The Marc Steiner Show

Archive for race

The Black Panther: Academic and Visceral Readings Cont’d

March 8, 2018 – The Black Panther Cont’d

Listen in to the second episode of our series examining the world brought to us by — and cultural shift created by — The Black Panther movie. We delve deeper into the film’s complexity in a lively, humorous, and analytical discussion. With: Johns Hopkins History Professor Dr. Nathan Connolly; UMBC American Studies Professor Dr. Kimberly Moffitt; and Kalima Young, Lecturer in Electronic Media and Film at Towson University.

Enjoy our latest journey to the world that brought us Wakanda.


From The Archives: A Different World

A Different World (Credit: Wikipedia)March 14, 2017 – Segment 2

We hosted a special archive edition of The Marc Steiner Show, our 2013 commemoration of the 20th anniversary of “A Different World,” a groundbreaking television show that challenged stereotypes about race.

With: Eric Deggans, author of Race Baitor: How the Media Wields Dangerous Words to Divide a NationCarla Wills, Senior News Producer at Democracy Now!, and Bobby Marvin Holmes, Founder of Son of a Dream, LLC and co-Director of Live Young Blood, a documentary covering Baltimore’s struggle to reduce gun violence.


Race and Class Politics in the National Election

Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders will face off on Sunday at the next Democratic debate, moderated by CNN in Flint, Michigan.

March 8, 2016 – Segment 3

Marc discusses race and class politics in the national election. With: Dr. Lester Spence, Center for Emerging Media Scholar-In-Residence, Associate Professor of Political Science and Africana Studies at Johns Hopkins University, and author of Knocking the Hustle: Against the Neoliberal Turn in Black Politics; and Edward Wyckoff Williams, television producer, correspondent and writer living in New York City.

National News Roundup: Election 2016 & Beyond

Senator Bernie Sanders, an independent from Vermont and 2016 Democratic presidential candidate, speaks during a Liberty University Convocation in Lynchburg, Virginia, U.S., on Monday, Sept. 14, 2015. Sanders now leads his Democratic rival former secretary of state Hillary Clinton by double digits in Iowa and New Hampshire, the first two states in where votes will be cast in 2016 to decide the party's presidential nominee. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg *** Local Caption *** Bernie Sanders

February 29, 2016 – Segment 2

Marc hosts a National News Roundup on the 2016 Election and beyond with: Catalina Byrd, media consultant and political strategist; Lenny McAllister, Republican strategist, former congressional candidate, and host of NightTalk: Get To The Point on the Pittsburgh cable news channel and Get Right with Lenny McAllister on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA in Pittsburgh; and Bhaskar Sunkara, Founding Editor of Jacobin and a Senior Editor at In These Times.


Fracture: Barack Obama, the Clintons, and the Racial Divide

joy ann reidFebruary 4, 2016 – Segment 1

We speak with Joy-Ann Reid at the Enoch Pratt Free Library, about her book Fracture: Barack Obama, the Clintons, and the Racial Divide. Reid is a national correspondent for MSNBC.

Verdict In The Trial Of Officer Porter: Mistrial

william porterDecember 17, 2015 – Segment 1

Today we begin with a panel discussion on the mistrial declared in the trial of Officer William Porter in the death of Freddie Gray.

Our panel of guests include Dominque Stevenson, Program Director for the American Friends Service Committee and co-author with Eddie Conway of Marshall Law: The Life and Times of a Baltimore Black Panther;  Eddie Conway, producer at Real News NetworkMichaela Duchess Brown, head of communications for Bmore Bloc and Doug Colbert,  Professor at University of Maryland School of Law.


News Roundup: If You Were On The Jury, Would You Convict Officer William Porter?

bcpnews-after-hearing-contrasting-styles-of-closing-arguments-jury-begins-deliberations-in-porter-trial-20151214December 15, 2015 – Segment 1

Today we discuss closing statements in the trial of William Porter and the death of Freddie Gray and now it’s up to the jury. Our panel will reflect on the trial and its implications. They examine a number of issues, including jury instructions and how difficult it might be for the jury to convict Officer Porter. Joining us is Lisa Gray, Assistant Director of Student Life for Cultural and Spiritual Diversity at University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC); Eugene Craig III, grassroots activist and 3rd Vice-Chair of the Maryland Republican State Party; and Charles Ellison, political strategist and Host of The Ellison Report on WEAA.


