The Marc Steiner Show

Philosophers’ Roundtable

Immigration and the Election

November 16, 2016 – Segment 1  anti-immigration

We begin the show with a discussion on Immigrant Communities and the Election. With: Zainab Chaudry, Maryland Outreach Manager for the Council on American Islamic Relations; Lydia Walther-Rodriguez, Lead Organizer for CASA Baltimore; and writer


Intersectionality in America

October 3, 2016 – Segment 2 intersectionality

We have a discussion on Intersectionality – discrimination experienced by people belonging to more than one minority group – jumping off from today’s Baltimore Sun article featuring Dr. Kaye, “Intersectionality concerns transcend straight, white feminism.” With: A. Adar Ayira, Project Manager of the More in the Middle Campaign for Associated Black Charities and facilitator and analyst at Baltimore Racial Justice Action, a program of Fusion Partnerships; Jennifer Eden, Peer Navigator and Communications Specialist who is also featured in the Baltimore Sun article and Jennifer Williams, assistant professor of English at Morgan State University.


Philosopher’s Roundtable: Policing & The Attack On #BlackLivesMatter

NYC action in solidarity with Ferguson. Mo, encouraging a boycott of Black Friday Consumerism.July 21, 2016 – Segment 2

It’s a Philosopher’s Roundtable on topics to include policing and the current attack on #BlackLivesMatter, with: Dr. Robert Birt, author of The Liberatory Thought of Martin Luther King Jr.: Critical Essays on the Philosopher King and Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Bowie State University; Navasha Daya, singer, songwriter, and co-Founder and Director of the healing and performing arts at the Youth Resiliency Institute; and Denzel Mitchell, Baltimore City resident, educator, farmer, and food justice advocate.


From The Archives: The Role Of Black Nationalism In Today’s Political & Cultural Landscape

Malcolm XMay 19, 2016 – Segment 2

We turn to a conversation about Black nationalism and its role in the political and cultural landscape today. Our guests include: Dr. Lester Spence, Center for Emerging Media Scholar-In-Residence and Associate Professor of Political Science and Africana Studies at Johns Hopkins University and author of Knocking the Hustle: Against the Neoliberal Turn in Black Politics; author and songwriter John Wesley; and Dr. Jeff Menzise, licensed school psychologist in Washington, DC, and author of Dumbin’ Down: Reflections on the Mis-Education of the Negro.


Rise In Gun Violence & The Complexities of Race, Religion & Politics

Mass Shooting (Credit: NY Times)December 7, 2015 – Segment 2

We look at the recent spate of violence in the U.S., as well as America’s love affair with guns and the complexities of race, religion and politics.

With: Dr. Marisela B. Gomez, physician, community activist and author of Race, Class, Power, and Organizing in East Baltimore: Rebuilding Abandoned Communities in America; the Rev. Todd Yeary, Senior Pastor of the Douglas Memorial Community Church; Dr. Daniel Webster, Director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Gun Policy and Research and Deputy Director for Research at the Johns Hopkins Center for the Prevention of Youth Violence; and Joshua Holland, contributing writer for The Nation, Writing Fellow with The Nation Institute, Host of Politics and Reality Radio, and author of the article “America Is Fine With Mass Shootings-as Long as They’re Not Perpetrated by Muslims.”


Guns in Society: Gun Control, Self Defense and Civil Rights

October 27, 2015 – Segment 2

We conclude today’s show by revisiting a Philosopher’s Roundtable from July 2015, which focused on the debate taking place around gun control, calls for self defense in light of the June 17th Shooting of 9 worshipers in a church in Charleston, South Carolina; and the role of guns in the civil rights movement. With: Firmin DeBrabander, Professor of Philosophy at the Maryland Institute College of Art and author of Do Guns Make us Free: Democracy and the Armed SocietyCharlie Cobb, author ofThis Nonviolent Stuff’ll Get You Killed: How Guns Made the Civil Rights Movement Possible; and Dante Barry, Executive Director of the Million Hoodies March for Justice.


