The Marc Steiner Show

Archive for Iran

Debate: Nuclear Negotiations with Iran

iranMarch 12, 2015 – Segment 3

We take a look at the United States’ nuclear negotiations with Iran, with: James Phillips, Senior Research Fellow for Middle Eastern Affairs, Douglas and Sarah Allison Center for Foreign and National Security Policy, The Davis Institute for National Security and Foreign Policy at The Heritage Foundation; and Ali Gharib, independent journalist and contributor to The Nation.


A Sliver of Light: Three Americans Imprisoned in Iran

Shane Bauer, Sarah Shourd, and Josh Fattal

March 19, 2014 – Segment 4

We meet Shane Bauer, Sarah Shourd, and Josh Fattal. They were arrested along the border between Iraq and Iran in 2009. They were accused by the Iranian authorities of being spies, though no evidence was ever presented to support that claim. Sarah Shourd was released 14 months later, and Bauer and Fattal were released in September 2011.

The three hikers have just published a new book, A Sliver of Light: Three Americans Imprisoned in Iran, and will speak Saturday night at 7:30 at Red Emma’s, 30 W. North Avenue in Baltimore. For more information, visit redemmas.org.

LINK


Thoughts on the Iran Nuclear Deal

IranDecember 3, 2013 – Segment 3

We turn our attention to Iran, with Trita Parsi, President of the National Iranian American Council and author of A Single Roll of the Dice – Obama’s Diplomacy with Iran.

 

 

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International News Roundtable

iranSeptember 25, 2013 – Segment 2

We host an international news roundtable. We discuss the hostage situation in Nairobi, Kenya, the relationship between Kenya and Somalia, and US-Iranian relations. Our guests include: Sunni Khalid, veteran journalist and war reporter; Dr. Abdi Samatar, professor of Geography at University of Minnesota and President of the African Studies Association; James Phillips, Senior Research Fellow for Middle Eastern Affairs; and Phyllis Bennis, Director of the New Internationalism Project at the Institute for Policy Studies.

LINK


Syrian rebels and analysis of what the election of reformers means for Iran

June 17, 2013-Segment 3

SyriaandIranWe turn to international news with a discussion on the U.S. increasing support for Syrian rebels and analysis of what the election of reformers means for Iran. We were joined by:

  • Michael Curtis, Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Political Science at Rugters University;
  • James Paul, Author of Syria UnMasked;
  • Stephen Zunes, Professor of Politics and International Studies and Chair of Middle Eastern Studies at the University of San Francisco

 

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Philosophers’ Roundtable on Eurocentric Philosophies

February 11, 2013 – Hour 2

We will examine the critique that in the U.S. we focus on Eurocentric philosophies, and will feature philosophers who are working to change that reality.

Our roundtable panel includes:

  • Hamid Dabashi, Hagop Kevorkian Professor of Iranian Studies and Comparative Literature at Columbia University
  • Tsenay Serequeberhan, Professor in the Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies at Morgan State University
  • Desiree Melton, Associate Professor of Philosophy at College of Notre Dame of Maryland.

Shane Bauer On Solitary Confinement

February 7, 2013 – Segment 1

We sit down with Shane Bauer, an independent journalist based in Oakland who wrote an article about solitary confinement for Mother Jones titled “Solitary in Iran Nearly Broke Me. Then I Went Inside American Prisons.”

Bauer was one of three hikers detained by Iranian authorities at the Iraq-Iran border in 2009 and held for over two years, with four months in solitary confinement.

 

 

 

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March 7, 2012 – Segment 2

Iranian-American poet, journalist and writer Roya Hakakian joins us to share her perspective on Iran-U.S. relations.  Read more from Roya on tensions current and past between her two nations here.


March 6, 2012 – Hour 1

Today we asses the threat of military action against Iran.  We’re joined by: Reza Marashi, Research Director for the National Iranian American Council, and Michael Rubin, Resident Scholar at the American Enterprise Institute and former Pentagon Official .


January 10, 2012 – Segment 1

Join our panel as they discuss whether military intervention in Iran is imminent, and if it’s necessary.  Our guests are Reza Marashi, Research Director for the National Iranian American Council, Charles Faddis, retired CIA operations officer who served for twenty years in the Middle East, South Asia, and Southern Europe, and David Swanson, author of War is a Lie.


