The Marc Steiner Show

Science

National News Roundtable: Putin and Trump

Trump G20 (Credit (AP Photo/Evan Vucci))July 10, 2017 – Segment 1

We were joined by  guest host Dr. Kimberly Moffitt, Associate Professor of American Studies at University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) and co-editor of Blackberries and Redbones: Critical Articulations of Black Hair/Body Politics in Africana Communities.

She hosted a National News Roundtable focusing on the latest headlines from around the country. Our panel of guests included: Dr. Anne McCarthy, Dean of the Business School at Hamline University in Minneapolis and former Republican candidate for Comptroller of Maryland; Bill Fletcher Jr., Senior Scholar with the Institute for Policy Studies, editorial board member of BlackCommentator.com, co-author of The Indispensable Ally: Black Workers and the Formation of the Congress of Industrial Organizations, 1934-1941 and author of They’re Bankrupting Us! And 20 Other Myths about Unions; and ER Shipp, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and Journalist-in-Residence and Associate Professor of Journalism at Morgan State University.

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Space Chronicles: Conversations with Astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson

Neil DeGrasse Tyson (Credit: http://nepascene.comJanuary 29, 2017 – Segment 3

We hosted my 2012 interview with astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, about his fascinating book Space Chronicles: Facing the Ultimate Frontier.Dr. Tyson is Frederick P. Rose Director of the Hayden Planetarium and Research Associate in the Department of Astrophysics at the American Museum of Natural History.

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Janet Sarbanes: The Protester has Been Released

The Protestor Has Been Released (Credit: Author's Site)June 27, 2017 – Segment 1

We hosted a conversation with author Janet Sarbanes on her new book of short stories The Protester has Been Released. Populated by wise animals and hapless humans, The Protester Has Been Released evokes an end-of-the-world feeling that is equal parts dread and hilarity. Sarbanes is also the author of another collection of short stories, Army of One.


National Roundtable: Senate Health Care Bill & Policy Brutality

Senate Health Bill (Credit: Washington Examiner)June 26, 2017 – Segment 1

We hosted a National News Roundtable, topics to include the Senate’s Health Care Bill. With: farmer, educator, and food justice advocate Denzel Mitchell; Republican grassroots activist Eugene Craig III; and ER Shipp, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and Journalist-in-Residence and Associate Professor of Journalism at Morgan State University.

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Talking About Race: Harm Reduction In Communities of Color

Needle Exchange (credit: ETV News)June 7, 2017 – Segment 1

We hosted a preview of an important community event taking place this Thursday evening at 6:30 at University of Baltimore Law School’s Moot Court Room, part of Open Society Institute-Baltimore’s Talking About Race Series: Harm Reduction and Communities of Color.

I spoke with: Kassandra Frederique, New York State Director at the Drug Policy Alliance (DPA) and co-author of Blueprint for a Public Health and Safety Approach to Drug PolicySamuel Roberts, Associate Professor of History at Columbia University and Associate Professor of Sociomedical Sciences at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health; and Scott Nolen, Director of the Drug Addiction Treatment Program at OSI-Baltimore.

Registration and more information on this free event can be by clicking here.

4chan: The Skeleton Key to the Rise of Trump

4chan trump (Credit: Huffington Post)

June 2, 2017 – Segment 3

We hosted a re-broadcast of a show from earlier this year when I talked with Dale Beran, Professor in the SWAN (Screen Writing and Animation) Department at Morgan State University, about the imageboard website 4chan, based on his article, “4chan: The Skeleton Key to the Rise of Trump.”


Mario Livio: Colossal Mistakes That Changed Our Understanding the Universe

May 1, 2017 – Segment 5

We hosted an archive segment of Cosmic topics, when astrophysicist Mario Livio talks about his new book Brilliant Blunders: From Darwin to Einstein – Colossal Mistakes by Great Scientists That Changed Our Understanding of Life and the Universe.


Dr. Daniel J. Siegel: On The Mind and Being Human

The Mind (Credit: Linked book site)May 9, 2017 – Segment 2

I had a fascinating interview with Daniel J. Siegel, MD, about his book Mind: A Journey to the Heart of Being Human. Siegel is a clinical professor of psychiatry at the UCLA School of Medicine, founding co-director of UCLA’s Mindful Awareness Research Center, founding co-investigator of the UCLA Center for Culture, Brain, and Development, and executive director at the Mindsight Institute.


National News Roundtable: The AHCA and The French Election

Macron (Credit: Fox News)May 8, 2017 – Segment 1

We hosted a National News Roundtable, where we discussed the passage of the American Health Care Act by the U.S. House of Representatives, the French Election results, and much more.

With: Dr. Jack Fruchtman, Jr., Professor of Political Science, Director of the Program in Law and American Civilization, and Director of University Prelaw Advising at Towson University; Sarah Posner, Investigative Fund reporter and winner of a Sidney Award from the Sidney Hillman Foundation; and Dr. Anne McCarthy, Dean of the Business School at Hamline University in Minneapolis and former Republican candidate for Comptroller of Maryland.


Temperature Rising: Climate March Awareness

New Economy Week People's Climate AgendaApril 25, 2017 – Segment 3

We hosted a preview of a special event taking place Wednesday night at the Motor House: Temperature Rising, a Climate March Awareness Showcase! We heard from artists commissioned by MICA to produce works that would engage participation in the upcoming People’s Climate March, with support from the Town Creek Foundation.

With: Meagan Buster aka Ducky Dynamotouring DJ, curator and creative consultant, former Maryland Team Leader and Forecaster for Foot’s Forecast, and “Social media meteorologist;” teacher, artist, and cultural organizer Valeska Populoh, who has been collaborating with several other artists to support a series of art builds at Black Cherry Puppet Theater in the weeks leading up to the march; Akea Brown; and Torianne Montes- Schiff.


Soundbites: The People’s Climate March

Climate March (Credit: 350 Brooklyn)April 20, 2017 – Segment 2

We hosted the newest episode of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world. We listened in to a panel that took place Wednesday, April 19, at 2640 Space in Baltimore, “Fired Up & Ready To Go,” leading up to the People’s Climate March on April 29th in Washington, D.C. I talked with a panel of environmental activists including:
  • Maryland Delegate Robbyn Lewis (46th District), a public health professional, sustainability advocate and community leader
  • Tom Horton, filmmaker, environmental journalist, and admiral of the Chesapeake
  • Destiny Watford, recipient of the Goldman Prize which is one of the most prestigious awards for environmental justice, who also works with Free Your Voice and United Workers
  • Eric Schaeffer, Executive Director for the Environmental Integrity Project
  • Tamara Toles O’Laughlin, Executive Director of the Maryland Environmental Health Network

National News Roundtable: North Korea, Syria, and the Trump Administration

North Korea (Credit: NBC News)April 17, 2017 – Segment 2

We hosted a National News Roundtable where we discussed the issues surrounding Syria and North Korea, as well as numerous other issues.

With: Writer and on-air analyst Imara Jones, Nation Institute fellow and contributor to The Nation and Rolling Stone Josua Holland, and Former Executive Director of The Maryland Democratic Party Quincey Gamble.


Tengella’s Take: State Execution In Arkansas

tengellaApril 14, 2017 – Segment 1

We hosted the newest edition of our weekly segment, Tengella’s Take with Center for Emerging Media Satirical Commentator Koli Tengella. Tengella is President of Tengella Edutainment, an instructor and creator of the Positive Social Change Performing Arts Program at Augusta Fells Savage Institute of Visual Arts High School, and he was a 2010 Open Society Institute Fellow.


Soundbites: The Peoples Climate March & Renewable Energy In Maryland

climateApril 13, 2017 – Segment 2

We hosted the newest edition of our series on our food and our world, Sound Bites. We continued our countdown to the Peoples Climate March, taking place in DC on April 29. We talked about what renewable energy means for the country under Trump as well as for Maryland, specifically. Can Maryland become a hub for renewable energy and can the nation continue to progress towards renewable energy under Donald Trump?

We talked with: Daphne Wysham, Director of the Climate and Energy Program at the Center for Sustainable Economy; and Janet Redman, US Policy Director with Oil Change International and Associate Fellow with the Climate Policy Program at the Institute for Policy Studies in Washington, DC.
We also talked with Arjun Makhijani, President of the Institute for Energy and Environmental Research. Most recently, Dr, Makhijani wrote Carbon-Free and Nuclear-Free: A Roadmap for U.S. Energy Policy, the first analysis of a transition to a U.S. economy based completely on renewable energy without any use of fossil fuels or nuclear power.

Dr. Charles Limb and Dr. Mariale Hardiman: Neuro-Education and Arts In Education

April 12, 2017 – Segment 1

We hosted an archive from 2014 where I spoke with Dr. Charles Limb and Dr. Mariale Hardiman who are pioneers in the field of neuro-education. In lay terms, that means applying what we know about the brain to help teachers be more effective.  One important area of their research is arts integration – using the arts to teach traditional academic disciplines. We spoke about whether putting more arts in the classroom helps kids learn.


Sound Bites: Climate Change and The Future

climate changeApril 6, 2017 – Segment 3

We hosted the latest edition of Sound Bites, our series on our food and our world. We examined the historical context of the climate change debate. The discussion springs from a 2014 article by Charles Mann in the Atlantic Monthly: “How to Talk about Climate Change so People Will Listen.”

Our guests are: Dr. Paul Sabin, associate professor in the Department of History at Yale University, Director of Undergraduate Studies for Yale’s undergraduate Environmental Studies major, and author of The Bet: Paul Ehrlich, Julian Simon, and Our Gamble Over Earth’s Future; and Dr. Dale Jamieson, professor of Environmental Studies and Philosophy, Affiliated Professor of Law, and Director of the Animal Studies Initiative at New York University, and author of Reason in a Dark Time: Why the Struggle to Stop Climate Change Failed – and What It Means For Our Future.