National News Roundup: Umpqua College Shooting, Guns and Our Society

(photo by Mateusz Atroszko via www.freeimages.com/photo/gun-1623761)October 5, 2015 – Segment 1

We host a conversation about guns and our society, focusing on the shooting last week at Umpqua Community College. With: Dr. Natasha Pratt-Harris, Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at Morgan State University; Dr. Firmin DeBrabander, Professor of Philosophy at the Maryland Institute College of Art and author of Do Guns Make us Free: Democracy and the Armed Society; and Jamelle Bouie, Slate‘s chief political correspondent, who wrote the article “Mass Shootings Are Not The Real Problem.”

 


Philosopher’s Roundtable: Exploring & Analyzing Extreme Politics

Dr. Ben Carson (Photo Credit: Paul Lynch on Flickr)September 23, 2015 – Segment 1

In our show today  Dr. John Bullock sits in as host of the Marc Steiner Show. He is Professor of Political Science at Towson University.

We begin with a Philosopher’s Roundtable analyzing extreme politics. How does the rise of the Far Right and Far Left impact politics generally and what do those trends say about our society? We discuss the political outliers like Bernie Sanders, Donald Trump and Dr. Ben Carson, and the rise of the Far Right and Far Left in places like Greece and the election of Jeremy Corbyn as head of the Labour Party in the UK. Joining us are: Dr. Todd Steven Burroughs, journalist, historian and popular culture geek, who recently wrote the article in The Root, “History Repeats Itself With Backlash Against Black Empowerment“; Dr. Tara Bynum, Post-Doctoral Fellow in the English Department at Rutgers University; and Dr. Stella Rouse, Associate Professor in the Department of Government and Politics at the University of Maryland and Director of the Center for American Politics and Citizenship.


Reactions To ‘The Black Family in the Age of Mass Incarceration’

Ta-Nehisi Coates (Photo Credit: The Atlantic)September 16, 2015 – Segment 2

In our second segment our guests offer their review and analysis of Ta-Nehisi Coates’ article.

Our guests are Adar Ayira, Project Manager of the More in the Middle Campaign for Associated Black Charities and facilitator and analyst at Baltimore Racial Justice Action, a program of Fusion Partnerships; and Lenny McAllister, Republican strategist, former congressional candidate, and host of NightTalk: Get To The Point on the Pittsburgh cable news channel and Get Right with Lenny McAllister on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA in Pittsburgh.


Philosopher’s Roundtable: Exploring Institutional Racism

jimAugust 11, 2015 – Segment 3

It’s another Philosopher’s Roundtable, on Defining and Exploring Institutional Racism. “Institutional racism” is a term often used but not often clearly defined. We look at its definition and historical roots, especially as they relate to today.

Our panel of guests includes: A. Adar Ayira, Project Manager of the More in the Middle Initiative at Associated Black Charities and facilitator and analyst at Baltimore Racial Justice Action, a program of Fusion Partnerships; Doug Colbert,University of Maryland Law School professor and co-chair of the Society of American Law Teachers’ (SALT) Access to Justice Curriculum Project; Michael Higginbotham, Wilson H. Elkins Professor of Law at the University of Baltimore, and author of Ghosts of Jim Crow: Ending Racism in “Post-Racial” America; and freelance media maker Maegan La Mala Ortiz.


Philosopher’s Roundtable: Do Things Happen For A Reason?

August 10, 2015 – Segment 2philosophy

The show continues with another Philosopher’s Roundtable! In this repeat broadcast from last year, we ask the question: Do Things Happen for a Reason?

Our panel of guests includes: Dr. Joe Pettit, Associate Professor and Religious Studies Advisor in the Department of Philosophy & Religious Studies at Morgan State University; the Rev. Dr. Todd Yeary, Senior Pastor at Douglas Memorial Community Church in Baltimore; and Dr. Nyasha Grayman-Simpson, Associate Professor of Psychology at Goucher College.


Discussing Race & Class In The United States

classAugust 7, 2015 – Segment 3

We turn to a fascinating discussion from earlier this year, a Philosophers’ Roundtable on Race & Class In The United States.

With Dr. Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, Assistant Professor in Princeton University’s Center for African American Studies; and A. Adar Ayira, Project Manager of the More in the Middle Campaign for Associated Black Charities and facilitator and analyst at Baltimore Racial Justice Action, a program of Fusion Partnerships.