October 14, 2010 – Hour 2

What is life really like in Iran today? What is the Iranian political reality behind the rhetoric? Joining us this hour to answer these questions and more is Iranian-American Hooman Majd. His new book is The Ayatollah’s Democracy: An Iranian Challenge.


August 31, 2010 – Hour 2

How can we protect our privacy while still using increasingly ubiquitous devices like cell phones, GPS’s, and personal computers?

Ali Herischi and Edward Moawad, founding partners of Moawad & Herischi LLP, start off the show with a discussion of a case which highlights the tension between privacy and technology. They are representing Iranian journalist Isa Saharkhiz in his suit against Nokia Siemens Networks for allegedly releasing information to the Iranian government that let them use his cell phone for surveillance.

Then our panel takes on the everyday challenges of online security and privacy.
Zeynep Tufekci is Asistant Professor at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, and author of the blog Technosociology.
Sean Gallagher is a freelance technology journalist and Technology Editor of NBC Digital’s Tech Goes Strong.
Jay Stanley is Senior Policy Analyst for the ACLU’s Speech, Privacy and Technology Program


October 19, 2009 – Hour 1

Anthony McCarthy co-hosts with Marc today, and Cornel West joins us to discuss his new memoir, Brother West: Living and Loving Out Loud.

Then, with a decision of how many more troops the US will send to Afghanistan pending, we take a look at US foreign policy there.  Our guest is Phyllis Bennis, who is working on a book about the war in Afghanistan.  She’s also the author of Ending the Iraq War and Understanding the US-Iran Crisis, as well as the Director of the New Internationalism Project at the Institute for Policy Studies.


September 15, 2009 – Hour 1

Four our first hour, Marc talks with Dr. Haleh Esfandiari, an Iranian American academic and the director of the Middle East Program at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington DC.

In December 2006, Dr. Esfandiari was robbed at knifepoint on the way to the airport for a return flight to the US. The three men threated her life and stole all of her valuables, including her travel documentation. When she applied for new documents, she was forbidden to leave Iran and interrogated by authorities from the Iranian Ministry of Intellegence. In May 2007, she was detained in Iran’s Evin Prison, where she was kept in solitary confinement until August 21st.

Dr. Esfandiari talks about her experience and the amazing strength and discipline she demonstrated in surviving this unimaginable ordeal. Her book, My Prison, My Home: One Woman’s Story of Captivity in Iran was published by Harper Collins on September 1st.


June 22, 2009 – Hour 2

For the second hour of today’s show, Marc was joined by guests to discuss the current protests by Iranian citizens, and how the Internet and modern technology may be aiding these efforts.  Today’s panel included:


A First-Person Account From Iran

(WARNING: You may find the images of death and violence contained below disturbing.  Please do not scroll down if you do not wish to see them.)

I received this post from our colleague, William Kern, the Managing Editor of WORLDMEETS.US, last night, before the images hit the newspapers this morning.  It is part of this continuing dialogue with his friend and colleague in Iran.  Below is their very moving and telling conversation via Skype.

While the world of the web, Twitter and Facebook, may be driving this Iranian revolt in ways we could not imagine forty years ago, or even 5 years ago, it is part of a tradition that is much older and deeper.

In my lifetime it is connected to the 1956 revolt in Hungary against the Soviet Union’s domination of their nation.   The world watched in awe, but that is all we did was watch, as the Soviet troops and tanks mowed down the resistance fighters and crushed their revolution.  The same thing happened again in Prague, Czechoslovakia in 1968, when lovers of freedom stood up against the Soviets demanding freedom.   At that time it was part of a worldwide revolutionary movement for change that grew out of the civil rights and anti-war movements of the 1960’s here in America.   We had our own standoffs with the police and the establishment powers of our nation, which used its federal power through efforts like COINTELPRO to intimidate and murder those who stood against the war and racism.

In recent years, we have seen Tiananmen Square and the demonstrations in China in 1989, the bursts of Burmese resistance in 2007 against their own tyranny, and the Tibetans demanding freedom from the Chinese government.   We could see all these as defeats; I suppose in their immediate aftermath they felt like stunning losses.