We then hosted a diverse panel of guests who considered the reality of climate change and how we can effectively talk about it.
Our guests for the panel are: Dr. Patrick Allitt, Cahoon Family Professor of American History at Emory University and author of A Climate of Crisis: America in the Age of EnvironmentalismJacqui Patterson, Director of the NAACP Environmental and Climate Justice Program; Daphne Wysham, a fellow at the Institute for Policy Studies (IPS) where she directs the Genuine Progress Project; and Maryam Adrangi, campaigner with the Council of Canadians and organizer of Rising Tide: Vancouver Coast Salish Territories.

National News Roundtable: Russia Interference & The Supreme Court

FBI James Comey (Credit: CNN)March 20, 2017 – Segment 1

We hosted a National News Roundtable, discussing topics related to the controversy around Russia and the upcoming hearings for Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch.

With: Mark Trahant, Charles R. Johnson Endowed Professor of Journalism at the University of North Dakota and independent print and media journalist who writes at Trahant ReportsDr. Richard Vatz, Professor of Rhetoric and Communication at Towson University’s Department of Instructional Leadership and Professional Development, and author of The Only Authentic Book Of Persuasion; and Dr. Kimberly Moffitt, Associate Professor of American Studies at University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) and co-editor of Blackberries and Redbones: Critical Articulations of Black Hair/Body Politics in Africana Communities.


Wikileaks: Spy Tactics of The CIA and MI5

Wikileaks (Credit: Guardian)March 17, 2017 – Segment 3

We hosted a discussion on the significance of the Wikileaks revelations about the spy tactics of the CIA and MI5, and what it means about our privacy.

With: Jenna McLaughlin, National Security Reporter at The Intercept; and Sean Gallagher, IT Editor at Ars Technica.


Affordable Care Act: Implementation & Repeal

GOP Health Care (Credit: Washington Free Beacon)March 13, 2017 – Segment 1

We hosted a debate on the effectiveness of the Affordable Care Act, the Republicans’ plan to repeal and replace it, and the possibility of a single payer plan.

With: Rachel Bovard, Director of Policy Services at the Heritage Foundation; Dr. Jonathan Weiner, Professor of Health Policy and Management at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health; and Dr. James Burdick, Professor of Surgery at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions and author of Talking About Single Payer: Health Care Equality for America.


Roundtable Conversation: Trump’s Speech Before Congress

Trump State of Union (Credit: Chicago Tribune)March 1, 2017 – Segment 1

We hosted a panel discussion on Donald Trump’s speech before the joint session of Congress, that took place on February 28, 2017.

With: Dr. Desiree Melton, Associate Professor of Philosophy at Notre Dame University of Maryland; and Bill Fletcher, Jr., Senior Scholar with the Institute for Policy Studies, editorial board member of BlackCommentator.com, co-author of The Indispensable Ally: Black Workers and the Formation of the Congress of Industrial Organizations, 1934-1941 and author of They’re Bankrupting Us! And 20 Other Myths about Unions.


Dr. Mario Livio: Churchill’s Essay On Alien Life

Mario Livio (Credit: Mario's Website"February 22, 2017 – Segment 1

I hosted a fascinating discussion with internationally known astrophysicist, bestselling author, and popular lecturer Dr. Mario Livio, based on his recent article in Nature magazine, “Winston Churchill’s essay on alien life found.”


SoundBites: Future Harvest & Trump’s EPA

January 26, 2017 – Segment 2

We hosted our newest episode of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world. We begin the episode with Part 2 of a panel Marc moderated two weeks ago at Future Harvest Casa’s 18th Annual Conference, “Cultivate the Chesapeake Foodshed.” The panel was called “Policy Scoper: What’s happening in your state capital?” We discussed what food and agriculture policies are most important to the states of Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia, Delaware and the District of Columbia, and also discussed what food and agriculture policy could look like nationally with the incoming Trump administration. We heard Part 1 of this panel discussion last week. 
The panelists were: Ed Kee, Delaware Secretary of Agriculture; Spencer Moss, Executive Director of West Virginia Food and Farm Coalition; Eric Bendfeldt, Area and Extension Specialist of Community Viability at Virginia Cooperative Extension, Virginia Tech, Virginia State University; Laine Cidlowski, Food Policy Director for the District of Columbia Office of Planning and the District of Columbia Food Policy Council, and Ferd Hoefner, Senior Strategic Advisor for the National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition.
In the second half of SoundBites we had a conversation about Trump’s pick to run the EPA, Scott Pruit, his connection to the Chesapeake Bay, and legislation before the 2017 Maryland General Assembly that could affect water in Maryland. With: Betsy Nicholas, Executive Director of Chesapeake Waterkeepers; and Dean Naujok, Potomac Riverkeeper.

Sound Bites: MD Solar Congress / End-Dependence Day

October 6, 2016 – Segment 2 Baltimore, MD -7/2/14- Denzel Mitchell, of Baltimore, harvests for cucumbers Wednesday afternoon. Mitchell owns operates his farm, "Five Seeds Farm" and provides it's vegetables to local Baltimore restaurants. Rachel Woolf/Baltimore Sun -- #7308

Our newest episode of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world. We begin the hour with a preview of the first Maryland Solar Congress, which takes place Saturday, October 15. With: Corey Ramsden, Program Director for Maryland Solar United Neighborhoods; and Tim Judson from NIRS who will be presenting at the Solar Congress for the “Grid of the Future” workshop.
The Maryland Solar Congress will take place Saturday, October 15, 10am to 2pm, at the Annapolis Friends Meeting House, 351 Dubois Road, Annapolis, MD. Click here for more information.
For our second Sound Bites segment we have preview of another important event taking place next weekend in celebration of World Food Day, which is Sunday, October 16. End-Dependence Day at #WorldFoodDay2016 is hosted by the Black Yield Institute and the Black Church Food Security Network. With: Eric Jackson, Servant-Director of the Black Yield Institute; and the Rev. Dr. Heber Brown III, Founding Director of the Black Church Food Security Network and Orita’s Cross Freedom School, and Pastor of Pleasant Hope Baptist Church.
End-Dependence Day at #WorldFoodDay2016 will take place on Sunday, October 16, 4-7pm, at Pleasant Hope Baptist Church in Baltimore. For more information click here.

Sound Bites: Bayer and Monsanto | Hip Chick Farms

hipchickSeptember 22, 2016 – Segment 3

In our newest episode of our series on our food and our world, Sound Bites, we begin the hour with a look at Bayer’s takeover of Monsanto. With: Patty Lovera, Assistant Director of Food and Water Watch, where she coordinates their food team; and Bill Freese, science policy analyst at the Center for Food Safety.
We close the show at with a look at a special agricultural operation and sustainable artisanal food production company, Hip Chick Farms. With: Serafina Palandech, Co-Founder and President of Hip Chick Farms, which she runs with her wife Jennifer Johnson, former sous chef at Chez Panisse under organic food pioneer Alice Waters and Executive Chef for the Getty Family.

Flooding and Climate Change

Photo by Todd Henn for City Paper

Photo by Todd Henn for City Paper

August 2, 2016 – Segment 2

We discuss the tragic floods in Ellicott City and other parts of our region, and their relationship to climate change. With: Mike Tidwell, Director of the Chesapeake Climate Action Network; Senator James Rosapepe, (D-District 21), Prince George’s County & Anne Arundel County; and Scott Dance, who writes about the environment and the weather for The Baltimore Sun.


Sound Bites: Controversy Over GMO Labeling | What A Fish Knows | Recipe: Seasonal Salad By Colette

What A Fish KnowsJuly 21, 2016 – Segment 3

On the newest episode of Sound Bites, our series on our food and our world. We begin the hour with a look at the controversy over the GMO Labeling bill that passed through Congress and is awaiting signature by President Obama. With Patty Lovera, Assistant Director of Food & Water Watch, where she coordinates the food team.
Then, we look at what a fish knows – literally! – with Dr. Jonathan Balcombe, author of the new book What A Fish Knows: The Inner Lives of Our Underwater Cousins. Dr. Balcombe is Director of Animal Sentience with the U.S. Humane Society Institute for Science and Policy in Washington, DC.
We close the hour with a special recipe: A Seasonal Salad with Stefano Porcile, Executive Chef at Colette in Baltimore’s Station North.

The Latest News From Space

spaceJune 30, 2016 – Segment 2

We have a conversation with Center for Emerging Media Astronomer-in-Residence Dr. Carol Christian and Tony Darnell of Deep Astronomy as they tell us about the latest news from humanity’s “eyes” in space. Tony and Carol co-host a weekly podcast called This Week in Space Telescopes.


Sound Bites: A Visit To Black Dirt Farm On The Eastern Shore| Carbon-Neutral Fertilizer | Recipe: Mussels With Colette’s Stefano Porcile

Black Dirt Farm in Preston, MDMay 26, 2016 – Segment 3

For the newest episode of Sound Bites, our series on food, agriculture, the environment, and our future. Steiner Show Senior Producers Stefanie Mavronis and Mark Gunnery visit Black Dirt Farm in Preston, Maryland, where they talk with co-owner and co-operator Blain Snipstal.

Then I talk with two scientists about an important scientific advancement that could pave the way for a potential breakthrough in farming: Carbon-neutral fertilizer production. With: Dr. Katherine A. Brown, Staff Scientist at National Renewable Energy Laboratory; and Dr. Paul King, Staff Scientist and Manager of the Photobiology Group at National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

We close the show with a mouth-watering recipe for mussels from local chef Stefano Porcile, Executive Chef at Colette restaurant in Baltimore.