 


Philosophers’ Roundtable: Critiquing Eurocentric Philosophy

Edward SaidAugust 3, 2015 – Segment 1

We examine the critique that in the U.S. we focus on Eurocentric philosophies, and feature philosophers who are working to change that reality.

Our roundtable panel includes:

  • Hamid Dabashi, Hagop Kevorkian Professor of Iranian Studies and Comparative Literature at Columbia University
  • Tsenay Serequeberhan, Professor in the Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies at Morgan State University
  • Desiree Melton, Associate Professor of Philosophy at College of Notre Dame of Maryland.

Guns in Society: Gun Control, Self Defense, and Civil Rights

gunsJuly 28, 2015 – Segment 4

We host a philosopher’s roundtable on guns in our society, looking at the debate taking place now around gun control, calls for self defense in light of the shooting in Charleston, and the role of guns in the civil rights movement. With: Firmin DeBrabander, Professor of Philosophy at the Maryland Institute College of Art and author of Do Guns Make us Free: Democracy and the Armed Society; Charlie Cobb, author ofThis Nonviolent Stuff’ll Get You Killed: How Guns Made the Civil Rights Movement Possible; and Dante Barry, Executive Director of the Million Hoodies March for Justice.


Talking About Race: Poll Shows Over 60% Of Americans Believe U.S. Race Relations Are Bad

Black Lives MatterJuly 27, 2015 – Segment 3

In light of the CBS News/New York Times poll released last week revealing that over 60% of Americans believe that race relations in the U.S. are bad, we take on this tough topic.

Our panel of guests includes: Baynard Woods, Editor at Large for the Baltimore City Paper; Catalina Byrd, media consultant and political strategist, and co-host of No Hooks for the Hip Hop Chronicles on WEAA 88.9 FM; Jodi Kelber-Kaye, Associate Director of the Honors College at UMBC; and Dr. Desiree H. Melton, Associate Professor of Philosophy in the School of Arts & Sciences at Notre Dame of Maryland University.


LGBTQ Roundtable: Marriage Equality, Trans Rights, Racism, Stonewall & More

qtipocJune 30, 2015 – Segment 3

We host a roundtable discussion on LGBTQ issues, including the Supreme Court decision on same sex marriage, the 46th anniversary of the Stonewall riots, white supremacy in the gay rights movement, the struggles of trans people of color, politics beyond marriage equality, and more. With: Michael Franklin, Program Coordinator of Star Track Adolescent Health Program at the University of Maryland Baltimore and co-chair of GLSEN Baltimore, the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network; SONiA, singer, songwriter, visual artist, and member of disappear fear; Monica Stevens Yorkman, community activist from Baltimore of Sistas of the T and part of the Baltimore Trans Alliance; and Kalima Young, Director of the Baltimore Art + Justice Project, a project of the Office of Community Engagement at the Maryland Institute College of Art.


Symbols Of The Confederacy: Important Relics Of History Or Outdated Monuments Of Hate

Lee Jackson Statue in BaltimoreJune 24, 2015 – Segment 2

As the Confederate flag is still flying on the South Carolina Capitol grounds, we have a discussion about the symbolism and meaning of flying that flag, as well as monuments to the Confederacy in Baltimore and beyond.

We are joined by Zoe Carpenter, The Nation‘s Assistant Washington Editor, who wrote a blog post “A History of Hate Rock From Johnny Rebel to Dylann Roof“; Yoni Appelbaum, a senior editor at The Atlantic, where he oversees the Politics section and wrote article titled “Why Is The Flag Still There“; Chris Roberts, advocate and a doctoral student and instructor in the African American Studies Department at Temple University; Dr. Tara Bynum, assistant professor of English at Towson University; and Evan Serpick, Editor of the City Paper, wrote the article “Stop Honoring White Supremacy” and started an online petition to change the name of Robert E. Lee Park.


What Fanon Said: A Philosophical Introduction To His Life And Thought

Frantz FanonJune 19, 2015 – Segment 5

We close the show with a conversation with internationally renowned interpreter of Franz Fanon’s works, Lewis R. Gordon about his latest book What Fanon Said: A Philosophical Introduction To His Life And Thought.