Having been part of movements like this in my past I understand the intensity, passion and power of those moments.   How quickly events change around you.   How the spirit of resistance kept your spirits high enough to face any response.   Even when you knew the moment was lost, you could not back down to the might around you.

If the Iranian rebellion is crushed, it will not be a defeat.  It is a part of a continuum of resistance to tyranny and working to create a culture of justice and human rights in our world.   Every such powerful moment widens the cracks in the weakening walls of oppression.  It sows seeds for the power of change in generations to follow.

Already in Iran we are seeing deep divides, even within the ruling circles of the theocracy.  Who knows how all this will unfold in the days ahead?

The photograph and Skype dialogue below shows us the power of this moment.  The photo itself should sear itself into the consciousness of the world as a symbol of why we stand for freedom.

-marc

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June 15, 2009 – Hour 1

Today’s show started with a brief discussion with Senator Ben Cardin about today’s headlines, including Israeli’s Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s statement that he could accept a Palestinian state, and the future of the American health care system.
Then, we discussed the protests following the Iranian Presidential election with a panel of experts.
Our guests were:


Phyllis Bennis, Senior Fellow at the Institute for Policy Studies, a fellow at the Transnational Institute in Amsterdam, and a long time analyst, writer and activist around middle eastern issues.


Shiva Balaghi, a member of the editorial committee at the Middle East Report, Vice President of the American Institute of Iranian Studies, and author of Iran: Art Society and Revolution, Saddam Hussein: A Biography, and an upcoming book on modern Iranian cultural history.


William Kern, editor of Worldmeet.us, a website that publishes English translations of international news stories.


May 18, 2009 – Hour 2

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is in the United States to meet with President Barack Obama. Whether it is how to approach Iran, the question of a two state solution, or the issue of Jewish settlements in the West Bank, there are a lot of areas where the two leaders do not see eye to eye. Marc discussed the future of Israeli-U.S. relations and President Obama’s role in the Middle East peace process with Robert Freedman and Waleed Hazbun.

Robert Freedman is a professor of politcal science at Johns Hopkins University and the author of 4 books on Soviet foreign policy.  He is also the editor of 14 different books on Israel and the Middle East.

Waleed Hazbun is an assistant professor of politcal science at Johns Hopkins University and the Author of the book, Beaches, Ruins Resorts: The Politics of Tourism in the Arab World.


16 Arrested During Election Night Celebration in Charles Village

Here’s a letter that we received and wanted to share with everyone.  If anyone else would like to publicize first-hand information about the police misconduct in Charles Village on Election Night, or has other Election Night experiences they’d like to share, please post your comments here or email us at cem@centerforemergingmedia.org.

 

Marc,

During the night following the election, my roommates and I walked
down to 33rd and St. Paul and started celebrating the election of
Barack Obama. We quickly gained support of local students, and our
group of seven quickly grew to over 400. What was a beautifully
patriotic evening, filled with unity and gentle celebration, quickly
turned into fear and chaos as the Baltimore Police Department randomly
(and illegally) assaulted, intimidated, and arrested many members of a
peaceful crowd.

Last Spring, President Ungar invited you to speak at Goucher to a
group of Goucher students, faculty, and staff. President Ungar
personally invited me at the last moment, claiming it was essential
that I hear you speak. Your discussion inspired me to want to get more
involved with our city, and this semester several of my friends and I
moved down to Charles Village from Towson, in order to become true
Baltimoreans.

On November 4, the six of us – all sophomores at Goucher, voted
for the first time. Sending in my absentee ballot to my native
California was one of the most exciting things I have ever done, and
we were all excited to partake in making history. Just a month before
hearing you speak at Goucher, I had the opportunity to shake now
President-elect Obama’s hand at an election rally in Wilmington. I
took the train up to Wilmington by myself, and I instantly befriended
a group of students from the University of Delaware. The feeling of
unity was overwhelming, and I instantly knew this campaign was unlike
anything else in history.

The night of Nov. 4th was no exception. My roommates and I had to get
outside to celebrate. People joined quickly and we were suddenly
flanked by members of the community, students from several
institutions, schoolteachers, and professors – all united and chanting
"USA! USA!". The Hopkins Campus Security respected the crowd and kept
it under control, and it became a truly beautiful event. I was
surrounded by people I had never met before, of all colors: black and
white, Muslim and Jewish, old and young, from near and far all
celebrating under American flags.