Women’s Health: Birth Control & Menstruation

Birth Control (Credit: Waynewwomensclinic.com)May 25, 2016 – Segment 1

We host a discussion regarding Birth Control & Women’s Health. The newest birth control pills allow women to have no periods at all, which leads to the question: Is menstruation necessary? Our guests will address this and other issues of women’s health, with: Dr. Claudia Richardson, Medical Director of Planned Parenthood of Maryland; and Dr. Jennifer D. Williams, Assistant Professor in the Department of English and the Women’s and Gender Studies Program at Morgan State University.


Sound Bites: Backlash Against Chicken House Construction | Labor Conditions in Poultry Plants | Recipe: Catalina Byrd

ChickenFebruary 18, 2016 – Segment 2

On our newest episode of our series about our food and our world, Sound Bites, we continue our coverage of the community organizing happening on the Eastern Shore against expansion of the poultry industry. We will talk with Jeremy Cox, reporter for The Daily Times of Salisbury, about his recent article, “Backyard backlash: How Delmarva turned against poultry.”
Then we shine a light on the treatment of workers in the poultry industry, from an Oxfam report, Lives on the Line: The High Human Cost of Chicken. With Minor Sinclair, Director of the U.S. regional office of Oxfam America; and C. Shawn Boehringer, Chief Counsel of Maryland Legal Aid. Sinclair and Boehringer co-authored an article in last week’s Baltimore Sun, “Poultry processing, a thankless job.”
We close Sound Bites with a special recipe from media consultant and political strategist Catalina Byrd, who will be the featured artist and guest chef this Sunday, February 21 at NANCY by SNAC’s Sunday Breakfast with the Artists.

From The Archives: Frances Moore Lappé’s ‘EcoMind’

EcoMind: Changing the Way We Think, to Create the World We Want. (Credit: Goodreads)February 12, 2016 – Segment 3

We host a special archive edition of The Marc Steiner Show from 2011, when noted environmental author and theorist Frances Moore Lappé – best known for her groundbreaking1971 book Diet for a Small Planet – joined us to talk about her book EcoMind: Changing the Way We Think, to Create the World We Want.


Sound Bites: United Nations Comments On Curtis Bay Incinerator | Salisbury Teacher On Protecting Perdue’s Chickens

chickenFebruary 11, 2016 – Segment 3

On our newest edition of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world, we begin the hour with a look at the health implications of the proposed Curtis Bay Incinerator. With: Tim Whitehouse, Executive Director of the Chesapeake Physicians for Social Responsibility, former head of the Law and Policy Program at the Commission for Environmental Cooperation in Montreal, and former senior attorney at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in Washington, D.C.; and Dr. Gwen DuBois, Secretary of the Chesapeake Physicians for Social Responsibility Board of Directors, instructor in Medicine at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and a member of the Public Health Committee of the Maryland State Medical Society.
Last week’s statement issued by United Nations’ Working Group of Experts on People of African Descent stated: “The highest polluting industrial facilities, across a range of sectors from farming, mining to manufacturing, are more likely to be situated in poor and minority neighbourhood, including those of people of African descent. For instance, we are concerned about the possible health risks to people of African descent on account of the incinerator project in Curtis Bay, Baltimore and the lead contaminated water in Flint, Michigan. African American communities are calling for environmental justice as they are concerned that they are disproportionately exposed to environmental hazards impacting their health and standard of living.”
We close the show with a discussion with Jane Langrall Robinson, a middle-school teacher and animal advocate in Salisbury, Maryland, who caught our eye with her op-ed in the Baltimore Sun last month: Protecting Perdue’s chickens.

Sound Bites: Community Impacts of Industrial Poultry Operations On The Eastern Shore

Photo Credit: Citizens for a Better Eastern ShoreJanuary 28, 2016 – Hour 2

On our newest edition of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world, we look at Community Impacts of Industrial Poultry Operations. Last week I took a trip to Exmore, Virginia, a small town south of Chincoteague on Virginia’s Eastern Shore, where I moderated a forum for the Citizens for a Better Eastern Shore, exploring community impacts of industrial poultry operations — including the construction of poultry houses and the spreading of poultry litter on fields — at the Broadwater Academy. Just as communities on Maryland’s Eastern Shore are beginning to organize against the mass expansion of industrial poultry farming, communities in Virginia are beginning to do the same.
The panelists included:
  • Mark Brush, Associate Professor of Marine Science at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science;
  • Jillian Fry of the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health;
  • Carole Morrison, former Industrial Poultry grower, now small-scale farm grower;
  • Roger Everton and Neil Zahradka of the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality; and
  • Maria Payan, Consultant, Socially Responsible Agricultural Project.

This broadcast was edited for time. To hear the full, unedited audio from this town hall forum click here


From The Archives: Philosopher & Naturalist Diana Beresford-Kroeger

Diana Beresford-KroegerJanuary 25, 2016 – Hour 2

We rebroadcast of my interview with philosopher, naturalist, author and scientist Diana Beresford-Kroeger, whose writings combine western scientific knowledge and the traditional concepts of the ancient world.

Her books include The Sweetness of a Simple Life, The Global Forest, Arboretum Borealis, Arboretum America, and A Garden for Life. Born in Ireland, Beresford-Kroeger was orphaned in her youth and educated by elders who instructed her in the Brehon (Ireland’s indigenous system of law from Celtic times) knowledge of plants and nature. She tells us about her life and about her Bioplan, which encourages ordinary people to develop a new relationship with nature, and to join together to replant the global forest.


The Social Life of DNA: Race, Reparations, and Reconciliation After the Genome with Dr. Alondra Nelson

The Secret Life of DNA (Credit: Beacon)January 19, 2015 – Segment 2

We host a fascinating discussion with Dr. Alondra Nelson, Professor of Sociology and Dean of Social Science at Columbia University, where she has served as Director of the Institute for Research on Women, Gender, and Sexuality. Dr. Nelson talks about her new book The Social Life of DNA: Race, Reparations, and Reconciliation After the Genome. She also authored Body and Soul: The Black Panther Party and the Fight Against Medical Discrimination.


Sound Bites: How We Define Organic Food | When Cultural Food Becomes Trendy

Urban Farm (Credit: Grid Philly)January 14, 2015 – Segment 3

We play the latest episode of our series on our food and our world, Sound Bites. First we look at the definitions of organic food with Steve Savage, blogger and Agricultural Technology consultant; and Jay Martin, farmer at Provident Organic Farm.

We then have an interview with Ruth Tam, Web Producer of The Kojo Nnamdi Show and contributor to She the People, about her article for the Washington Post: “How it feels when white people shame your culture’s food – then make it trendy.”


Long-Acting Contraception and Teen Pregnancy

DaniMcClain_small1November 17, 2015 – Segment 3

We discuss long-acting contraception and teen pregnancy with Dani McClain, The Nation magazine contributing writer and Fellow at the Nation Institute, where she focuses on race and reproductive justice. McClain‘s article, “The Birth Control Revolution,” appears in the November 16 edition of The Nation.

 


Sound Bites: GMOs, Herbicides & Public Health | The State Of Oyster Farming & The Challenges Facing Oyster Farmers

Oysters, Photo Credit: chesbayprogram via CompfightAugust 27, 2015 – Segment 2

On the newest episode of our series about our food and our world, Sound Bites, we begin the hour with a report on the potential public health consequences of GMOs (genetically-modified organisms), with Dr. Charles Benbrook, co-author of “GMOs, Herbicides, and Public Health” in the New England Journal of Medicine. Dr. Benbrook is an adjunct faculty member at Washington State University.

Then, we turn to the state of oyster farming in our region as we discuss the challenges facing oyster farmers. With: Donald Webster, Region Extension Specialist at the University of Maryland Wye Research and Education Center and Chairman of the Aquaculture Coordinating Council and Maryland Oyster Advisory Commission; Johnny Shockley, third generation waterman, born and raised on Hoopers Island, and co-founder of Hooper’s Island Oyster Aquaculture Company; and Tim Wheeler, B’More Green, Baltimore Sun’s environmental reporter.


Public Health Roundtable: Heroin, Addiction, and Society

heroinJuly 29, 2015 – Segment 3

We hold a public health and society roundtable as we examine how the increase in youth HIV rates and heroin-related deaths are connected to other societal issues. With: Dr. Lorece Edwards, Director of Community Practice and Outreach and Associate Professor in the Department of Behavioral Health Sciences at the Morgan State University School of Community Health and Policy; and Jacqueline Robarge, Founder and Director of Power Inside, a project of Fusion Partnerships.


Sound Bites: Is The Safe And Accurate Food Labeling Act Denying Americans The Right To Know? | YES! Magazine: Meet the Scientist Breeding More Resilient Bees

FILE - In this Jan. 28, 2014, file photo, a hive of honeybees appears on display at the Vermont Beekeeping Supply booth at the annual Vermont Farm Show at the Champlain Valley Expo in Essex Junction, Vt. The federal government hopes to reverse America's declining honeybee and monarch butterfly populations by making more federal land bee-friendly, spending more money on research and considering the use of less pesticides. (AP Photo/Andy Duback, File)July 23, 2015 – Segment 3

It’s our newest episode of Sound Bites, our series on our food and our world. We begin the hour with a debate and analysis of a controversial bill making its way through Congress right now, called The Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act. Anti-GMO (genetically-modified organisms) advocates are calling this the DARK (“Deny Americans the Right to Know”) Act because it would not require genetically-modified foods to be labeled as such. Another critical and far-reaching impact of this bill would be that it would overturn the mandatory labeling bills in places where GMOs are currently being labeled, and make it more difficult for state and local governments to regulate GMO plants.