Baltimore Traces: Communities in Transition – Part 4: Tensions

download bromoDecember 10, 2015 – Segment 1

We begin the day with the fourth segment of a series of productions by students in the American Studies Program at University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC), called Baltimore Traces: Communities in Transition. This segment is called Tensions.

 


Urbanite Magazine Special Edition: Truth, Reconciliation & Baltimore

IMG_0393-webNovember 10, 2015 – Segment 2

We host a panel of contributing writers to a special edition of the local publication, Urbanite Magazine’s Baltimore Uprising Edition, with Lawrence Lanahan, freelance journalist; Dave Duddley, co-Editor of the Urbanite; Dr. Helena Hicks, retired state employee and college professor; and Olu Butterfly of www.thisflywomanswork.com, homeschooling vegetarian “artrepreneur,” poet, and part of Afrikan Youth Alchemy, Dew More Baltimore, and Organic Soul.


Dozens of Activists Occupy Baltimore City Hall Overnight

October 15, 2015 – Segment 1

Our show begins with an update of the events that unfolded last night after local activists occupied Baltimore’s City Hall following the confirmation hearing of newly appointed police commissioner, Kevin Davis. We are also updated on the status of those peaceful protesters who were arrested early this morning.   Guest host, Karsonya “Dr. Kaye” Wise Whitehead speaks with Dayvon Love, Director of Research and Public Policy for leaders of a Beautiful Struggle.

 


Tamir Rice, Police Accountability & the Freddie Gray Trials

www.flickr.com creative commonsOctober 14, 2015 – Segment 2

Today we look at the Cleveland investigations into the fatal police shooting of 12-year old Tamir Rice which concluded that a Cleveland police officer’s actions were “reasonable,” a conclusion that has spurred wide national outrage with: A. Dwight Pettit, Baltimore defense attorney who has represented clients in police misconduct cases; Tre Murphy, Organizer with Baltimore Algebra Project and Baltimore Bloc; and Kimberly Kindy, government accountability reporter for The Washington Post.


Parenting In The 21st Century: From School Violence to Stereotyping

(family photo) ; www. daretobeking.netOctober 8, 2015 – Segment 1

Our guest host is Dr. Karsonya “Kaye” Whitehead, Assistant Professor of Communication and Affiliate Assistant Professor of African and African American Studies at Loyola University Maryland, and author of Notes From a Colored Girl: The Civil War Pocket Diaries of Emile Frances Davis and My Black Sons: Raising Boys in a Post-Racial America.

Dr. Whitehead will moderate a parenting roundtable with: David Miller, writer and creator of Dare to be King, LLC; and Isaiah Buchanan, Social Studies teacher at the Gilman School. We will cover recent topics in the news such as the Muslim student arrested for bringing a clock to school, a high school student being nearly beaten to death while other students captured it on video and a middle school student suspended for being involved in a staring contest with a White student.


Returning To Art-Part’heid: Disparities in Baltimore’s Art Scene

Station North Arts and Entertainment DistrictOctober 1, 2015 – Segment 1

Dr. Kimberly Moffitt moderates a discussion on Art-Part’heid: Continuing The Conversation On Disparities in Baltimore’s Art Scene. The panel of guests will include: Sheila Gaskins, performance artist, poet, stand up comic, and Director of Theater Action Group; Nia Hampton, writer and filmmaker who wrote an Op-Alt in this week’s City Paper titled “Somos Todos Iguais” about her experiences watching the Baltimore Uprising as a Baltimorean in Brazil; and Mia Loving, Curator and Founder of Invisible Majority, a creative community incubator.


Talking About Race: Media Bias and Black Communities

via http://www.audaciousideas.org/2015/09/media-bias-in-black-communities/September 29, 2015 – Segment 2

We host a discussion on media bias and Black communities, with: Dr. Kimberly Moffitt, Associate Professor of American Studies at University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) and co-editor of Blackberries and Redbones: Critical Articulations of Black Hair/Body Politics in Africana Communities; Rashad Robinson, Executive Director of Color Of Change, the nation’s largest online civil rights organization; and Stacey Patton, reporter for The Chronicle of Higher Education.

You can see Robinson and Patton tonight at the Enoch Pratt Free Library as part of the Open Society Institute-Baltimore series “Talking About Race.” For more information, click here.


Parenting: Talking To Your Children About Race

blmApril 13, 2015 – Segment 2

This week is the Spring Membership Drive for WEAA, and we have a lineup of great programs and great premiums! Please call into our show this week between 10 AM and noon eastern to make a pledge–410.319.8888, or pledge online here.