You have already heard about what the police did last night. They
arrested two of my roommates and another one of my friends, for
reasons that were never disclosed. I stood and watched while my
roommate, a 19-year-old girl from New Jersey, was grabbed by the
throat by two policemen twice her size and had her arms bound so
tightly behind her back, she was screaming in agony.

I have talked with Goucher President Sanford Ungar, and he has already tried to help us get our
voice heard. The fact is that this happens every night in this city,
without a single mention in the Sun  or on the local TV news. These
students and the professor that were arrested were never told their
rights and were fingerprinted, photographed, intimidated, and forced
to spend hours in cells with people charged with violent crimes.
Fortunately, my friends and the rest of these aforementioned sixteen
that were arrested are lucky enough to be backed up by institutions
like Goucher College and Johns Hopkins University.

I know this letter is far from brief, and I appreciate that you have
taken the time to read this. I was inspired by your discussion at
Goucher, and wanted to know what I could do to change something in
this city. I think Baltimore is a beautiful place buried in an
inconceivable amount of filth. Before election day I couldn’t fathom
how I could help, or what I could even help with. I now know the
intricacies of how the Baltimore Police Department detains citizens
without Mirandizing them, charging them, or respecting their basic
freedoms. I feel I can speak on behalf of everyone who witnessed
Tuesday night’s atrocities when I say that we want to help.

The sixteen people arrested last night were picked randomly. It could
have been anyone. I have spoken with and know personally several of
those arrested and can tell you that they were all respectable and
respectful citizens that have done so much already to make this city a
better place. Will these volunteers, public school teachers, artists,
and professors voices be drowned out?

I hope not.

Thank you again for speaking to us at Goucher. Baltimore needs you,
and is lucky to have you.

Thank you,

Nick Bourland
Goucher College class of 2011


Richard Vatz reviews Sarah Palin’s Speech

From RedMaryland.Blogspot.com:

All I can say is “wow.” And when John McCain ascended the stage after Governor Palin’s speech, he said “wow” too.

What an amazingly auspicious speech for an aspiring Vice President candidate to give. In the Geraldine Ferraro era, all of the rhetoric of a major female candidate had a defensive cast. This speech was a confident, aggressive speech by a female candidate for Vice President who knows what she thinks and knows from what values her assertions come.

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A little lead up, if I may – if I must. Governor Mitt Romney’s speech and Governor Mike Huckabee’s speeches were not bad, although I must say Gov. Huckabee is an acquired taste. Gov. Romney said Washington has changed, and the real change would be a move to conservatism. He also rang some good notes on the Democrats’ love of dependency and aversion to seeing evil when it occurs. Gov. Huckabee took some good shots at the effete quality of Senator Barack Obama and added an effective allegory involving soldiers who teach children what it means to earn something.

Now to the Republican Rhetorical A-team. Rudy Giuliani is a brilliantly convincing and persuasive speaker, and one feared that he would be so compelling that Gov. Palin would pale (no pun intended) by comparison. He emphasized all of the right matters: that Governors as executives must make decisions, while senators are all persuasion with little or no real-world reality testing. He hit on the “surge” issue, as almost all Republican convention speakers have done, with the notation that Democrats in the one visible test of leadership in the past 2 years failed on the decision, failed on the follow-up, and failed to recognize the surge’s success. Sen. Giuliani emphasized Sen. Obama’s contrasting indecision and took a neat shot at one of Majority Leader Harry Reid’s irresponsible remarks, “This war is lost.” If the Republicans ever run out of Reidian dumb mots, they need new and better researchers.

Sarah Palin not only hit her speech out of the park, but she first went through the Democrats’ mitts. Women should be proud that their first presidential or vice-presidential candidate had all of the strength and aggressiveness-without-offensiveness required of candidates for the vice presidency. Gov. Palin was consistent in her praise, but never in awe, of Senator McCain. His impressive war biography, best articulated by Sen. Fred Thompson last night, was mentioned by all speakers tonight.

Gov. Palin’s attacks on Barack Obama were all fair game, in acceptable political taste, some with great humor – and \telling\. She said that while her former job as Mayor was derided by some Democrats, it was sort of like being a “community organizer” (Obaman claim to fame) , but with “actual responsibilities.” This line of argument had several iterations, and she also detailed the devastating list of liberal values that would undermine a president who put America first: negotiating with Iran, terrorists, and ignoring our need to “drill now.”

