The Marc Steiner Show

Archive for Sustainability

Sound Bites: “If There Are No New Farmers, Who Will Grow Our Food?”

Kim EckartFebruary 4, 2016 – Segment 2

Today on Sound Bites, we meet with Kim Eckarta Seattle-based writer and associate editor at Yes! magazine.  She wrote an article called, “If There Are No New Farmers, Who Will Grow Our Food?” for How to Create a Culture of Good Health, the Winter 2016 issue of YES! Magazine.

We are then joined by young farmers Walker Marsh, Founder & Owner of The Flower Factory; Isabel Antreasian, Project Manager for Whitelock Community Farm; Sache Jones, Food Justice Consultant for Park Heights Community Health Alliance and Manager of the AFYA Community Teaching Garden in Park Heights; and Charlotte Keniston, current Open Society Institute fellow, working with Paul’s Place on community-led interventions to address food accessibility in the Pigtown neighborhood of Baltimore.


Sound Bites: Environment & Upcoming Legislative Session | Remembering Life & Work of Cultural Anthropologist Sidney Mintz

5640847994_02bfcd008e_nJanuary 7, 2016 – Segment 2

Today during the newest edition of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world, we begin with a look at environmental legislation that will be addressed in the 2016 Maryland General Assembly, in our Countdown to the Annapolis Summit. Joining us will be  Dru Schmidt-Perkins, President of 1000 Friends of Maryland; and Mitch Jones, Senior Policy Advocate at Food and Water Watch.
We close out Sound Bites with a special tribute to the life and work of renowned cultural anthropologist Dr. Sidney Mintz, known as the Father of Food Anthropology. Mr. Mintz died on December 27, 2015 at the age of 93. Celebrating his life and work is Sarah Hill, Associate Professor of Environmental and Sustainability Studies at Western Michigan University and author of the Boston Review article “The Sweet Life of Sidney Mintz;” Kevin A. Yelvington, Professor of Anthropology at the University of South Florida; Richard Wilk, Distinguished Professor of Anthropology at Indiana University and Jane Guyer, George Armstrong Kelly Professor of Anthropology at Johns Hopkins University.

 


Sound Bites: A Game of Chicken? Pt. 2 | Future Harvest’s Young Farmer Training Program

Photo Credit: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/41588491@N00/3434111411/">joshunter</a> via <a href="http://compfight.com">Compfight</a> <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/">cc</a>October 1, 2015 – Segment 2

We begin with a recent town hall on the Eastern Shore of Maryland where we discuss poultry industry expansion and hear how concerned citizens are beginning to organize to keep their rural communities and local waterways healthy.  Our panelists include Dr. Jillian Fry from the Johns Hopkins University Center for a Livable Future; Dr. Kirkland Hall, a long-time member of Somerset County’s NAACP branch and the UMES chapter adviser; Maria Payan, consultant with Socially Responsible Agriculture Project and with the Assateague Coastal Trust; and Backbone Corridor Neighbors Association spokesperson, Lisa Inzerillo.

We then look into an important educational opportunity: the Future Harvest-CASA Young Farmer Training Program with Sarah Sohn, Future Harvest-CASA’s Program Manager; Ausar-Mesh Amen, current trainee and manager of the Fannie Lou Hamer & Sundiata Acoli Community Farm; and Laura Beth Resnick, program graduate, soon-to-be trainer in the program, and owner/farmer at Butterbee Farm.


Sound Bites: Monsanto In The Supreme Court; Plastic In Our Food; Visions For Transforming The Food System

MONSANTO-articleLarge

March 6, 2013 – Hour 2

It’s a new episode of Sound Bites. We’ll look at the Bowman vs. Monsanto case, recently heard in the Supreme Court, which addresses the question of who owns the rights to Monsanto’s genetically engineered RoundUp Ready seeds. We’re joined by Andrew Pollack, New York Times science and biotechnology reporter; Bill Freese, Science Policy Analyst for the Center for Food Safety; and Gary Baise, legal counsel for the American Soybean Association.

We will also hear from Mother Jones food and agriculture blogger Tom Philpott, who brings us a story about the plastic chemicals that are in our food; and Wenonah Hauter, author of Foodopoly and Executive Director of Food and Water Watch, about her visions for transforming the food system.