Our panel speaks about parenting and talking to children about race. The guests are: Dr. Karsonya “Kaye” Whitehead, Assistant Professor of Communication and Affiliate Assistant Professor of African and African American Studies at Loyola University Maryland and author of Letters to My Black Sons: Raising Boys in a Post-Racial AmericaDr. Roni Ellington, Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at Morgan State University; and Dr. Tara Mundell, mental health specialist, clinical psychologist and author of Let’s Talk About It, a book for children aimed at inspiring young, brilliant minds to build their self-esteem and confidence.


Philosophers’ Roundtable: Race & Class In The United States

protestApril 6, 2015 – Segment 2

We host a discussion about race and class in the U.S. with Dr. Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, Assistant Professor in Princeton University’s Center for African American Studies; and A. Adar Ayira, Project Manager of the More in the Middle Campaign for Associated Black Charities and facilitator and analyst at Baltimore Racial Justice Action, a program of Fusion Partnerships.


Baltimore’s Race Problems: Part 2

fergMarch 18, 2015 – Segment 2

We continue our discussion on the topic of race and racism in Baltimore, focusing on practical solutions. Our panel of guests includes: Dr. Roni Ellington, Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at Morgan State University; Roberto Alejandro, reporter for Baltimore’s Afro-American newspaper; Dr. Lawrence Brown, public health consultant and Assistant Professor of Public Health in the School of Community Health and Policy at Morgan State University; Michael Scott, Chief Equity Officer/President/Co-Founder of Equity Matters; and Dr. Tara Bynum, Assistant Professor in the Department of English at Towson University.


Baltimore’s Race Problems: Part 1

battsMarch 17, 2015 – Segment 2

Do you think Baltimore has a race problem? An article in the Baltimore Sun this past weekend indicates that Baltimore leaders agree: City has a race problemWe discuss it with: Dr. Lawrence Brown, public health consultant and Assistant Professor of Public Health in the School of Community Health and Policy at Morgan State University; community activist Kim Trueheart; Michael Eugene Johnson, Executive Director of the Paul Robeson Institute for Social Change; and Roberto Alejandro, reporter for Baltimore’s Afro-American newspaper.


Roland Park: One Of America’s First Garden Suburbs, And Built For Whites Only

Roland Park in BaltimoreFebruary 19, 2015 – Segment 3

Dr. Lawrence Brown, activist, public health consultant, and Assistant Professor of Public Health in the School of Community Health and Policy at Morgan State University, sits in for Marc.

We look at a piece of Baltimore’s history as a segregated city as we examine the Roland Park neighborhood. Our guest is Elizabeth Evitts Dickinson, who wrote an article in the Fall 2014 issue of Johns Hopkins Magazine, Roland Park: one of America’s first garden suburbs, and built for whites only. Dickinson has written about architecture, design, and urbanism for national publications for nearly 20 years. Her articles and essays have been published in The New York TimesThe New York Times Magazine, and The Atlantic Magazine’s CityLab, among manyothers. She is a contributing editor with Architect magazine, teaches writing at the Maryland Institute College of Art, and was the former editor of Urbanite magazine in Baltimore.


Art-Part’heid: Bridging the Gap of Disparities in the Baltimore Art Scene

Station North Arts and Entertainment DistrictJanuary 29, 2015 – Segment 4

We discuss an important event this Sunday at the 2640 Space: Art-Part’heid: Bridging the Gap of Disparities in the Baltimore Art Scene, a panel discussion and community dialogue on race, power, privilege, exclusion and shared wealth.

With: Mia Loving Curator and Founder of Invisible Majority, a creative community incubator; Michelle Gomez, independent curator who works collaboratively with under-represented audiences on community-focused exhibitions in Baltimore; Sophia Mak, artist, dancer, performer, educator, activist, and Program Manager at 901 Arts, a youth community arts organization; and Abdu Ali, musician and writer.


Annie For Target: Race & Representation in Film & Advertising

Annie for TargetJanuary 8, 2015 – Segment 2

Have you been to the movies lately? Join in our discussion on race and representation in film and advertising. We will take a look at recent movies including Exodus, Top Five and Annie, at Target ads, and at the rumors of Idris Elba as the next James Bond.

With: Dr. Kimberly Moffitt, Associate Professor of American Studies at UMBC and co-Editor of Blackberries and Redbones: Critical Articulations of Black Hair/Body Politics in Africana Communities; and Dr. Ray Winbush, Director of the Institute for Urban Research at Morgan State University.