She used her own Reidism, “I can’t stand John McCain,” to further promote her presidential nominee. Thank God Reid is the poison well that never stops giving.

Gov. Palin detailed her own willingness to curtail financial corruption, whatever the party that commits it. Her prioritizing of honesty and integrity in government came through loud and clear. Her fluency in discussing energy policy was reassuring. The only thing lacking in her speech was evidence of sophistication in dealing with Islamic radicalism, resurgent Russian imperialism, and the complex challenges of China.

I usually rank elocution as the least important variable in a speech, but Gov. Palin’s had to be exquisite, and it was. Surely, the outcome of this powerful, moving address was to erase doubts regarding her viability from many low intensity supporters on the right and on the left.

Richard Vatz is professor of Political Rhetoric at Towson University
rvatz@towson.edu


12/17-12/21 HOLIDAY MUSIC

Time for our annual Holiday Music week.  Here is what is coming up!

Monday, December 17th

12-1 pm Lea Gilmore shares her favorite music.  Want to check out some of what she played?  Here is the playlist.

  • Baby, It’s Cold Outside, performed by Eric Byrd and Lea Gilmore
  • Santa’s Got the Blies, by Denise Lasalle
  • Please Come Home for Christmas, by Charles Brown
  • Santa Baby, by Eartha Kitt
  • All I Want for Christmas is You, by Mariah Carey
  • This Christmas, by Donny Hathaway
  • Give Love on Christmas Day, by the Jackson 5
  • So This is Christmas, by John Lennon
  • Mary Did You Know, by Clay Aiken
  • I am Not Forgotten, by Israel and New Breed
  • Hark the Herald Angels Sing, by Norman Hitchens
  • Silent Night, by Mahalia Jackson
  • What a Wonderful World, by Louis Armstrong

1-2 pm, Tom Hall shares from of his favorite music.

  • Oh Come, All Ye Faithful
  • Come Colors Rise
  • Thank you, by Dave Brubeck
  • Gabriel’s Message
  • Yvette in English, by Joni Mitchell
  • I Wish You Love
  • It Came Upon a Midnight Clear
  • Never Will I Marry
  • Nine Crimes, Damien Rice
  • Didn’t My Lord Deliver Daniel
  • Hallelujah Chorus

Tuesday December 18th

12-1 pm Jon Carney is the Concertmaster of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and he brought some of his favorite classical music for us.  What did he play?

  • Edward Elgar conducting the London Symphony- 1st movement of violin concerto featuring Yehudi Menuhin at age 16 – 1931
  • Vivaldi – Largo from “Winter” of the Quattro Stagioni, Jon’s recording w/ the Royal Philharmonic – 1992
  • Camille St. Saens – from his “organ” symphony (#3) – Jean Martinon and French Radio Symphony – 1975
  • Michael Nyman – Prospero’s Books (miranda) – 1996
  • Beethoven – slow movement from his opus 135 String Quartet – Guarneri Quartet 1987
  • Bartok – Concerto for Orchestra – last movement – RPO w/ Danielle Gatti – 1997
  • Bach – Chaconne for Partita #2 in D minor for solo violin – Henryk Szerying
  • Fritz Kreisler – “La Gitana” for violin and piano – Jon’s own recording w/ his mother on piano – 1995
  • closing music: Michael Nyman – Quartet #4 – track 14

1-2 pm Jason Willett is the co-owner of the True Vine Record store in Hampden, as well as a member of a litany of fine bands including Leprechaun Catering and Half Japanese.  We asked him to bring his favorite Christmas music, and this is what we heard – not quite in the order we heard them, go figure –

  • James Brown – Santa Claus, Go Straight to the Ghetto
  • Culturcide – Depressed Christmas
  • Frieder Butzmann – White Christmas
  • Hybrid Kids – Good King Wenceslaus
  • James White and the Blacks – Christmas With Satan
  • The Jethros – I’m Dreaming of a Wide Christmas
  • Rotary Connection – Opening & Silent Night Chant
  • finally, 3 awesome song poems called Snowbows, Santa Came on a Nuclear Missile, and Santa Goes Modern