Dr. Lester Spence: Black History, Policing & The Black Left

Black history and policingMay 28, 2015 – Segment 2

Our guest host is Dr. Lester Spence, Center for Emerging Media Scholar-In-Residence and Associate Professor of Political Science and Africana Studies at Johns Hopkins University. The topic is Black history and policing, with Daryl Scott, Professor of History and Chair of the Department of History at Howard University and outgoing President of the Association for the Study of African American Life.


Tengella’s Take: I’m African Y’all & That’s A Fact Y’all

Koli TengellaMay 22, 2015 – Segment 2

We begin the show with our weekly feature, Tengella’s Take, when actor, educator, and activist Koli Tengella offers his thoughts on our world today.

Koli is President of Tengella Edutainment, where he uses theater, Film & New Media for Positive Social Change. He is an instructor & creator of the positive social change theater/performing arts program at Augusta Fells Savage Institute of visual arts high school, and was a 2010 Open Society Institute Fellow.

 


Where Does Baltimore Go From Here?

protest baltimoreMay 5, 2015 – Segment 2

We continue our discussion of “Where does Baltimore go from here?” as the city begins to heal and move forward, with a focus on issues of poverty and upward mobility. We also ask if “Black culture” is a problem.

With: the Rev. Todd Yeary, Senior Pastor of the Douglas Memorial Community Church; Jessica Lewis, housing organizer at the Right to Housing Alliance; Dr. N.D.B. Connolly, Assistant Professor in the Department of History at Johns Hopkins University and author of A World More Concrete: Real Estate and the Remaking of Jim Crow South; and Diane Bell McKoy, President and Chief Executive Officer of Associated Black Charities.


Annapolis Update: Advocates & Legislators Working To Get Ex-Felons Voting Rights

Voting rights for ex-felonsApril 10, 2015 – Segment 3

The Maryland Legislative Session wraps up next week, and we will examine a number of the issues covered during the session. Our guests are: Charles Robinson, political and business correspondent for Maryland Public Television, who will discuss the Session in general; Diamonte Brown, Director of Out For Justice and co-chair of the Unlock The Vote Coalition that proposed and is championing the legislation; Toni Holness, Public Policy Associate at the ACLU of Maryland; and Perry Hopkins, Advocate and Community Organizer of Communities United.


Philosophers’ Roundtable: Race & Class In The United States

protestApril 6, 2015 – Segment 2

We host a discussion about race and class in the U.S. with Dr. Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, Assistant Professor in Princeton University’s Center for African American Studies; and A. Adar Ayira, Project Manager of the More in the Middle Campaign for Associated Black Charities and facilitator and analyst at Baltimore Racial Justice Action, a program of Fusion Partnerships.


Dr. Charles Johnson: Taming the Ox: Buddhist Stories and Reflections on Politics, Race, Culture, and Spiritual Practice

Dr. Charles JohnsonMarch 27, 2015 – Segment 1

Prepare to be inspired as Marc talks with National Book Award-winning novelist and scholar Dr. Charles Johnson about his newest book Taming the Ox: Buddhist Stories and Reflections on Politics, Race, Culture, and Spiritual Practice.


Black Women in Academia

Audre-LordeMarch 26, 2015 – Segment 5

We close out the show with a discussion of Black Women in Academia. Our guests are: Dr. Bonnie Thornton Dill, Dean of Arts and Humanities at the University of Maryland, College Park; Dr. Pamela Scott Johnson, Interim Dean of the College of Liberal Arts at Morgan State University; and Dr. Tara Bynum, Assistant Professor in the Department of English at Towson University.


State of Progressive Media In The United States

newspaperMarch 19, 2015 – Segment 2

We take a look at the state of progressive media. Our panel of guests will be: Sarah van Gelder, co-Founder and Editor-in-Chief of YES! Magazine and YesMagazine.org; Bhaskar Sunkara, Founding Editor of Jacobin and a Senior Editor at In These Times; and Glen Ford, Executive Editor of The Black Agenda Report.


Philosophers’ Roundtable: Race & Class In The United States

protestMarch 12, 2015 – Segment 4

We host a discussion and debate about race and class in the U.S. with Dr. Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, Assistant Professor in Princeton University’s Center for African American Studies; and A. Adar Ayira, Project Manager of the More in the Middle Campaign for Associated Black Charities and facilitator and analyst at Baltimore Racial Justice Action, a program of Fusion Partnerships.