Sound Bites: Food Industry Consolidation, Transition to Organic Grain, and Healthy Soul Food

Klaas and Mary-Howell Martens, Lakeview Organic Grains - Photo by Valery Rizzo

February 28, 2013 – Hour 1

On our newest episode of Sound Bites, we continue our conversation with Wenonah Hauter, Executive Director of Food and Water Watch and author of Foodopoly: The Battle Over the Future of Food and Farming in America. Wenonah shares her perspective on how consolidation of food and agricultural companies has affected both conventional and organic farming.

Next we talk with Mary-Howell Martens, who runs one of the oldest and largest organic grain farms in New York with her husband Klaas – Lakeview Organic Grain – for a conversation on how farmers transition from conventional to organic farming. Then, Carissa Lovelace and Sophia Maravell update us on the latest news from Brickyard Educational Farm.

We close out the first hour with a seasonal recipe by Mookie Hicks, the chef/owner of Nouvo Soul Catering, who also shares his insight on how to make healthier soul food.


May 4, 2010 – Segment 2

Bob Dixson, Mayor of Greensburg, Kansas, joins us.  Greensburg was destroyed by a tornado on May 4, 2007, three years ago today.  After the tornado, the City Council passed a resolution stating that all city buildings would be built to platinum LEED standards, making it the first city in the nation to do so.

At noon this Saturday, May 8, Bob Dixson will give the keynote address at the Solar and Wind Expo, which takes place at the Timonium Fairgrounds this Friday through Sunday.  For more info, go to www.thesolarwindexpo.com

 


May 3, 2010 – Segment 2

In the second segment of the show, we take a broad look at what the Gulf Coast oil spill means for United States energy policy.  Can our economy afford to end offshore drilling?  Can our environment afford not to end it?
We’re joined by:
Jon Hiskes, staff writer at grist.org
Mike Olsen, counsel in Bracewell and Giuliani’s Environmental Strategies Group in Washington, DC.  He worked for five years in the Department of the Interior under George W. Bush.
Jackie Savitz, Senior Campaign Director for the Pollution Campaigns at Oceana
Mike Tidwell, Executive Director of the Chesapeake Climate Action Network


May 3, 2010 – Segment 1

First, another trip to the University of Maryland Hospital to visit the Center for Advanced Fetal Care.

Then, Anthony McCarthy and Marc co-host a special look at the oil spill in the Gulf Coast.  We begin the show with a discussion about what happened, how the cleanup is going, and what is likely to happen over the next few weeks. 
We’re joined by:
Steven Peyronnin, Executive Director of the Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana 
Richard Charter, Government Relations Consultant for the Defenders of Wildlife Action Fund

To read a list of the 11 workers who lost their lives in the explosion of the oil rig, click here.  


April 22, 2010 – Hour 1

This hour we feature two perspectives on transitioning to cleaner sources of energy.

First, we speak with Grist staff writer Jonathan Hiskes about his trip to Wales to explore the transition Wales has been making since its coal-based economy bottomed out in the mid ’80’s.  Check out his article Save the Wales: ‘Britain’s Appalachia’ Engineers a Brighter Post-Coal Future.

Activist Maria Gunnoe, winner of the 2009 Goldman Prize for her work fighting to protect her homeland in West Virginia from the devastation of mountaintop removal coal mining, joins us for the second part of the hour.

Click here to find out where your energy comes from and what your connection to mountaintop removal is.


March 29, 2010 – Hour 2

During the second hour Marc and co-host Anthony McCarthy are joined by Robert Percival, director of the environmental law program at the University of Maryland School of Law, Senator Lisa Gladden, democratic state senator from Maryland’s 41st district, Senator James(Jim) Brochin, democratic state senator from Maryland’s 42nd district, and Delegate Richard Sossi, Republican Delegate representing the 36th district on the Eastern Shore, deputy minority whip and a member of Environmental matters committee, to talk about a suit by the University of Maryland’s environmental law clinic that accuses poultry giant Perdue Farms of water pollution.  The lawsuit has led to a debate in Annapolis over cutting funding to the law clinic, raising the issues of academic freedom and corporate influence on politicians.


