Paper with Anna Walsh, Managing Editor and Eats and Drinks Editor, for theBaltimore City Paper. This week, it is City Paper‘s Queer Issue.

#BaltimoreTRANSuprising Rally & March To Uplift Voices Of Transgender Baltimoreans

Baltimore Trans UprisingJuly 22, 2015 – Segment 4

Anthony McCarthy, host of The Anthony McCarthy Show on WEAA 88.9FM, sits in as guest host. We talk about the #BaltimoreTRANSuprising rally and march happening this Friday at 5:00pm at Charles and North. The rally and march are meant to lift up voices of transgender people in Baltimore.

We’re joined by Bryanna Jenkins, lead organizer for #BaltimoreTRANSUprising and founding member of the Baltimore Transgender Alliance; Monica Stevens Yorkman, community activist from Sistas of the T and part of the Baltimore Trans Alliance; and Vann Michael, Black Transmen Inc. Maryland/DC Chapter representative, and local advocate who pens the “Real Trans Talk” column for Baltimore OUTloud. 


State Politics Roundtable: Has Governor Hogan Forgotten About Baltimore City?

BALTIMORE, MD - APRIL 28:  Maryland Governor Larry Hogan greets Baltimore police dressed in riot gear the morning after citywide riots following the funeral of Freddie Gray, on April 28, 2015 in Baltimore, Maryland. Gray, 25, was arrested for possessing a switch blade knife April 12 outside the Gilmor Houses housing project on Baltimore's west side. According to his attorney, Gray died a week later in the hospital from a severe spinal cord injury he received while in police custody. (Photo by Mark Makela/Getty Images)July 22, 2015 – Segment 3

Anthony McCarthy, host of The Anthony McCarthy Show on WEAA 88.9FM, sits in as guest host. We have a state politics roundtable and discuss Governor Hogan’s policies.

Joining us are: Charles Robinson, Political and Business Correspondent For Maryland Public Television; Dr. Roni Ellington, Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at Morgan State University; and Eugene Craig III, grassroots activist, 3rd Vice-Chair of the Maryland Republican State Party.


Ta-Nehisi Coates: Between the World and Me

coatesJuly 22, 2015 – Segment 2

TaNehisi Coates joins us to discuss his new book, Between the World and Me. Coates is national correspondent at The Atlantic, where he writes about culture, politics, and social issues.

 


July 22: This Day In History

James Earl JonesJuly 22, 2015 – Segment 1

Today in history, actor James Earl Jones received the National Medal of Arts, Palestinian cartoonist Naji Salim al-Ali was shot and killed in London, and the great George Clinton was born.

Read More→


Anti-Black Racism, Trauma and Mental Health

fulliloveJuly 21, 2015 – Segment 4

We turn to the topic of the psychological impact of anti-Black racism, trauma and more by talking about the Black Mental Health Alliance. With: Dr. Mindy Fullilove, Professor of Clinical Psychiatry and Public Health at Columbia University; Michael Scott, Chief Equity Officer, President and Co-Founder of Equity Matters; Jan Desper, Executive Director of the Black Mental Health Alliance; and Maurissa Stone Bass, Director of The Living Well.

 

The Black Mental Health Alliance is launching its new innovative model of community engagement and transformative planning designed to infuse mental health strategies and solutions into the current and longstanding challenges facing Baltimore City. From July 2015 to June 2016, BMHA will convene national thought leaders, researchers and scholars who will share their knowledge and recommendations around the issues of education, housing, criminal justice, and more. The inaugural event of this series will feature Dr. Mindy Thompson Fullilove on Thursday, July 23, 2015. Dr. Fullilove helps cities neutralize the effects of policies detrimental to communities such as mass incarceration, planned shrinkage, disinvestment, and deindustrialization by undertaking deliberate actions to improve quality of life.


×

Listen to The Marc Steiner Show • M-F 10am-Noon LISTEN LIVE