Masculinities — Intersections: Sexuality, Gender, Race, and Ethnicity

masculinitiesMarch 4, 2015 – Segment 4

We offer a preview of Morgan State University’s (MSU) academic symposium “Intersections: Sexuality, Gender, Race, and Ethnicity,” which is taking place from 9am to 4pm on Saturday, March 7th, in Morgan’s Student Center. The theme of this year’s symposium is “Masculinities.”

Joining us to discuss the event are: Kylar Broadus, Rockwood Leadership Fellow, Founder of Trans People of Color Coalition, Senior Public Policy Counsel and Leader of the Transgender Civil Rights Project At Task Force;  Dr. Mark Anthony Neal, Professor of African & African American Studies at Duke University, host of Left of Black, and author of the book Leroy: Illegible Black MasculinitiesBakari Jones, Founder and Executive Director of Bois of Baltimore; and Dr. Anika Simpson, Associate Professor of Philosophy and Religious Studies and Coordinator of the Women’s and Gender Studies Program at MSU.


From The Archives: Talking Autonomous Marxism And More With Silvia Federici & George Caffentzis

Silvia Federici and George CaffentzisFebruary 27, 2015 – Segment 3

We bring you a special archive edition of The Marc Steiner Show, my conversation with Autonomous Marxists Silvia Federici and George Caffentzis, who stopped by the studio when then were in town last year. Federici’s latest book.Revolution at Point Zero, collects forty years of research and theorizing on the nature of housework, social reproduction, and women’s struggles, to reconstruct it in ways that provide an alternative to capitalist relations. Caffentzis’ newest work is In Letters of Blood and Fire: Work, Machines, and Value, a collection of essays that explores Marx’s relevancy in the 21st century.

This segment originally aired February 2014.


The Philosophy and Spirituality of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

MLK_BWJanuary 19, 2015 – Segment 2

We begin our celebration of the life of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. with a discussion about his contributions, not only as a civil rights activist, but as a philosopher and spiritual leader.

With: E. Ethelbert Miller, poet and literary activist, board member of the Institute for Policy Studies, Director of the African American Resource Center at Howard University, and former Chair of the Humanities Council of Washington, D.C.; Dr. Gilda Daniels, Associate Professor of Law at the University of Baltimore School of Law; and Dr. Stacey A. Peterson, Associate Professor and Chair, Communication Arts, School of Arts and Sciences, Notre Dame of Maryland University.


If You Were Mayor: New Year’s Resolutions for Baltimore City

DOWNTOWN_BMORE_1January 14, 2015 – Segment 4

In the latest installment of our feature “If You Were Mayor of Baltimore”, we’re talking New Year’s resolutions. Our panel of influential Baltimoreans discuss their hopes and aspirations for our city in 2015.

Our guests include: Dr. Lester Spence, Center for Emerging Media Scholar-In-Residence and Associate Professor of Political Science and Africana Studies at Johns Hopkins University; David Troy, CEO and co-founder at 410Labs, and creator of Mailstrom; and D. Watkins, writer and contributor to City Paper whose Salon story “Too Poor for Pop Culture” sparked a national conversation.


Taming the Ox: Buddhist Stories and Reflections on Politics, Race, Culture, and Spiritual Practice

Dr. Charles JohnsonJanuary 9, 2015 – Hour 1

Prepare to be inspired as I talk with National Book Award-winning novelist and scholar Dr. Charles Johnson about his newest book Taming the Ox: Buddhist Stories and Reflections on Politics, Race, Culture, and Spiritual Practice.


Philosophers’ Roundtable: Predictions About The Political, Cultural & Social Changes Of 2015

FERGUSON, MO - AUGUST 12:  Demonstrators protest the killing of teenager Michael Brown on August 12, 2014 in Ferguson, Missouri. Brown was shot and killed by a police officer on Saturday in the St. Louis suburb of Ferguson. Ferguson has experienced two days of violent protests since the killing but, tonight's protest was peaceful.  (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)January 5, 2015 – Segment 4

We will host our first Philosophers’ Roundtable of 2015. Our panel of guests includes: Dr. Lester Spence, Associate Professor of Political Science and Africana Studies at Johns Hopkins University, Center for Emerging Media Scholar-in-Residence, and author of Stare in the Darkness: The Limits of Hip-Hop and Black Politics; Dr. Desiree Melton, Associate Professor of Philosophy at Notre Dame of Maryland University; and Dr. Joe Pettit, Associate Professor of Philosophy and Religious Studies Advisor at Morgan State University.