March 25, 2010 – Segment 2

Today we take a look at one of the collaborative visions that came out of this year’s Urbanite Project. Divining Baltimore: A Visioning Exercise looks at the streams hidden beneath Baltimore’s streets, and wonders how we could create a greener, more livable city by unearthing them.  Eliza Steinmeier, Executive Director and Waterkeeper for Baltimore Harbor Waterkeeper, Gabriel Kroiz, an architect, builder, educator, and BSAED Program Director and Assistant Professor at Morgan State University’s School of Architecture and Planning, and Christopher Streb, ecological engineer at Biohabitats join us to discuss their project.

View the map of the streams hidden beneath our city streets
.


March 9, 2010 – Hour 2

David Kirby joins us to discuss his new book Animal Factory: The Looming Threat of Industrial Pig, Dairy and Poultry Farms on Humans and the Environment.


September 23, 2009 – Hour 2

Author Peter Brown joined us for the second segment of the show. He is a professor at McGill University’s School of Environment and the co-author with Geoffrey Garver of Right Relationship: Building a Whole Earth Economy. The book offers a comprehensive new model for world economic systems that seeks to serve all people and protects the natural world.

Then in the final part of the show, Marc sat down with leaders from some of Baltimore’s public safety unions to discuss the upcoming city budget cuts and employee furloughs.

Marc was joined by:

Robert Cherry, President of the Baltimore City Fraternal Order of Police, Lodge 3

Stephen Fugate, President of Baltimore Fire Officers Local 964

Henry Burris, President of the Vulcan Blazers


August 11, 2009 – Hour 2

Will Allen is an urban farmer who has garnered national recognition for the work he has done in Milwaukee, WI where his operation Growing Power produces about $500,000 of affordable produce, meat, and fish. Will won a MacArthur Fellowship in 2008 for his work in urban farming. He joins Marc to share his thoughts on the future of urban agriculture and how other cities could begin to produce food.


August 4, 2009 – Hour 1

Marc and guests discuss a new farming program that the Baltimore School system is running here in Baltimore. Great food and opportunities are being provided to students for locally grown, organic fruits and vegetables.

Today’s guests were:


July 30, 2009 – Hour 1

In the second hour of today’s show, Marc spoke with guests about the future of food production and the ability to feed the world organically.

The panel included:

This show is a rebroadcast. Click here to listen to the podcast on the original show page.


July 29, 2009 – Hour 2

It’s time for America to rethink energy. How much energy we use, how we use it, and, most importantly, where it comes from.

Today, we talk about one of the most polarizing options on the table: nuclear power. Once protested as too dangerous to even contemplate, some environmental activists are considering it as one of our most viable options for sustainable energy–a low carbon emission source that will decrease our dependence on foreign oil.

What’s the big picture? Is nuclear energy more or less hazardous than our established system? Will uranium, most of which needs to be imported to the US, become our new foreign oil? What about radioactive waste: are we glossing over the dangers or exaggerating them in our search for a lasting solution to powering America?

Today’s panel included:

This show is a rebroadcast. Click here to listen to the podcast on the original show page.


July 29, 2009 – Hour 1

On today’s show, Marc spoke with several environmental leaders about how the racial make-up of Baltimore City may change or effect the discussion of environmental justice.

Today’s studio panel included:

This show is a rebroadcast. Click here to listen to the podcast on the original show page.


July 28, 2009 – Hour 1

The United States has one of the most progressive environmental justice systems in the world. Theoretically, Americans have access to more information, more options, and more community support in trying to lessen their environmental impact.

Environmentalism is still viewed by many as a luxury for the privileged, though more and more people are recognizing that we’re all subject to the dangers of environmental destruction, especially working class families already limited by their income.

The definition of "American Environmentalism" needs to be retooled in accordance with the changing reality of the "American Environmentalist": made more inclusive and accessible to everyone in a society that needs it more than ever.