 


Philosophers’ Roundtable: Predictions About The Political, Cultural & Social Changes Of 2015

FERGUSON, MO - AUGUST 12:  Demonstrators protest the killing of teenager Michael Brown on August 12, 2014 in Ferguson, Missouri. Brown was shot and killed by a police officer on Saturday in the St. Louis suburb of Ferguson. Ferguson has experienced two days of violent protests since the killing but, tonight's protest was peaceful.  (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)January 5, 2015 – Segment 4

We will host our first Philosophers’ Roundtable of 2015. Our panel of guests includes: Dr. Lester Spence, Associate Professor of Political Science and Africana Studies at Johns Hopkins University, Center for Emerging Media Scholar-in-Residence, and author of Stare in the Darkness: The Limits of Hip-Hop and Black Politics; Dr. Desiree Melton, Associate Professor of Philosophy at Notre Dame of Maryland University; and Dr. Joe Pettit, Associate Professor of Philosophy and Religious Studies Advisor at Morgan State University.

 


From The Archives: The White Women Of The Harlem Renaissance

Miss Anne in HarlemJanuary 2, 2015 – Segment 1

We talk with author Carla Kaplan, Davis Distinguished Professor of American Literature at Northeastern University, about her book Miss Anne in Harlem: The White Women of the Black Renaissance, which focuses on a small group of white women who crossed the color line and played controversial yet significant roles in the Harlem Renaissance.

This segment originally aired November 4, 2013.


The Whiteness Project: Exploring How White Americans Experience Their Ethnicity

The Whiteness ProjectOctober 30, 2014 – Segment 3

We take a look at The Whiteness Project, an interactive investigation into how Americans who identify themselves as “white” experience their ethnicity.

We talk with Whitney Dow, Founder of Two Tone Productions and Director/Producer ofThe Whiteness ProjectMarco Williams, Associate Arts Professor at the Kanbar Institute of Film & Television, Tisch School of the Arts, New York University; A. Adar Ayira, project manager of the More in the Middle Campaign for Associated Black Charities and facilitator and analyst at Baltimore Racial Justice Action, a program of Fusion Partnerships; and Sarah Tooley, member of Baltimore Racial Justice Action.


Racial Divides in Baltimore’s Art World

siloOctober 20, 2014 – Segment 3

We host a panel on the racial divides in the artistic world in Baltimore, inspired by articles in last week’s Baltimore City Paper‘s 2014 Fall Arts Guide. With: Kalima Young, Director of the Baltimore Art + Justice Project, a project of the Office of Community Engagement at MICA; Baynard Woods, Senior Editor for the Baltimore City Paper; Deana Haggag, Director of The Contemporary Museum in Baltimore; and Mia Loving, community organizer, entrepreneur, mother and wife.

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Latin@s and Ferguson

solidarityAugust 22, 2014 – Segment 5

We discuss how Latin@s are viewing the uprising and police repression in Ferguson with Marisa Franco, Leader of the National Day Laborer Organizing Network’s Not One More Campaign.

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Where Is America One Year After George Zimmerman’s Acquittal?

Family of Trayvon MartinJuly 15, 2014 – Segment 3

We reflect upon the acquittal of George Zimmerman in the killing of Trayvon Martin, a verdict which was handed down a year ago this week. With: Edward Wyckoff Williams, Contributing Editor at The Root and Political Contributor and Special Correspondent with AlJazeera America; and Dr. Raymond Winbush, Director of the Institute for Urban Research at Morgan State University.

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World Of The Play: Race And Representation

vera starkMay 2, 2014 – Segment 4

We hear an illuminating discussion that took place last Saturday at Everyman Theatre as part of their World of the Play series. The topic was Race and Representation: “Our greatest accomplishment. Our greatest shame.” Our exceptional panel of guests shared their commentaries on race, theatre, and film, drawing from the current production at Everyman, By the Way, Meet Vera Stark by Lynn Nottage. You will hear from: playwright and dramaturg Jacqueline Lawton, who was named one of the top 30 of the nation’s leading black playwrights by Arena Stage’s American Voices New Play Institute; Dr. Kimberly Moffitt, professor of American Studies at UMBC and author of Blackberries and Redbones: Critical Articulations of Black Hair/Body Politics in Africana Communities; and Otis Cortez Ramsey-Zoe, Lecturer of Theatre Arts at Howard University and Associate Artistic Director at banished? productions.