We hear two different perspectives on The Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act: Will Saletan, who writes about politics, science and technology for Slate and created a piece called “Unhealthy Fixation: The Misleading War on GMOs. The Food is Safe. The Rhetoric is Dangerous;” and Colin O’Neil, who is the Director of Government Affairs for the Center for Food Safety.

Next: Earlier this month we started a partnership with our longtime friends over at Yes! Magazine to produce radio stories inspired by their articles. This week’s story springs from the Yes! Summer 2015 “Make It Right” Issue: “Meet the Scientist Breeding More Resilient Bees (And 4 Other People Working to Save the Pollinators),” which tells the story of how scientists, lawyers, and even artists have set out to save our world’s most important pollinators: the honeybees.

I sat down with one of the people featured in that article, Lori Ann Burd, Environmental Health Program Director and Staff Attorney for the Center for Biological Diversity, as well as local beekeepers Bonnie Raindrop, Legislative Chair of the Central Maryland Beekeepers Association, and master beekeeperSteve McDaniel, who teaches a course on beekeeping at the Irvine Nature Center.


Dr. Freeman Hrabowski’s Holding Fast To Dreams: Empowering Youth from the Civil Rights Crusade to STEM Achievement

Dr. Freeman HrabowskiJune 5, 2015 – Segment 3

Listen to my interview with Dr. Freeman Hrabowski, President of University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), about his important book Holding Fast To Dreams: Empowering Youth from the Civil Rights Crusade to STEM Achievement.


Encore Presentation: Octavia’s Brood: Science Fiction Stories From Social Justice Activists

Octavia's BroodApril 14, 2015 – Segment 3

Do you like Social Justice, Science Fiction and Octavia Butler? Then you will love the discussions this morning, when we will be offering as premiums both Octavia Butler’s classic Kindred and Octavia’s Brood: Science Fiction Stories From Social Justice Activists edited by adrienne maree brown and Walidah Imarisha as the WEAA Spring Membership Campaign continues! Please call in and help us meet our goal: 410-319-8888. Or donate online (and please designate The Marc Steiner Show in the dropdown menu).

Our panel discusses Science Fiction and Social Justice. With: adrienne maree brown, Kresge Literary Arts Fellow, blogger at The Luscious Satyagraha, and co-Editor of Octavia’s Brood: Science Fiction Stories From Social Justice Activists; and Dr. Lester Spence, Center for Emerging Media Scholar-In-Residence and Associate Professor of Political Science and Africana Studies at Johns Hopkins University.

 


From The Archives: Diversity In Science Fiction In Honor Of Octavia Butler

Octavia ButlerApril 14, 2015 – Segment 2

Do you like Social Justice, Science Fiction and Octavia Butler? Then you will love the discussions this morning, when we will be offering as premiums both Octavia Butler’s classic Kindred and Octavia’s Brood: Science Fiction Stories From Social Justice Activists edited by adrienne maree brown and Walidah Imarisha as the WEAA Spring Membership Campaign continues! Please call in and help us meet our goal: 410-319-8888. Or donate online (and please designate The Marc Steiner Show in the dropdown menu).

In honor of Octavia Butler, our guests examine diversity in the realm of Science Fiction, with: Ytasha L. Womack, author, filmmaker, and dancer, whose latest book is Afrofuturism: The World of Black Sci Fi and Fantasyadrienne maree brown, co-editor of Octavia’s Brood, sci-fi writer, and Emergent Strategy facilitator; K Tempest Bradford, speculative fiction writer, media critic, and board member of the Carl Brandon Society, dedicated to supporting and highlighting people of color in science fiction, fantasy, and horror media; and Jason T. Harris, author and editor of REDLINES: Baltimore 2028.


From The Archives: Marc Interviews Octavia Butler

Octavia ButlerApril 14, 2015 – Segment 1

Do you like Social Justice, Science Fiction and Octavia Butler? Then you will love the discussions this morning, when we will be offering as premiums both Octavia Butler’s classic Kindred and Octavia’s Brood: Science Fiction Stories From Social Justice Activists edited by adrienne maree brown and Walidah Imarisha as the WEAA Spring Membership Campaign continues! Please call in and help us meet our goal: 410-319-8888. Or donate online (and please designate The Marc Steiner Show in the dropdown menu).

We listen back to my interview from January 21, 2004, with renowned Science Fiction author Octavia Butler. The recipient of a MacArthur “Genius” Grant and both the Hugo and Nebula awards, Butler passed away in February 2006.


Diana Beresford-Kroeger and the Global Forest

dianaApril 3, 2015 – Segment 1

We hear a fascinating and inspirational interview with Diana Beresford-Kroeger, philosopher, naturalist, world-recognized author and scientist whose writings combine western scientific knowledge and the traditional concepts of the ancient world.  Her books include  The Sweetness of a Simple LifeThe Global Forest, Arboretum Borealis, Arboretum America, and A Garden for Life. Born in Ireland, Beresford-Kroeger was orphaned in her youth and educated by elders who instructed her in the Brehon (Ireland’s indigenous system of law from Celtic times) knowledge of plants and nature. She tells us about her life and about her Bioplan, which encourages ordinary people to develop a new relationship with nature, and to join together to replant the global forest.


Sound Bites: Fracking | Phosphorous Management Tool | African Fried Rice

frackingMarch 10, 2015 – Segment 3

In our latest installment of our series about our food and our world, Sound Bites, we begin the hour with a debate on fracking in Maryland, with: Drew Cobbs, Executive Director, Maryland Petroleum Council; and Mike Tidwell, Founder and Director of the Chesapeake Climate Action Network, and author of The Ravaging Tide: Strange Weather, Future Katrinas and the Race to Save America’s Coastal Cities.

Then we hear an update on the Phosphorous Management Tool, in light of Maryland Governor Larry Hogan’s proposal to curb poultry manure runoff from Eastern Shore farms, with Maryland State Senator Paul Pinksy (Democrat-District 22), Vice Chair of the Education, Health, and Environmental Affairs Committee and sponsor of SB 0257, “Agriculture – Nutrient Management – Phosphorus Management Tool.”

We close out the show with a tasty treat, a recipe for African Fried Rice from Michael Twitty, Culinary Historian of African and African American Foodways and blogger at Afroculinaria.


From The Archives: Are We Over-Medicating Our Children?

ritalinFebruary 17, 2015 – Segment 3

Listen in to a special 2012 archive edition of The Marc Steiner Show, on prescription medications and children. I talk with Dr. Alan Sroufe, Professor Emeritus of Psychology at the University of Minnesota’s Institute of Child Development, who at one time believed that Ritalin was as necessary for children suffering from attention deficit disorder as insulin is for diabetics. Over the last 40 years of reviewing the drugs, however, his position has changed, and he believes that these drugs are dangerously over-prescribed.


Vaccine, Measles, and Children: Is Worry Over Vaccines Misplaced?

vaccineFebruary 4, 2015 – Segment 3

We turn to the topic of vaccinations, measles, and children, with: Dr. Julia A. McMillan, Professor of Pediatrics, Executive Vice Chair of the Department of Pediatrics, Associate Dean for Graduate Medical Education, and Designated Institutional Official at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine; and Dr. Andrea A. Berry, Assistant Professor, Division of Infectious Diseases and Tropical Pediatrics Departments of Pediatrics and Medicine and Center for Vaccine Development at the University of Maryland School of Medicine.

 


From The Archives: Mario Livio Asks, ‘Is God a Mathematician?’

cosmos-2December 15, 2014 – Segment 3

From ancient times to the present, scientists and philosophers have marveled at how such a seemingly abstract discipline as mathematics could so perfectly explain the natural world. More than that — mathematics has often made predictions, for example, about subatomic particles or cosmic phenomena that were unknown at the time, but later were proven to be true. Is mathematics ultimately invented or discovered? If, as Einstein insisted, mathematics is a product of human thought that is independent of experience, how can it so accurately describe and even predict the world around us?

These are the questions posed by Mario Livio, an internationally known astrophysicist who works at the Hubble Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, in his latest book Is God a Mathematician?  He joins Marc in studio to discuss mathematics, the fabric of reality, God, and how it all may be working together.


From The Archives: Dr. Temple Grandin On ‘The Autistic Brain’

Temple GrandinDecember 12, 2014 – Segment 4

Listen in to another special archive edition of the Show, as I talk with the fascinating and inspirational author and scientist Dr. Temple Grandin. Grandin, professor of Animal Science at Colorado State University and a consultant on animal behavior to the livestock industry, talks about her 2013 book The Autistic Brain: Thinking Across the Spectrum. She offers her unique perspective on autism, agriculture, and creativity.


Sound Bites: Maryland Environmental & Agricultural Policy — What Is Governor O’Malley’s Legacy?

frackingDecember 2, 2014 – Segment 3

In the latest installment of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world, we host a Maryland Environmental and Agricultural Policy Roundtable on fracking and phosphorous management.

Our guests are: Joanna Diamond, Executive Director of Environment Maryland; Mitch Jones, Director of the Common Resources Program at Food & Water Watch; David A. Vanko, Dean of the Jess and Mildred Fisher College of Science and Mathematics at Towson University and chairman of the Maryland Marcellus Shale Safe Drilling Initiative Advisory Commission; and Tim Wheeler, reporter for B’More Green, the Baltimore Sun‘s environmental blog.