Wednesday, December 19th

12-1 pm Keith Covington is the owner of the New Haven Lounge, one of the best places around to see live jazz.  He brought us the gift of great holiday jazz music; here they are in order:

  • Slim & The Supreme Angels – Precious Lord
  • Selah Jubilee Singers – When Was Jesus Born
  • Kenny Burrel – Merry Christmas Baby
  • Ramsey Lewis – Christmas Blues
  • David Benoit – Christmas is Coming
  • Ramsey Lewis – Merry Christmas Baby
  • Chris Botti – Ave Maria
  • Dianne Reeves – Carol of the Bells
  • The Swan Silvertones – I’m Not Tired Yet
  • Ramsey Lewis – God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen
  • Bobby Durham – Jingle Bells
  • Van Morrison – Have I Told You Lately?
  • The Original Five Blind Boys of Alabama (not to be confused with the Unoriginal Five Blind Boys of Alabama, seriously they’re better) -This May Be the Last Time

1-2 pm Rock and Roll has had something to say about Christmas since the 50’s.  Former disc jockeys Toby Bray and Michael Butscher came by and spun the following tunes.

  • Do They Know It’s Christmas? – Band Aid
  • Father Christmas – The Kinks
  • Wonderful Christmas Time – Paul McCartney
  • Step Into Christmas – Elton John
  • Happy Christmas (War Is Over) – John Lennon
  • Santa Claus Is Coming to Town – Chicago
  • White Christmas – America
  • The Christmas Song – Linda Ronstadt
  • The First Noel – Air Supply
  • Merry Christmas, Baby – Southern Culture on the Skids
  • Merry Christmas – The Ramones
  • Christmas Wrapping – The Waitresses
  • Blue Christmas – Elvis Presley
  • Please Come Home for Christmas – The Eagles
  • River – Joni Mitchell
  • Santa Claus is Coming to Town – Bruce Springsteen
  • Little Drummer Boy – Bing Crosby & David Bowie
  • Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas – Shawn Colvin
  • The Christmas Song – Nat “King” Cole
  • Jingle Bells – Frank Sinatra
  • Let It Snow – Dean Martin
  • It’s Beginning to Look A Lot Like Christmas – Perry Como
  • Santa Claus is Coming to Town – The Jackson Five
  • Christmas Isn’t Christmas (Without the One You Love) – The O’Jays
  • This Christmas – Donny Hathaway
  • L’il Saint Nick – The Beach Boys

Thursday, December 20th

12-1 pm Ed Polochick is a busy guy.  He’s conductor of the Lincoln Symphony Orchestra in Nebraska, Artistic Director of the Choral Artists of Baltimore, and Director of Choral Activities at the Peabody Conservatory.  He was good enough to find time to come in and share his favorite classical and choral Christmas Music.

  • The First Noel, from the album Crystal Carols by Dean Shostak
  • The Holy Boy by John Ireland, from the album A Christmas Garland
  • Adeste Fideles, by Liszt, performed by Walker Marshall
  • Many Moods of Christmas, Suite 2, by Robert Shaw, from the album Festival of Carols
  • Candlelight Carol, from the album Christmas Night: Carols of the Nativity, conducted by John Rutter
  • Christmas Night, Christmas Night: Carols of the Nativity, conducted by John Rutter
  • Many Moods of Christmas, Suite 3, by Robert Shaw, from the album Festival of Carols
  • Hallelujah Chorus from Handel’s Messiah, performed by the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and Concert Artists Symphonic Chorale
  • Worthy is the Lamb That Was Slain performed by the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and Concert Artists Symphonic Chorale

1-2 pm Hopefully you’ll have some time to relax during the holidays.  And if you do, maybe you’ll want to go to the movies…but what to see?  Never fear, we’ve brought together a great panel of film critics to tell you what to see.  We’ll talk to Violet Glaze of the Baltimore City Paper, Mike Speir from Variety, and Michael Sragrow from the Baltimore Sun.

We really hope you enjoy all of this music and special programming.  Happy Holidays!

-Jessica, Justin, Marcus


10/16/07 Congressional Representatives

Today at noon we are talking with 1/2 of Maryland’s representation in the House.  We’ll hear from Chris Van Hollen, Elijah Cummings, Wayne Gilchrist, and John Sarbanes.  Topics?  Iraq, SCHIP, Iran, veterans issues, and whatever you choose to bring to the table!