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Reactions to “Baltimore City, You’re Breaking My Heart”: Crime, Race, Class and Neighborhoods

Batimore, Maryland Row HousesFebruary 12, 2014 – Segment 3

We look at an article that appeared in Monday’s Baltimore Post-Examiner, titled “Baltimore City, You’re Breaking My Heart: This is why people leave,” with:

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NAACP Gives Major Banks Failing Grade on Diversity & Inclusion

NAACP Diversity and Inclusion in BankingJanuary 23, 2014 – Segment 2

We take a look at a recent NAACP report on diversity and inclusion in the consumer banking industry with Dedrick Muhammad, Senior Director of the Economic Department and Executive Director of the Financial Freedom Center at the NAACP.

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The Racial Politics Of Hip Hop

DDmDecember 2, 2013 – Segment 4

Center for Emerging Media’s Cultural Editor, Blues & Gospel singer Lea Gilmore joins us for a conversation on the racial politics of Hip Hop, Soul and Rock & Roll, in light of last week’s controversial American Music Awards. Baltimore-based rapper DDm also joins us.

 

 

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The Color Line: Living On A Diverse Baltimore Block

EastBaltimoreStNovember 26, 2013 – Hour 1

We discuss what it means to live on a diverse block in a city that’s still very divided along racial lines, as we follow-up on an article that Joan Jacobson wrote in the Urbanite magazine “The Color Line,” and talk with residents who have made their homes on a diverse block on East Baltimore Street in the Patterson Park neighborhood. Our guests include: Adam Stab, an artist, and a resident of East Baltimore Street since his adolescence; and Ed Rutkowski, Executive Director of the Patterson Park Public Charter School and co-founder of the Patterson Park Community Development Corporation.

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What Do SCOTUS, Paula Deen & George Zimmerman Say About Race in America?

Voting Rights RallyNovember 25, 2013 – Hour 1

We examine  race in American culture today, looking at the Supreme Court decision on voting rights, the Paula Deen controversy, and the George Zimmerman trial. Joining us are:

  • Jeff Menzise, senior researcher at the Institute for Urban Research at Morgan State University,
  • Derek Musgrove, assistant professor in the Department of History at University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC),
  • Marta Mossburg, columnist for the Baltimore Sun,
  • and Jason Silverstein, Ph.D. student in anthropology at Harvard University.

This segment originally aired July 1, 2013.

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Race, Justice & Culture: Renisha McBride, Marissa Alexander and “Knockout”

Renisha McBrideNovember 18, 2013 – Segment 2

We begin our show Monday morning with a look at a number of current stories that reflect upon issues of race, justice, and our culture. Topics include: the case of Renisha McBride, the 19-year old Michigan woman who was fatally shot in the face by a homeowner after her car broke down and she walked onto his porch seeking help; the case of Marissa Alexander, the Florida woman who fired a warning shot into the air to ward off her abusive husband and is now awaiting a new trial while serving a 20-year sentence; and the game of “knockout,” which is played by attacking an innocent pedestrian in an attempt to knock him or her unconscious with one punch. Our guests include:

  • Jamilah King, News Editor at Colorlines.com;
  • Nicole Glass-Brice, Deputy Director of the Community Conferencing Center in Baltimore;
  • Victoria Law, photographer, author of Resistance Behind Bars: The Struggles of Incarcerated Women and Editor of the zine Tenacious: Writings from Women in Prison;
  • and Dr. Raymond Winbush, Director of the Institute for Urban Research at Morgan State University.

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Cultural News Roundtable

rastawigOctober 29, 2013 – Segment 2

We host a cultural roundtable, where the topics will range from racist Halloween costumes to art, film and music. Our guests will include: Adar Ayira, project manager of the More in the Middle Campaign for Associated Black Charities and facilitator and analyst at Baltimore Racial Justice Action, a program of Fusion Partnerships; Michelle Antionette aka LOVE the Poet, poet, performance artist, and musician; and Amrita Kaur Dang, better known as Ami Dang, a South Asian-American musician from Baltimore.

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Sound Bites: 50 Million Hungry In Richest Country | Are America’s Food Debates Just White Men Talking?

Urban Farm (Image via Salon)September 10, 2013 – Hour 2

We start this week on Sound Bites by talking to Rose Aguilar, host of Your Call on KALW in San Francisco, who provides a commentary related to her recent Al Jazeera op-ed, “Richest country’s empty plates: Fifty million people in the United States go to bed hungry.”