Sound Bites: Dangers of Methane | “Bee-Friendly” Plants Actually Harmful To Bees | Baltimore’s Park Heights Farmers Market

Melting of Arctic ice and frozen Siberian tundraNovember 4, 2014 – Segment 4

Listen to a special archive edition of Sound Bites. First we hear a commentary from Jamie Henn, co-Founder and Strategy and Communications Director of 350.org, about the dangers of methane being released from the earth as a result of the melting of Arctic ice and frozen Siberian tundra.

Next we talk with Meme Thomas, Director of Baltimore Honey and maker of B’more Hon E brand raw micro local honey, about a recent report on how supposedly “bee-friendly” plants purchased from some of the big box stores actually contain neonicotinoid pesticides, believed to be responsible in part for the declining bee population.

We close out the show with a look at the Baltimore’s Park Heights Farmers Market, which is open every Wednesday at the corner of Belvedere and Park Heights Avenues. We will hear from: Sache Jones, Food Justice Consultant for Park Heights Community Health Alliance and Manager of the AFYA Community Teaching Garden in Park Heights; Mia Loving, community organizer, entrepreneur, mother and wife; and Willie Flowers, Executive Direct of Park Heights Community Health Alliance.

 


Ebola: Quarantines and Transmission

ebola5October 29, 2014 – Segment 3

We discuss some issues around Ebola, including the question of quarantines and how the virus is transmitted.  We are joined by: Dr. Adil Shamoo,Associate Fellow of the Institute for Policy Studies, Senior Analyst for Foreign Policy in Focus, and author of Equal Worth – When Humanity Will Have Peace; Dr. Zackary Berger, Assistant Professor of General Internal Medicine at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and Associate Faculty at the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics; and Dr. Dougbeh Nyan, Liberian Infectious Disease Specialist; and Dr. Meryl Nass, an internal medicine physician.

 


Naomi Klein on Capitalism and the Climate

kleinOctober 27, 2014 – Segment 4

We are joined by Naomi Klein, award-winning journalist, syndicated columnist for The Nation and the Guardian and author of the international bestseller, The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism. Klein joins us to talk about her new book, This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. The Climate, which is the 2014 winner of the prestigious Hilary Weston Writers’ Trust Prize for Nonfiction.

LINK

 


Ebola Update: What We Know, The Politics and Treatment

ebolaOctober 21, 2014 – Segment 2

We continue our conversation on Ebola, and talk about health and political issues surrounding Ebola, treatment, public health implications, and Ebola in the United States. We’re joined by Dr. Lawrence Brown, activist, public health consultant, and Assistant Professor of Public Health in the School of Community Health and Policy at Morgan State University; Dr. Benjamin Hale, writer forSlate, Associate Professor of Philosophy and Environmental Studies at the University of Colorado-Boulder, Vice President of the International Society of Environmental Ethics and co-Editor of the journal Ethics, Policy & Environment; and Emira Woods, Director of Social Impact at Thoughtworks, a software consulting firm dedicated to economic and social justice, and Associate Fellow at the Institute for Policy Studies.

LINK


Climate Change Marches and Summits

climateSeptember 26, 2014 – Segment 2

In light of the People’s Climate March last Sunday and the United Nations Climate Summit this week, we examine key issues in the debate over climate change, with: Jacqueline Patterson, Director of the NAACP Climate Justice Initiative; Brentin Mock, Justice Editor for Grist; and Mike Tidwell, founder and director of the Chesapeake Climate Action Network and author of The Ravaging Tide: Strange Weather, Future Katrinas, and the Race to Save America’s Coastal Cities. 

LINK


Sound Bites: Debating Agritourism | Perdue’s Power | CLF Aquaponics Project & Pesto Basil Recipe

agritourismSeptember 23, 2014 – Segment 3

We kick off our newest edition of Sound Bites with a discussion and debate on AgriTourism, in light of a controversial bill introduced last week by Baltimore County Third District Councilman Todd Huff. What does AgriTourism mean? How does it benefit farmers? Why is this such a hot-button issue across the country? Our guests will be: Teresa Moore, Executive Director at The Valleys Planning Council; and Wayne McGinnis, farmer and Baltimore County Planning Board member.

 Then we turn to poultry giant Perdue Farms, whose Chairman Jim Perdue was quoted in the Baltimore Business Journal as saying that they have no seat at the table in Maryland. Peter Jensen, author and editorial writer for The Baltimore Sun, begged to differ in today’s editorial, and he joins us to discuss it.

We close out the show with a special basil cashew pesto recipe from the Hopkins’ Center for a Livable Future Aquaponics Project at the Cylburn Arboretum!

LINK


Sound Bites: Can GMOs Feed a Hot & Hungry World? | Urban Beekeeping | Recipe from Boone Street Farm: Ground Cherry Salsa

Boone Street FarmSeptember 2, 2014 – Segment 3

It’s a brand new episode of Sound Bites. We’ll talk about a recent article from The Nation that asks the question Can GMOs Feed a Hot and Hungry World? We’ll speak with the author of that article, Madeline Ostrander, who is a contributing editor to YES! Magazine and a freelance writer based in Seattle. We’ll also be joined by Dr. Eduardo Blumwald who studies genetic engineering at UC Davis; and Patty Lovera, Assistant Director of Food & Water Watch, where she coordinates the Food Team.

Then, we are joined by Alison Gillespie, author of Hives in the City: Keeping Honey Bees Alive in an Urban World, for a fascinating conversation on urban beekeeping.

To close out this week’s Sound Bites, former Sound Bites intern Maggie Dier brings us a recipe for ground cherry salsa from Cheryl Carmona and Dana Rushovich of Boone Street Farm, an urban farm in East Baltimore.

LINK


Sound Bites: How We Talk About Climate Change

polarbearsAugust 26, 2014 – Segment 3

It’s a brand new episode of Sound Bites where the topic is Climate Change, and our discussion springs from an article by Charles Mann in this month’s Atlantic Monthly: “How to Talk about Climate Change so People Will Listen.” First we examine the historical context of the climate change debate. Our guests are: Dr. Paul Sabin, associate professor in the Department of History at Yale University, Director of Undergraduate Studies for Yale’s undergraduate Environmental Studies major, and author of The Bet: Paul Ehrlich, Julian Simon, and Our Gamble Over Earth’s Future; and Dr. Dale Jamieson, professor of Environmental Studies and Philosophy, Affiliated Professor of Law, and Director of the Animal Studies Initiative at New York University, and author of Reason in a Dark Time: Why the Struggle to Stop Climate Change Failed – and What It Means For Our Future.

We close out Sound Bites with a diverse panel of guests who consider the reality of climate change and how we can effectively talk about it. Our guests are: Dr. Patrick Allitt, Cahoon Family Professor of American History at Emory University and author of A Climate of Crisis: America in the Age of EnvironmentalismJacqui Patterson, Director of the NAACP Environmental and Climate Justice Program;Daphne Wysham, a fellow at the Institute for Policy Studies (IPS) where she directs the Genuine Progress Project; and Maryam Adrangi, campaigner with the Council of Canadians and organizer with a member of Rising Tide: Vancouver Coast Salish Territories.

LINK


Technology and the Brain

Text Distracted DrivingAugust 14, 2014 – Segment 4

We bring you a special archive edition of The Marc Steiner ShowTechnology and the Brain. We explore how the technological devices that have become commonplace in our society have altered the way we think, with: Steven Yantis, Chairman of the Psychological and Brain Sciences Department of Johns Hopkins University; and Dr. Sergey Golitsynskiy, Assistant Professor of Communication at the University of Northern Iowa.

LINK


Sound Bites: US Apples Banned in EU | Chicken Nuggets | Eating Wildly

applesAugust 12, 2014 – Segment 3

In this week’s edition of Sound Bites, listen in to find out why U.S.apples have been banned in Europe, with: Tom Philpott, Mother Jones Food and Agriculture correspondent; Sonya Lunder, Senior Analyst with the Environmental Working Group; and Marilyn Dolan, Executive Director of the Alliance for Food and Farming.

Then we take a look at what’s in your chicken nuggets! Tom Philpott, Mother Jones Food and Agriculture correspondent, shares some unsettling facts about the ingredients in those finger-sized treats that have become a staple of fast food America.

We close out the show with Ava Chin, author of Eating Wildly: Foraging for Life, Love and the Perfect Meal, who tells us about the wild edibles you can find out in the world in the month of August.

LINK


What’s Gotten Into Us? Staying Healthy in a Toxic World

Plastics and chemicalsAugust 7, 2014 – Segment 3

Remember the scare over BPA in plastic water bottles? Have you ever wondered what other chemicals are in common products and how they effect us? Our guest today is McKay Jenkins, who set out to find out about the many (and often unregulated) chemicals we’re exposed to every day. He is the author of the book What’s Gotten Into Us? Staying Healthy in a Toxic World.

This segment originally aired June 6, 2011.

LINK


Neuroeducation and Arts Integration

brainsAugust 6, 2014 – Segment 3

Dr.  Charles Limb and Dr. Mariale Hardiman are pioneers in the field of neuro-education.  In lay terms, that means applying what we know about the brain to help teachers be more effective.  One important area of their research is arts integration – using the arts to teach traditional academic disciplines.  So today we sat down with them to talk about whether putting more art in the classroom – whether it’s theater in history class, music in math, or poetry in chemistry – can help kids learn.