Today’s panel included:

  • Dr. Mary Washington, assistant director of the Urban Resources Initiative at Parks and People and commissioner on the Baltimore Sustainability Program
  • Irv Sheffy, Environmental Justice Organizer for the Sierra Club in Southeast DC, Anacostia Area
  • Julian Agyeman, Professor and Chair of the Department of Urban and Environmental Planning at Tufts University, co-founder of the Black Environmental Network, the first environmental justice based organization of it’s kind in Britain, started in 1988, and author of many books, including Sustainable Communities and the Challenge of Environmental Justice and the upcoming Environmental Injustice Across Borders: Local Perspectives on Global Inequities.

This show is a rebroadcast. Click here to listen to the podcast on the original show page.


July 27, 2009 – Hour 2

Public awareness on the need for becoming more energy efficient and lessening our environmental impact is at an all time high. However, in an economic crisis where many families are struggling to keep their homes and jobs, "going green" just can’t be a top priority–or can it?

Today, Marc and his guests discuss urban sustainability: what our options are, how we need to change our thinking, and how we can help sustainable living shift from theory to practice for everyone.

In the studio, we had Shari T. Wilson, Secretary of the Maryland Department of the Environment. By phone, Jim Motavalli, editor turned senior writer of E: The Environmental Magazine, host of a biweekly music and public affairs show on Listener Supported WPKN-FM, blogger for the New York Times, Mother Nature Network, and author of Forward Drive: The Race to Build Clean Cars for the Future and Feeling the Heat: Dispatches from the Frontlines of Climate Change

This show is a rebroadcast. Click here to listen to the podcast on the original show page.


Eat Your Lawn

Ever dreamed of tearing up your lawn and growing some plants you can eat?  We’re joined by Scott Carlson, who did just that outside of his Rodgers Forge rowhouse, and Jon Traunfeld, the director of the Home and Garden Information Center at University of Maryland.  While you’re listening to our podcast, take a look at Scott’s article on this topic in Urbanite Magazine’s July issue.


July 16, 2009 – Hour 1

As part of the stimulus package, the federal government has invested $3.4 billion in carbon capture and sequestration projects. Advocates say this investment could demonstrate and expand the usefulness of "clean coal" technologies and make them an important part of managing climate change. Meanwhile, critics warn us that carbon capture and storage is too expensive and wasteful to even begin to counterbalance its unquantifiable health and environmental risks.

Coal isn’t going away any time soon, so what are our options?

This hour’s panel included:

This show is a rebroadcast. Click here to listen to the podcast on the original show page.


July 2, 2009 – Hour 1

Michael Pollan is the author of best-selling books like The Omnivore’s Dilemma and In Defense of Food
He is to food what Al Gore is to climate change; he has done more than
anyone else to change the converstion about the consequences of the
modern western diet.  He joined Marc for a conversation about food,
farm policy, the environment, politics, and more.
 
Note: This show is a rebroadcast.  To go to the originial show page and listen to the podcast of the complete show, click here.


June 23, 2009 – Hour 1

In our first hour, we talked first with Van Jones, founder of Green for All,  recently appointed Special Advisor for Green Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation at the White House Council on Environmental Quality. Marc and Jones talk about green jobs and recent moves by the federal government to implement more environmentally sustainable practices.

We followed that with an update on Somerset County, where an NAACP/ACLU report recently alledged that there is overwhelming inequality in the county government and workforce. The article referenced in the conversation can be found here: County in Maryland Suffering Rampant Racism, says NAACP/ACLU Report 

The panel for this segment included:


June 16, 2009 – Hour 1

Having trouble with your tomato plants or experiencing a bug infestation in your rose garden?  Noticed something strange about your favorite tree or concerned about your perennials?  Marc is joined this hour by gardeners who can take and answer your questions about how to make your garden grow.  Today’s panel includes:

 


June 9, 2009 – Hour 2

At the top of the hour, Marc interviews William David Cohan, author of House of Cards: A Tale of Huberous and Wretched Excess on Wall Street about the op-ed he co-authored with Sandy Lewis on Sunday, "The Economy is Still on the Brink." Cohan worked on Wall Street for seventeen years and has some profound insights into the mechanics of Wall Street and what really needs to happen for lasting reform.