 


Beyond Ferguson: Moving Towards Societal Change & Talking To Kids About Race

african-american-kidsDecember 17, 2014 – Segment 2

We host a special discussion on lessons from Ferguson and practical advice for parents on how to talk with their children about race and societal change.

With: the Rev. Dr. Heber Brown, community activist, pastor of Pleasant Hope Baptist Church and Executive Director of Orisha’s Cross Freedom School; Dr. Kimberly Moffitt, Associate Professor of American Studies at University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) and co-editor of Blackberries and Redbones: Critical Articulations of Black Hair/Body Politics in Africana Communities; and Dr. Karsonya “Kaye” Whitehead, Assistant Professor of Communication and Affiliate Assistant Professor of African and African American Studies at Loyola University Maryland, and author of Notes from a Colored Girl: The Civil War Pocket Diaries of Emile Frances Davis and the forthcoming Letters to My Black Sons: Raising Boys in a Post-Racial America.

 


From The Archives: Dr. Temple Grandin On ‘The Autistic Brain’

Temple GrandinDecember 12, 2014 – Segment 4

Listen in to another special archive edition of the Show, as I talk with the fascinating and inspirational author and scientist Dr. Temple Grandin. Grandin, professor of Animal Science at Colorado State University and a consultant on animal behavior to the livestock industry, talks about her 2013 book The Autistic Brain: Thinking Across the Spectrum. She offers her unique perspective on autism, agriculture, and creativity.


If You Were Mayor: UB, MICA & Morgan Students Talk Baltimore-Ferguson Solidarity And Visions For The City

Joseph KentDecember 10, 2014 – Segment 3

In our newest “If I were Mayor of Baltimore” segments, we talk to local student leaders involved in local Ferguson protests and more, who share their visions for our city.

Our guests are: Shahrazad Abdelmeguid, student at the University of Baltimore School of Law and President of the American Constitution Society for Law and Policy; Michaela Brown, student at Morgan State University, organizer, and board member of the Baltimore Algebra Project; Bryan Upshur, student at the University of Baltimore School of Law and Parliamentarian, Black Law Student Association; Joseph Kent, community leader and organizer, and student at Morgan State University; Briana Arrington, President of the Black Student Union and Women’s Programming at MICA; and Nikki Hendricks, Vice President of the Black Student Union at MICA.


Bill Cosby Rape Allegations

cosbyNovember 18, 2014 – Segment 3

We turn our attention to the recent rape allegations against Bill Cosby. Our panel of guests includes: Andrea Plaid, media analyst whose views on race, gender, and sexuality have appeared in the Washington Post, Chicago Tribune, andRacialicious;  Dr. Karsonya “Kaye” Whitehead, Assistant Professor of Communication and Affiliate Assistant Professor of African and African American Studies at Loyola University Maryland; and Dr. Jennifer Williams, Assistant Professor of English and Women’s and Gender Studies at Morgan State University and blogger for Ms. Magazine.

 


Philosophers’ Roundtable: Do Things Happen for a Reason?

Do Things Happen for a Reason?November 6, 2014 – Segment 3

We host another Philosophers’ Roundtable! We ask the question: Do Things Happen for a Reason? Inspired by an op-ed piece in the New York Times last month.

Our panel of guests includes: Dr. Joe Pettit, Associate Professor and Religious Studies Advisor in the Department of Philosophy & Religious Studies at Morgan State University; the Rev. Dr. Todd Yeary, Senior Pastor at Douglas Memorial Community Church in Baltimore; and Dr. Nyasha Grayman-Simpson, Associate Professor of Psychology at Goucher College.