Dr. Charles Limb is Director of Research for the Johns Hopkins School of Education’s Neuro Education Initiative, Associate Professor of Otolaryngology at Johns Hopkins Medical School, and Faculty at the Peabody Conservatory of Music.
Dr. Mariale Hardiman is Assistant Dean of Urban School Partnerships at the Johns Hopkins University, a former principal in the Baltimore City Public School System, and author of Connecting Brain Research with Effective Teaching: The Brain-Targeted Teaching Model

Read Deborah Rudacille’s article, This is Your Brain on Art, in Urbanite Magazine.

LINK


The Unwanted Sound of Everything We Want

Sound and NoiseJuly 17, 2013 – Segment 2

Do you ever feel as though you are on a noise overload? Listen in on our discussion with author Garret Keizer about his book The Unwanted Sound of Everything We Want: A Book About Noise. We talk about the point at which sound becomes noise, as well as the politics of what we hear.

LINK


Sound Bites: Dangers of Methane | “Bee-Friendly” Plants Actually Harmful To Bees | Baltimore’s Park Heights Farmers Market

"Bee Friendly" plants harmful to beesJuly 15, 2014 – Segment 4

In the newest edition of Sound Bites, we hear a commentary from Jamie Henn, 350.org co-founder and Strategy and Communications Director, about the dangers of methane being released from the earth as a result of the melting of Arctic ice and frozen Siberian tundra.

Next we talk with Meme Thomas, Director of Baltimore Honey and maker of B’more Hon E brand raw micro local honey, about a recent report on how supposedly “bee-friendly” plants, purchased from some of the big box stores, actually contain neonicotinoid pesticides, which are thought to be responsible in part for the declining bee population.

We close out the show with a look at Baltimore’s Park Heights Farmers Market, which is open every Wednesday at the corner of Belvedere and Park Heights Avenues from 9:00am to 2:00pm. We will hear from: Sache Jones, Food Justice Consultant for Park Heights Community Health Alliance and Manager of the AFYA Community Teaching Garden in Park Heights; Mia Loving, community organizer, entrepreneur, mother and wife; and Willie Flowers, Executive Direct of Park Heights Community Health Alliance.

LINK


Sound Bites: Is Soylent The End of Food? | How The Food Giants Hooked Us | CSX Derailment Pollutes James River | Recipe: Garlic Scapes

SoylentMay 13, 2014 – Segment 4

In the latest edition of Sound Bites, I talk with Bhaskar Sunkara, founding Editor of Jacobin and a Senior Editor at In These Times, on Sunkara’s recent op-ed for Al Jazeera America called “Let’s Embrace the End of Food,” about soylent, a powdered meal replacement.

Then, Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter Michael Moss joins us to talk about his book Salt Sugar Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us.

We also look at the April 30th CSX train derailment in Lynchburg, Virginia, which dumped more than 20,000 gallons of crude into the James River, with Pat Calvert, Upper James Riverkeeper, and Jamie Brunkow, Lower James Riverkeeper.

We close out the show with a recipe for garlic scapes from Kristen Carbone of Radix Farm.

LINK


Net Neutrality

netMay 8, 2014 – Segment 3

We discuss net neutrality with: Todd O’Boyle, Program Director of the Media and Democracy Reform Initiative at Common Cause; Brent Skorup, Research Fellow at the Mercatus Center at the George Mason University; Dr. Jared Ball, Associate Professor of Media Studies in the School of Global Journalism and Communication at Morgan State University who can be found online at iMiXWHATiLiKE.org; and Dr. Margaret Flowers, co-Director of ItsOurEconomy.us and co-Host of Clearing the FOG (Forces of Greed) Radio Show, who is part of an ongoing Net Neutrality Solidarity People’s Firewall Action that is taking place in Washington, DC, now through May 15.

LINK


Sound Bites: Eat Less Chicken / American Apples Banned in Europe / The Bay Bridge Ospreys

Why american apples just got banned in EuropeApril 29, 2014 – Segment 3

We begin our newest edition of Sound Bites with a look at a commentary that was recently published in the Baltimore Sun, called “Eat less chicken” which addresses the amount of water used in raising chickens. We will talk with the author of the commentary, Paul Shapiro, who is Vice President of Farm Animal Protection for the Humane Society of the United States.

Next we look at a new development around American apples being banned in Europe, with: Tom Philpott, Mother Jones Food and Agriculture correspondent whose recent article is titled: “Why American Apples Just Got Banned in Europe;” Sonya Lunder, Senior Analyst with the Environmental Working Group; and Marilyn Dolan, Executive Director of the Alliance for Food and Farming.

We close out the show with a look at the “Bay Bridge Ospreys,” a pair of ospreys who were persistent about building their nest in front of the traffic camera on the bridge. Listen in to hear how this situation was resolved, with Tim Wheeler, reporter for B’More Green, the Baltimore Sun‘s environmental blog, who has been covering this story.

LINK


Sound Bites: Dr. George Washington Carver

georgewashingtoncarverApril 8, 2014 – Segment 2

This week is the WEAA Spring Membership Drive, so tune in for compelling topics and wonderful premiums! Now is your opportunity to support the station you have come to love: WEAA, THE Voice of the Community. Call 410-319-8888 or visit weaa.org to make your pledge of support during the show.

We discuss the life and legacy of Dr. George Washington Carver, in a special edition of Sound Bites! Our guests  are: Mark Hersey, author of My Work Is That Of Conservation: An Environmental Biography of George WashingtonCarver; Denzel Mitchell, founder and Farm Manager of Five Seeds Family Farm and Apiary; and Tonya Bolden, author of the children’s book George Washington Carver.

LINK

 


Cyber Security & Data Breaches: What It Indicates About The Future

cyberFebruary 27, 2014 – Segment 3

We turn to the topic of cyber security – or insecurity – in a discussion on the data breaches at Target and the University of Maryland. Our panelists include: Dr. Lisa Yeo, Assistant Professor of Information Systems and Operations Management at Loyola University Maryland’s Sellinger School of Business; and Dr. Rick Forno, Director of the University of Maryland Baltimore County’s Graduate Cybersecurity Program, Assistant Director of UMBC’s Center for Cybersecurity, and Junior Affiliate Scholar at the Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society (CIS).

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Remembering Science Fiction Author Octavia Butler

Octavia ButlerFebruary 21, 2014 – Segment 2

We listen back to an interview from January 21, 2004, with renowned science fiction author Octavia Butler. The recipient of a MacArthur “Genius” Grant and both the Hugo and Nebula awards, Butler passed away in February 2006.

This segment originally aired January 21, 2004.

LINK


Sound Bites: St. Brigid | Beginnings of a Delmarva Food Hub | Do GMOs Matter? | ShorePower Project

Food HubJanuary 28, 2014 – Segment 4

We’re talking food and farming, in our newest edition of Sound Bites! February 1 is St. Brigid’s Day – did you know she is the patron saint of cattle? After a brief commentary on this curious saint, we talk about creating a Delmarva Food Hub, with Cleo Braver, owner of Cottingham Farm in Easton, Maryland.

Then, we ask the question: Do GMOs matter? You will hear from: Tom PhilpottMother Jones Food and Agriculture correspondent; and Nathanael Johnson, food writer for Grist.

We close out the show with a look at a project designed to help municipalities on Maryland’s Eastern Shore significantly reduce their energy expenditures, called the ShorePower Project. Here to talk with us about this exciting new initiative is Briggs Cunningham, Energy Programs Manager at the Center For Environment & Society at Washington College.

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Sound Bites: Future Harvest: Farming For Profit & Stewardship Conference | GMOs & Cheerios | Maureen Ogle’s “In Meat We Trust”

General Mills' CheeriosJanuary 14, 2014 – Segment 4

In the newest edition of Sound Bites, we get a sneak preview of the 15th Annual Farming for Profit and Stewardship Conference hosted by Future Harvest CASA, which will be held this weekend. Our guests will include: Amanda Behrens, Future Harvest CASA board member and Project Manager with the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future Food Mapping project; Denzel Mitchell, Founder of Five Seeds Farm & Apiary in Baltimore County; and Errol Mattox, who will be serving as a panelist on the conference’s “Founding Farmers” panel.

Then, we turn to GMOs with Nathanael Johnson, who teaches at the University of California, Berkeley and writes about food for the online publication GristAmong other topics, Johnson discusses General Mills’ decision to stop using GMOs in Cheerios.

We close out the show looking at the longstanding relationship of Americans and meat, with Dr. Maureen Ogle, historian and author of In Meat We Trust: An Unexpected History of Carnivore America.

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Sound Bites: Salmonella & Flaws In Poultry Safety System | Food, Ag and Environment Stories to Watch in 2014 | This Year’s Biggest Meat Stories

Top Meat Stories of 2013January 7, 2014 – Segment 4

Are you careful with uncooked poultry? In the newest edition of Sound Bites, we look at a recent study by the Pew Charitable Trusts that highlights weaknesses in the poultry safety system that have led to outbreaks of salmonella. With Sandra Eskin, author of the study and Director, Safe Food Project.

Then, we examine the big issues in the year ahead in Food, Agriculture and the Environment, with our panel of commentators: Jenny Hopkinson, who covers Agriculture and Food Policy issues for POLITICO Pro; Scott Dodd, Editor of OnEarth.org; Tim Wheeler, Reporter for B’More Green, The Baltimore Sun‘s environmental blog; and Tom Horton, Professor of Practice in Environmental Studies at Salisbury University who covered the Environment for The Baltimore Sun for 35 years.

We close out the show with Tom Philpott, Mother Jones Food and Agriculture blogger, who will talk about The Five Biggest Meat Stories of 2013.

LINK


Chilling Temperatures: Polar Vortex and Climate Change

Polar vortexJanuary 7, 2014 – Segment 2

Daphne Wysham, Fellow at the Institute for Policy Studies, where she directs their Sustainable Energy and Economy Network and the Genuine Progress Project, joins us to discuss the chilling temperatures, the polar vortex, and  climate change.