We close out the show with an interview with Hugh Pocock, who is examining the role sustainability issues take in art. Pocock currently has a show at the Contemporary Museum called "My Food My Poop." He keeps a blog on the course he teaches at MICA, called Climate Change and Sustainability for Artists and Designers, and is running an Urban Farming course over the summer.

 


June 2, 2009 – Hour 2

Today on the second hour of the Marc Steiner show, we took a close look at one of the biggest issues in the environmental movement today – fuel efficient personal vehicles.  Efficiency has become a popular buzzword in the car industry over the past several years, with excitement building over the possibility of an automobile that uses little fuel and emits minimal pollution.   But our first guest today claims that that’s a pipe dream.  Alex Dubro is the author of “The Myth of the Fuel Efficient Car” in the current issue of The Progressive Magazine, and he argues that that it’s impossible to design a car that will both allow us to maintain our current lifestyle and protect the atmosphere. 

Then we talked with Ray Carrier, proprietor of Green Rider, an electric scooter shop right here in Baltimore, about the ways that electric scooters could make city living more sustainable.



May 26, 2009 – Hour 1

Michael Pollan is the author of best-selling books like The Omnivore’s Dilemma and In Defense of Food
He is to food what Al Gore is to climate change-he has done more than
anyone else to change the converstion about the consequences of the
modern western diet.  He joined Marc for a conversation about food,
farm policy, the environment, politics, and more.


May 19, 2009 – Hour 1

For the first hour of today’s show, Marc was joined in-studio by Stephen Thomas, to discuss the economic viability of nuclear energy in America.  Stephen Thomas is a professor of Energy Studies at the University of Greenwich (London), and has been a researcher in energy policy for more than 25 years.


May 12, 2009 – Hour 1

The first hour of today’s show was divided into two segments.

For the first segment, Marc spoke with Daniel Becker of the Safe Climate Campaign, to discuss the three things President Obama could do without Congress to cut emissions now.

For the second segment, Marc was joined by Councilman Bill Henry to discuss how reallocation of resources for youth development programs is a far better solution than increasing the number of police officers.


May 11, 2009 – Hour 1

Today’s show began with another look at the future of journalism. Senator Ben Cardin discussed his bill that would allow newspapers to operate as nonprofits. Then Walter Isaacson, the former Chairman and CEO of CNN and former managing editor of Time, shared his take on the future of news.

To finish the hour, Maria Gunnoe spoke about her work fighting to stop the practice of mountaintop removal coal mining. She was recently awarded the Goldman Environmental Prize for her work to save her Appalachian community. Floods in West Virginia and Kentucky this weekend have highlighted the terrible consequences of mountaintop removal coal mining.

 

Senator Ben Cardin was elected to represent Maryland in the U.S. Senate in 2006. He previously served 19 years in the House. He serves on the Foreign Relations Committee, Judiciary Committee, Environment and Public Works Committee, Budget Committee and Small Business Committee.

Walter Isaacson is the President and CEO of the Aspen Institute and formerly serves as the Chairman and CEO of CNN and the Managing Editor of TIME.

Maria Gunnoe is a native of West Virginia who advocates for the end of mountaintop removal coal mining.  


May 5, 2009 – Hour 1

The Baltimore area saw two major water main breaks last week. These incidents are just the tip of the iceberg in terms of the crisis in American infrastructure. From structurally unsound bridges to aging sewer systems that dump untreated waste into waterways, we’ve got a problem that the American Society of Civil Engineers says it will take $2.2 trillion dollars to fix.

What investments need to be made? What will happen if we don’t take action to address this problem now?

Today’s panel included:

 


April 28, 2009 – Hour 2

Marc and his guests discuss whether the dream of a sustainable future will require more limits on population growth. What would a population controlled future look like? Is it possible to enforce limits on population growth in a fair and equitable way? What other matters–poverty, education, innovation in governance–will play a role in the future well-being of our society?