-Jessica


07/23/07 Iraq, Iran, and Gee’s Bend

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First off today, Iraqi-born, Maryland-residing professor Adil Shamoo joins us to discuss where he would like to see US foreign policy in Iraq go from here.  Here’s his July 16 editorial from The Sun: “America Should Leave Iraq, But For the Right Reasons.”

Then, we’ll hear about the long history of struggle for democracy within Iran.  Our guests are Janet Afary and Kevin B. Anderson.  They are husband and wife, and co-authors of both the book Foucault and The Iranian Revolution: Gender and The Seductions of Islamism and the recent article in The Nation magazine “The Iranian Impasse.”

Lastly, anyone been to The Walters Museum lately and seen The Gee’s Bend exhibit?  Tune in to hear an interview with Louisiana Bendolph and Mary Lee Bendolph, two of the quilters from Gee’s Bend, as well as Linda Day Clark, whose photographs from Gee’s Bend make up an accompanying exhibit.

-Justin

 


06/25/07 1pm Camelia Entekhabifard

camelia.gif

Finished reading the articles for noon and looking for something else to read over the weekend?  Read the book that we’ll be discussing in the second hour on Monday with author Camelia Entekhabifard.  It’s called Camelia: Save Yourself By Telling the Truth, A Memoir of Iran. 

Camelia was born and raised in Tehran.  She has a pretty incredible story about being imprisoned there for her work as a journalist, and charming her way into an opportunity to flee the country after some horrible months in solitary confinement.

Now she lives in New York City and continues her work as a journalist around the world.  Just not in Iran.

-Justin


06/14/07 1 pm Watching America

Tomorrow, get ready for an hour talking about planning for the influx of people coming into Maryland because of Base Realingment and Closure with Lietenaunt Governor Anthony Brown.

Scratch that. Elected officials are busy, and when your boss is the Governor and asks you to clear your schedule to come to a meeting, you listen! No harm, no foul. We’re working to schedule another date soon. Good thing we had a special super secret show in the works!!

watching-america-begin-copy.jpg

WatchingAmerica.com is a website I try and check on a daily basis. It’s a place where you can read articles from the foreign press about America. The people who run the website have dozens of articles translated each day from the Middle East, Europe, Africa, Russia, China, and more. In conversations with the founder of the website, William Kern, we thought that Watching America could translate into a radio special, too. So tomorrow we are putting some hurt on the phone bill at WYPR (which reminds me…are you a member yet?) and talking to foreign journalists around the world.

We’ll talk to:

  • Ahmad Khalidi, a co-editor of Mideast Mirror, a London-based daily, as well as the Editor-in-Chief of the quarterly Journal of Palestine Studies.
  • William Waack, a newscaster for O Globo, Brazil. He’s spent multiple decades as a reporter, editor, and international correspondent for the Brazillian Press.
  • Andrei Sitov, the Washington Bureau Chied for the Itar-Tass news agency of Russia.
  • and Hugh Williamson, the Berlin correspondent for the Financial Times since 2001.

We’ll be talking with them about how America is viewed by their audience and in their countries. What does the world think of our domestic debates over immigration? What does the world think of our scandals (federal prosecutor firings, Plamegate, etc.) Watchingamerica.com shows the foreign press writing about topics such as tensions between Iran and the U.S. (understandable; has consequences for the entire world) and Paris Hilton’s trip to, and from, and back to jail (less understandable; of course I care, and desperately, but why do they?)

Enjoy the show. It will be the first of many such programs on Watching America.

-Jessica

 I’m going to jump in here with a few quick words about this hour’s show.  I just came out of the studio, where we recorded the interview that will be played at 1pm.  The conversation never came around to Paris Hilton or any of the recent political scandals, but it did cover a lot of very interesting ground.  To find out the details, you’ll have to listen.  If you don’t catch it at 1pm, just go to http://www.wypr.org/M_Steiner.html.  We’ll have the audio up there as soon as possible.

We taped the show in advance in case we had any trouble with all of the international phone connections, and to better coordinate with schedules in so many time zones.  Since we won’t be taking calls as it airs, we’re really looking forward to some feedback right here!

-Justin