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Mario Livio’s “Brilliant Blunders: Colossal Mistakes by Great Scientists That Changed Our Understanding of Life and the Universe”

Mario LivioDecember 13, 2013 – Segment 3

We turn to Cosmic topics, when astrophysicist Mario Livio talks about his new book Brilliant Blunders: From Darwin to Einstein – Colossal Mistakes by Great Scientists That Changed Our Understanding of Life and the Universe.

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Sound Bites: MDA Pulls Phosphorus Management Regs | Whitelock Community Farm Expands | Recipe: Sweet Potato Biscuits From Blacksauce

Whitelock Community Farm in Reservoir HillNovember 19, 2013 – Segment 3

This week on Sound Bites, we begin with a follow-up to the announcement last Friday that the Maryland Department of Agriculture (MDA) has withdrawn proposed phosphorus management regulations. Phosphorus is a major contributor to pollution in the Chesapeake Bay. The regulations would control when and how farmers could apply manure to their crops. The regulations were withdrawn after hundreds of farmers, at public meetings, protested their implementation. Guests include:

Then, we return to Whitelock Community Farm in Baltimore’s Reservoir Hill neighborhood. We will take a look at what is current being produced on this street corner farm and at their new initiative to expand onto a lot across the street from their current location. They will hold an event this weekend to raise funds for this initiative. Our guests will be: Victoria Day, Reservoir Hill community member; and Alison Worman, Farm Manager at Whitelock Community Farm.

We close out the show with a Thanksgiving recipe from Damian Mosley of Blacksauce Kitchen! He tells us how to make sweet potato biscuits.

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Sound Bites: Food Safety Modernization Act | GMOs & Public Opinion | Black Farmers and Urban Gardeners Conference

GMO measure in Washington stateNovember 12, 2013 – Segment 3

We begin the newest episode of our series on the food system, Sound Bites, talking about the Food Safety Modernization Act and what it means for small farmers, with Michael Tabor, a farmer who supplies Baltimore-area universities with GMO-free, sustainably-grown produce and has run a farm stand in the Adams Morgan neighborhood in Washington for 40 years. He wrote the widely-circulated piece, “Food Safety Modernization Act Threatens Fresh, Health and Sustainably-Grown Food.”

Then, we talk with Erin Sagen, member of the Online Editorial Team for YES! Magazine, about GMOs and how public opinion shifts after pro-GMO money pours into a community.

We close the show with a report back from the Black Farmers and Urban Gardeners conference that took place this past weekend in New York City, with Imani Bryant, who is working on a Masters of Public Health from Morgan State University and specializes in food justice issues; and Xavier Brown, Director of Urban Agriculture for The Green Scheme, a DC nonprofit organization that aims to educate people of diverse cultural backgrounds about their role in the environmental movement.

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Bending Time: The Adventures of Emery Jones, Boy Science Wonder

Emery JonesOctober 31, 2013 – Segment 3

It’s time for The Adventures of Emery Jones, Boy Science Wonder! National Book Award-winning novelist and scholar Dr. Charles Johnson will be talking about the book that he and his daughter Elisheba Johnson co-authored (and he illustrated), the first in a series, titled Bending Time: The Adventures of Emery Jones, Boy Science Wonder (Volume 1), about a Black child prodigy and scientific “whiz kid.”

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Sound Bites – Michael Moss on Salt Sugar Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us

Michael Moss, author of Salt Sugar FatOctober 15, 2013 – Hour 2

This week is the WEAA Fall Membership Drive, so tune in for compelling topics and wonderful premiums! Now is your opportunity to support the station you have come to love: WEAA, THE Voice of the Community. Call 410-319-8888 or visit weaa.org to make your pledge of support during the show.

In the latest episode of Sound Bites, we look at how “Big Food” has lured us into eating high-fat, low-nutrition foods over the past century, when Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter Michael Moss joins us to discuss his book Salt Sugar Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us.

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Mark Hertsgaard On Climate Change

climate changeOctober 11, 2013 – Segment 5

Stay tuned at 10:00 when we turn to climate change and some recent encouraging trends, with Mark Hertsgaard, fellow of the New America Foundation, and author, most recently, of Hot: Living Through the Next Fifty Years on Earth.

Check out Hertsgaard’s latest articles:

 30 Years to Catastrophe—Bill McKibben’s Mission to Save Us

Will Solar Save the Planet?

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Sound Bites: Government Shutdown’s Impact on Food | Arsenic in Animal Feed | Trans-Pacific Partnership & Food Safety

The impacts of the government shutdown on foodOctober 8, 2013 – Segment 3

We will discuss how the government shutdown is affecting food and agriculture on the latest edition of Sound BitesTim Murphy, a reporter in Mother Jones‘ DC bureau, and Michael J. Wilson, Director of Maryland Hunger Solutions, will join us in this discussion.

Then we move into a discussion about new restrictions on arsenic in animal feed with Keeve Nachman, Director of the Center for a Livable Future‘s Farming for the Future Program and co-author of a report on arsenic-based drugs used in chickens.

Finally, we turn to a massive free trade agreement called the Trans-Pacific Partnership, or TPP, and examine how its implementation may affect food safety. Our guests include: Daren Bakst, Research Fellow in Agricultural Policy for the Heritage Foundation; and Mitch Jones, Director of the Common Resources Program at Food and Water Watch.

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Anniversary of Henrietta Lacks’ Death: Rebecca Skloot on The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

Screen Shot 2013-10-04 at 5.42.06 PMOctober 4, 2013 – Segment 1

We talk with bestselling author Rebecca Skloot about her new book, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks.  The book follows the life of an African-American woman whose cells were taken without her consent, and which became the first immortal cell line.

This is a rebroadcast from April 19, 2010.

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Breathing’s Impact On Health And Wellness

JessicaSeptember 25, 2013 – Segment 3

Jessica Dibb, Founder, Spiritual Director, and Principal Teacher of Inspiration Consciousness School, joins us to speak about the impact of breathing on health and wellness.

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Hacking: Implications For Our Privacy & Security

Hacking PriusSeptember 9, 2013 – Segment 4

We turn to the topic of hacking. At recent hacking conventions in Las Vegas, cybersecurity experts revealed how easy it is to hack everything from cars to pacemakers. General Keith B. Alexander, Director of the National Security Agency, spoke at one of the conferences about his organization’s use of technology to spy on people.

We will look at these and other issues of cybersecurity with:

  • Edward Ericson Jr., staff writer for the Baltimore City Paper;
  • Dr. Rick Forno, Director of the University of Maryland Baltimore County’s Graduate Cybersecurity Program, Assistant Director of UMBC’s Center for Cybersecurity, and Junior Affiliate Scholar at the Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society (CIS);
  • and Stephen Bono, CEO and President of Independent Security Evaluators, a Baltimore-based network and computer security firm.

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Hacking: Implications For Our Privacy & Security

Hacking PriusAugust 15, 2013 – Segment 5

We turn to the topic of hacking. At recent hacking conventions in Las Vegas, cybersecurity experts revealed how easy it is to hack everything from cars to pacemakers. General Keith B. Alexander, Director of the National Security Agency, spoke at one of the conferences about his organization’s use of technology to spy on people.

We will look at these and other issues of cybersecurity with:

  • Edward Ericson Jr., staff writer for the Baltimore City Paper;
  • Dr. Rick Forno, Director of the University of Maryland Baltimore County’s Graduate Cybersecurity Program, Assistant Director of UMBC’s Center for Cybersecurity, and Junior Affiliate Scholar at the Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society (CIS);
  • and Stephen Bono, CEO and President of Independent Security Evaluators, a Baltimore-based network and computer security firm.

[LINK]


Sound Bites: Rural MD Needs Immigration Reform | Update: Gather Baltimore | Why Bees Are Dying

Why Bees Are DyingAugust 13, 2013 – Segment 4

It’s another episode of Sound Bites. We start by talking to Lucie L. Snodgrass, Maryland state executive director of the USDA’s Farm Service Agency about an op-ed she wrote for The Baltimore Sun titled, “Rural Maryland needs immigration reform.”

Later in the hour, current OSI-Baltimore Community Fellow Arthur Morgan gives us an update on his project Gather Baltimore, a volunteer-based program that collects and gleans fresh produce donated by farmer’s markets and farms for distribution to people with limited access to healthy food in Baltimore. He talks about a few upcoming events and initiatives.

Then, we discuss a new study done by the University of Maryland and the US Department of Agriculture that points to why large numbers of bees are dying. Scientists identified a mixture of pesticides and fungicides that contaminate pollen and subsequently kill bees. Joining us are:

  • Dr. Jeff Pettis, Research Leader in the Bee Research Laboratory for the Agricultural Research Service at the U.S. Department of Agriculture who co-authored the report;
  • Steve McDaniel, certified master beekeeper and past President of the Maryland State Beekeepers Association;
  • and Meme Thomas, director of Baltimore Honey, a nonprofit that works to maximize local honeybee pollination coverage for local food security.

[LINK]


Family of Henrietta Lacks, Unwitting Source of HeLa Cells, To Get Some Control Over Genome

Henrietta LacksAugust 12, 2013 – Segment 2

Last week the National Institutes of Health announced an agreement with the family of Henrietta Lacks – whose cells were collected and used for research, without her knowledge or permission, by Johns Hopkins University over 50 years ago – that will finally give them recognition and some degree of control over how the genome of these important cells will be used in the future.

We are joined by Ron Lacks, Henrietta Lacks’ grandson, as well as Dr. Gloria Hoffman, professor of Biology at Morgan State University.