This segment’s panel included:

Stan Becker, professor at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Erle Ellis, Environmental Scientist, Associate Professior in the Department of Geography and Environmental Systems at UMBC

 



April 28, 2009 – Hour 1

Our city’s lack of a reliable and cohesive public transit system is not just an inconvenience for our citizens, but in the current economical crunch, an ever-growing liability. In our first hour, we debate Baltimore’s proposed Red Line. How can we build it? Where do we put it? Can Baltimore City afford to put a transit system underground, and if we can’t, should we wait until funding is available? How will it affect our community?

The panel for this segment included:


April 21, 2009 – Hour 1

In our first hour, we take our weekly look at sustainability issues: in our city, our country, and the rest of the world. Today, we take our first deep look at the economy and its role in sustainability.

In President Obama’s stimulus package, 62 billion dollars were allocated to "green" initiatives, covering everything from energy efficient retrofits for low income homes to new job training.

Obviously, this means big changes for our economy. What kind of changes? How will those changes affect us?

Today’s panel included:



April 14, 2009 – Hour 1

As part of the stimulus package, the federal government has invested $3.4 billion in carbon capture and sequestration projects. Advocates say this investment could demonstrate and expand the usefulness of "clean coal" technologies and make them an important part of managing climate change. Meanwhile, critics warn us that carbon capture and storage is too expensive and wasteful to even begin to counterbalance its unquantifiable health and environmental risks.

Coal isn’t going away any time soon, so what are our options?

This hour’s panel included:


April 7, 2009 – Hour 2

In the second hour of today’s show, Marc spoke with guests about the future of food production and the ability to feed the world organically.

The panel included:


March 31, 2009

It’s time for America to rethink energy. How much energy we use, how we use it, and, most importantly, where it comes from.

Today, we talk about one of the most polarizing options on the table: nuclear power. Once protested as too dangerous to even contemplate, some environmental activists are considering it as one of our most viable options for sustainable energy–a low carbon emission source that will decrease our dependence on foreign oil.

What’s the big picture? Is nuclear energy more or less hazardous than our established system? Will uranium, most of which needs to be imported to the US, become our new foreign oil? What about radioactive waste: are we glossing over the dangers or exaggerating them in our search for a lasting solution to powering America?

Today’s panel included:


March 24, 2009

On today’s show, Marc spoke with several environmental leaders about how the racial make-up of Baltimore City may change or effect the discussion of environmental justice.

Today’s studio panel included:


March 17, 2009

The United States has one of the most progressive environmental justice systems in the world. Theoretically, Americans have access to more information, more options, and more community support in trying to lessen their environmental impact.

Environmentalism is still viewed by many as a luxury for the privileged, though more and more people are recognizing that we’re all subject to the dangers of environmental destruction, especially working class families already limited by their income.

The definition of "American Environmentalism" needs to be retooled in accordance with the changing reality of the "American Environmentalist": made more inclusive and accessible to everyone in a society that needs it more than ever.

Today’s panel included:

  • Dr. Mary Washington, assistant director of the Urban Resources Initiative at Parks and People and commissioner on the Baltimore Sustainability Program
  • Irv Sheffy, Environmental Justice Organizer for the Sierra Club in Southeast DC, Anacostia Area
  • Julian Agyeman, Professor and Chair of the Department of Urban and Environmental Planning at Tufts University, co-founder of the Black Environmental Network, the first environmental justice based organization of it’s kind in Britain, started in 1988, and author of many books, including Sustainable Communities and the Challenge of Environmental Justice and the upcoming Environmental Injustice Across Borders: Local Perspectives on Global Inequities.

March 10, 2009

Public awareness on the need for becoming more energy efficient and lessening our environmental impact is at an all time high. However, in an economic crisis where many families are struggling to keep their homes and jobs, "going green" just can’t be a top priority–or can it?

Today, Marc and his guests discuss urban sustainability: what our options are, how we need to change our thinking, and how we can help sustainable living shift from theory to practice for everyone.

In the studio, we had Shari T. Wilson, Secretary of the Maryland Department of the Environment. By phone, Jim Motavalli, editor turned senior writer of E: The Environmental Magazine, host of a biweekly music and public affairs show on Listener Supported WPKN-FM, blogger for the New York Times, Mother Nature Network, and author of Forward Drive: The Race to Build Clean Cars for the Future and Feeling the Heat: Dispatches from the Frontlines of Climate Change