Then, we look at an article that appeared on Salon.com last week, called, “America’s food debates are just white men talking,” by fitness, nutrition, and body-image blogger Ericka Nicole Kendall. We will discuss race, class, and the food movement with a diverse roundtable of guests, including:

  • Michael Twitty, Culinary Historian of African and African American Foodways and blogger at Afroculinaria;
  • Denzel Mitchell, founder of Five Seeds Farm & Apiary in Baltimore County;
  • Cleo Braver, owner of Cottingham Farm in Easton, MD;
  • and Rose Aguilar, host of Your Call on KALW in San Francisco.

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Rinku Sen: “The Racist Mind”

Rinku SenAugust 9, 2013 – Segment 4

In our continuing analysis of what the murder of Trayvon Martin means for America, we close out the week with Rinku Sen, President of the Applied Research Center and publisher of Colorlines, who recently wrote an article titled “The Racist Mind.”

Marc also says goodbye to Producer Bobby Marvin Holmes on his last day with the show.

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Sound Bites: 50 Million Hungry In Richest Country | Are America’s Food Debates Just White Men Talking?

Urban Farm (Image via Salon)August 6, 2013 – Segment 3

We start this week on Sound Bites by talking to Rose Aguilar, host of Your Call on KALW in San Francisco, who provides a commentary related to her recent Al Jazeera op-ed, “Richest country’s empty plates: Fifty million people in the United States go to bed hungry.”

Then, we look at an article that appeared onSalon.com last week, called, “America’s food debates are just white men talking,” by fitness, nutrition, and body-image blogger Ericka Nicole Kendall. We will discuss race, class, and the food movement with a diverse roundtable of guests, including:

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Supreme Court Decision On Voting Rights

voteJune 26, 2013 – Segment 1

We discuss this week’s Supreme Court decision striking down key provisions of the Voting Rights Act. The ruling allows nine states, mostly in the South, to change their election laws without advance federal approval. Joining us for the discussion are:

  • Ari Berman, contributing writer for The Nation magazine;
  • Aderson Francois, Associate Professor of Law at Howard University School of Law;
  • Michael Higginbotham, Wilson H. Elkins Professor of Law at the University of Baltimore School of Law.

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Biracial Family In Cheerios Ad Causes Online Storm

Biracial Family In Cheerios AdJune 4, 2013 – Segment 3

Meagan Hatcher-Mays, recent graduate of Washington University Law School in St. Louis and freelance contributor for Jezebel, offers a commentary on the Cheerios commercial that polarized the online community because of its depiction of a multiracial family.

Meagan wrote a piece for Jezebel titled, “I’m Biracial, And That Cheerios Ad is a Big Deal. Trust Me.


Sound Bites: Farmer’s Markets, Race, & Food Access In Our Region And Beyond, Plus A Unique Passover Recipe

Arthur Morgan's Gather Baltimore - Food Stand In Baltimore's Oliver Neighborhood

Arthur Morgan’s Gather Baltimore – Food Stand In Baltimore’s Oliver Neighborhood

March 21, 2013 – Segment 3

It’s a new episode of Sound Bites. We look at farmers markets in Maryland and beyond. We’ll hear from Alison Hope Alkon, Professor of Sociology at the University of the Pacific and author of Black, White, and Green: Farmers Markets, Race, and the Green Economy.

We’ll also hear from Anne Palmer, the Eating for the Future program director for Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future.

Visitors to the 32nd Street Farmers Market in Waverly talk to us about why farmers markets are important to them, including Arthur Morgan, a current OSI-Baltimore fellow working on a project called Gather Baltimore that puts unused food that would otherwise be wasted or disposed of into the hands of communities and organizations that need it. For those interested in supporting his cause, Arthur is looking for donations to help finance the refrigerated truck he uses to transport food, and is always looking for volunteers.

And finally, culinary historian Michael Twitty gives us a unique Passover recipe that fuses African-American and Jewish traditions.

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Django Unchained Up For Academy Award

Django UnchainedFebruary 20, 2013 – Segment 3

We listen back to a discussion we recorded earlier this year about the film Django Unchained, which is up for an Academy Award this weekend. We’re joined by:

  • Co-host Anthony McCarthy;
  • Janks Morton, filmmaker and founder of iYAGO Entertainment Group;
  • Dr. Raymond Winbush, Director of the Institute for Urban Research at Morgan State University;
  • Keli Goff, Political Correspondent for The Root and author of the books Party Crashing: How the Hip-Hop Generation Declared Political Independence and The GQ Candidate;
  • and Farai Chideya, journalist, author, and radio host.