[LINK]


Sound Bites: Warehouse-Raised Fish | McDonald’s & Fast Food Workers | Farmer Profile: Charles Wright

A Baltimore lab aims to take the science of growing clean, healthy salt-water fish to the global marketplaceJuly 30, 2013 – Hour 2

On a new edition of Sound Bites, we ask the question: as our waterways become more polluted, will fish be raised in warehouses in our citiesVan Smith, senior staff writer for the Baltimore City Paper, and Dr. Yonathan Zohar, professor and chair of the Department of Marine Biotechnology and head of the Aquaculture Research Center at the Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology at UMBC, join us to discuss the future of fish.

Then Mother Jones food and agriculture blogger Tom Philpott joins us to talk about the latest on McDonalds and fast food workers. He also shares a recipe for gazpacho, a cold, refreshing, tomato-based soup.

We conclude Sound Bites with a profile of an Eastern Shore man who is still farming the land that has been in his family for generations: Charles Wright, owner of Wright’s Market and Cornerstone Farms.

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Sound Bites: Urban Farming, No SNAP Benefits For Violent Offenders, & A Fermentation Recipe

Sandor Katz, FermentationJuly 23, 2013 – Segment 3

It’s another live episode of Sound Bites!

Denzel Mitchell, founder of Five Seeds Farm & Apiary; Blain  and Reagan Hooton, farmer at the Baltimore Free Farm, join us to talk about urban farming.

Then, we debate the Senate’s amendments to the Farm Bill, which would block SNAP benefits for life to those recipients who have at any time been convicted of one of a Senate-designated list of violent crimes, with Tad DeHaven, state and federal budget analyst for the Cato Institute, and Brentin Mock, New Orleans-based journalist and reporter for Colorlines.

We end this week’s Sound Bites with Sandor Ellix Katz, who shares a fermentation recipe. He is a fermentation revivalist and author of Wild FermentationThe Revolution Will Not Be Microwaved, and The Art of Fermentation.

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Robert McChesney On The “Digital Disconnect”

Robert McChesneyJuly 17, 2013 – Hour 1

Author Robert McChesney joins us to talk about his latest book, Digital Disconnect: How Capitalism Is Turning the Internet Against Democracy, about the relationship between economic power and the digital world.

 

 

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Sound Bites: Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership | Nutrient Trading & The Chesapeake Bay | A Kayak Trip Through The Delmarva Peninsula

Tom Horton, Delmarva PeninsulaJuly 9, 2013 – Segment 3

On a new episode of Sound Bites, we discuss what the newly-negotiated Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) with the European Union might mean for food, agriculture, and the environment. With: Simon Lester, trade policy analyst at the Herbert A. Stiefel Center for Trade Policy Studies at the CATO Institute; and Katherine Paul, Associate Director of the Organic Consumers Association.

Later in the episode we discuss nutrient trading – the buying and selling of nitrogen and phosphorus “credits” to offset new or increased pollution discharges – and what a Bay-wide nutrient trading program could mean for the health of the Chesapeake Bay. Our guest will be Scott Edwards, co-Director of the Food and Water Justice Project at Food and Water Watch.

We conclude this week’s Sound Bites by taking a look at the Delmarva peninsula with Tom Horton, Professor of Practice in Environmental Studies at Salisbury University who covered the environment for the Baltimore Sun for 35 years, and Bill Nelson, Lecturer in Environmental Studies at Salisbury University. They recently returned from a month-long kayak trip around Delmarva with a group of students from the university, and they join us to discuss the region’s length and breadth, its edges and interiors, and its people and critters.

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Temple Grandin’s ‘The Autistic Brain’

Temple GrandinJuly 5, 2013 – Hour 2

We rebroadcast our inspiring interview with the amazing Dr. Temple Grandin.  Author, professor of Animal Science at Colorado State University and a consultant on animal behavior to the livestock industry, Grandin talks about her latest book, The Autistic Brain: Thinking Across the Spectrum.

She will discuss the autistic spectrum, agriculture, different ways of thinking, and creativity.

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How Poverty Influences the Brain

July 1, 2013-Segment 2

brainsWe talk about a recent study out of the University of Pennsylvania that reveals how poverty can affect brain function. Our guests will be: Dr. Brian B. Avants, assistant professor of Radiology at Penn, who co-authored the study; Adanna Johnson-Evans, psychologist and owner of Ipako Wellness Counseling; and Dante Wilson, CEO and founder of Reclaiming Our Children and Community Project, Inc.

 

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Sound Bites: Farm Bill Fails | Obesity A Disease? | Shad Dwindling In MD | Recipe: Gluten-Free Strawberry Cupcakes

ShadJune 25, 2013 – Hour 2

On another live episode of Sound Bites we continue our discussion of the Farm Bill, which the House of Representatives failed to pass last week. Joining us will be: Patty Lovera, Assistant Director of Food & Water Watch, where she coordinates the Food Team; Justin King, Federal Policy Liaison of the Asset Building Program for the New America Foundation; and Robert L. Paarlberg, Betty Freyhof Johnson ’44 Professor of Political Science at Wellesley College and researcher on food and agricultural policy.

Last week the American Medical Association reclassified obesity as a disease. Michael Moss, Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter for The New York Times and author of Salt Sugar Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us, joins us to talk about the implications of that new classification.

Next, Baltimore Sun environmental reporter Tim Wheeler joins us to talk about the dwindling shad populations in Maryland.

We end this week’s episode with a seasonal recipe for gluten-free strawberry cupcakes, from The Baltimore Blend’s Carla Wills. Yumm!

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Climate Change In Our Backyards

JULIA KUMARI DRAPKIN

June 20, 2013 – Segment 2

We talk climate change and its personal implications with reporter Julia Kumari Drapkin, who is the lead producer for iSeeChange at KVNF, a public media experiment in community environmental science reporting.


DSM-5: Diagnosing Mental Illness

DSM-5

June 20, 2013 – Segment 1

We discuss the update of the tool used to diagnose mental illness and recommend treatment: the DSM-5, the fifth edition of the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Our guests include:
  • Richard Vatz, professor in the Department of Mass Communication and Communication Studies at Towson University;
  • Sharon Bisco, Adult Psychiatrist and Psychoanalyst in Private Practice;
  • and David Arnold, Chief of Psychiatry at Laurel Regional Hospital and Author of I Mind.

 

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Sound Bites: Does Report On Arsenic & Chicken Matter?; Monsanto Watch; And Langston Hughes’ “Freedom’s Plow”

monsanto-wheatJune 4, 2013 – Segment 4

We kick-off another live episode of Sound Bites with a debate over the Johns Hopkins University study on arsenicals in chicken and their longterm effects on our health. With: Patty Lovera, Assistant Director of Food & Water Watch; and Tom Super, Director of Communications for the National Chicken Council.

Then, we turn to Monsanto. Tom Laskawy, food and ag writer for Grist and Executive Director of the Food and Environment Reporting Network, will discuss a piece he wrote on new evidence suggesting Monsanto’s popular herbicide RoundUp might lead to adverse long-term health effects in people. Then Tom Philpott, food and ag blogger for MotherJones, talks about his recent articles on Monsanto’s ally in the State Department and their never-commercialized GM wheat that’s sprouting up in Oregon.

We close Sound Bites this week with Blain Snipstal, farm manager at Five Seeds Farm & Apiary, who will read a Langston Hughes poem that highlights the importance of African Americans in agriculture and farming.

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Sound Bites: Arsenic In Our Chicken; Supreme Court’s Monsanto Ruling; Bay Oysters; and Salt Sugar Fat

Michael Moss' Salt Sugar FatMay 22, 2013 – Hour 1

This week on Sound Bites, we begin with Dr. Keeve Nachman, Director of the Center for a Livable Future‘s Farming for the Future program, who joins us to talk about a scientific study he co-authored on arsenic in chicken feed.

Then, New York Times Supreme Court correspondent Adam Liptak discusses last week’s Supreme Court decision in which the court ruled unanimously in favor of Monsanto, stating that an Indiana farmer violated Monsanto’s patent on genetically modified soybeans when he culled some from a grain elevator and used them to replant his own crop in future years.

Next you hear from Tim Wheeler, reporter for B’more Green, the Baltimore Sun‘s environmental blog, who will discuss oyster restoration projects in the Chesapeake Bay.

We close out the first hour with Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Michael Moss, investigative reporter for the New York Times, who joins us to talk about his new book, Salt Sugar Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us.

**Due to technical circumstances, the podcast for this show is unavailable.**


Breast Cancer: Treatment Options, Genes, and Controversy

Angelina Jolie had a preventative double mastectomyMay 16, 2013 – Segment 1

We talk about both the praise and controversy over actress Angelina Jolie’s decision to have a preventative double mastectomy after testing positive for the BRCA1 gene, which indicated she would likely develop breast cancer in her lifetime. Joining us to discuss breast cancer treatment options are: Dr. Barron H. Lerner, medical historian in the Departments of Population Health and Medicine at the NYU Langone Medical Center and author of The Breast Cancer Wars; and Marsha Oakley, RN-BSN, Nursing Coordinator at the Hoffberger Breast Center at Mercy.

Then, we talk about the genes at the center of Angelina Jolie’s decision, genes that are patented and whose expensive diagnostic tests are inaccessible for many ordinary people. Joining us are: Ellen T. Matloff, CGC, Research Scientist in Genetics, and Director of Cancer Genetic Counseling at Yale; Emily Kuchinsky, Genetic Counselor at MedStar Franklin Square Medical Center; and Sandra Park, Senior Staff Attorney with the ACLU Women’s Rights Project.

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