 

 


Art, Music, Politics & Remix Culture with DJ Spooky and Paul Rucker

Paul RuckerSeptember 19, 2014 – Segment 3

We bring you a special archive edition of The Marc Steiner Show, with Paul D. Miller, aka DJ Spooky, musician, writer, and conceptual artist, and Paul Rucker,visual artist, composer, and musician. We discuss art, music, politics, the war on drugs, and remix culture.

LINK


Talking Peace with Iraq War Veteran Paul K. Chappell

Paul ChappellSeptember 18, 2014 – Segment 5

We close out the show with Paul K. Chappell, author, speaker, Iraq War veteran, and Peace Leadership Director at the Nuclear Age Peace Foundation.

Chappell will be the keynote speaker Thursday September 18 at noon at the Central Maryland Ecumenical Council’s Fall Luncheon Series.

LINK


What Would You Do If You Were Mayor Of Baltimore?

City HallSeptember 17, 2014 – Segment 2

A group of bright young Baltimoreans answer the question: What Would You Do If You Were Mayor Of Baltimore? Our in-studio panel includes: Megan Sherman, Producer for The Real News NetworkDayvon Love, Director of Research and Public Policy for Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle; and Zeke Berzoff-Cohen, Executive Director of The Intersection.

LINK


Child Abuse: When Does “Disciplining” Go Too Far?

Child Abuse and spankingSeptember 16, 2014 – Segment 2

In light of the recent news that Minnesota Vikings player Adrian Peterson has been accused of child abuse for injuries he allegedly inflicted while disciplining his son, we take a look at the issue of child abuse, and when does “disciplining” go too far?

With: Dr. Lawrence Brown, activist, public health consultant, and Assistant Professor of Public Health at Morgan State University; Dr. Lester Spence, Center for Emerging Media Scholar-in-Residence and Associate Professor of Political Science and Africana Studies at Johns Hopkins University; and Dr. Kaye Whitehead, Assistant Professor of Communication and Affiliate Assistant Professor of African and African American Studies at Loyola University Maryland.

LINK


Can 21st Century Capitalism And Marxist Theory Coexist?

Smith, Marx, Schumpeter and KeynesSeptember 5, 2014 – Segment 4

We close out the show with a special archive edition of The Marc Steiner Show, as a panel of political scientists and economists wrestle with the question: “Can 21st Century Capitalism And Marxist Theory Coexist?”

Our panel includes: Dr. Steven Isberg, Associate Professor of Finance in the Merrick School of Business at the University of Baltimore; Dr. Samuel Chambers, Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at the Johns Hopkins University; Dr. Linda Loubert, Assistant Professor in the Economics Department at Morgan State University; andDr. Richard D. Wolff, Professor of Economics Emeritus at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and author of a number of books including Democracy at Work: A Cure for Capitalism.

Podcast will be available soon for this archive edition of the show.


Why Was Cambridge Teacher Patrick McLaw Suspended?

cambridgeSeptember 3, 2014 – Segment 5

We continue our conversation about the Cambridge, Maryland middle school teacher, Patrick McLaw, who was suspended from his teaching duties supposedly for writing a scifi novel about a school shooting that takes place in the year 2902. Recent news updates, though, suggest that this is not the whole story. We talk about what this means for free speech of teachers and the critical potential of scifi with Dr. Roni Ellington, Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at Morgan State University and Ytasha Womack, filmmaker, dancer and author of Afrofuturism: The World of Black Sci Fi and Fantasy.

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Masculinity and Violence

300-man-marchAugust 14, 2014 – Segment 2

Guest host Dr. Lawrence Brown, Assistant Professor of Public Health at Morgan State University, sits in for Marc. We turn to the topic of Masculinity and Violence. Our guests are: Michael Eugene Johnson, Executive Director of the Paul Robeson Institute for Social Change, and Bobby Marvin Holmes, youth development professional, filmmaker and co-producer Of Live Young Blood, Producer of the Anthony Mccarthy Show on WEAA.

LINK


Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle Update

dayvonadamJuly 30, 2014 – Segment 5

We speak with members of Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle about projects they are working on now. We are joined by Adam Jackson, CEO, Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle; and Dayvon Love, Director of Research and Public Policy, Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle.

LINK


Role of Masculinity, Media & Culture in Youth Violence

violenceJuly 22, 2014 – Segment 2

We turn to the topic of violence, its representation in the media and culture, masculinity’s role in violence, and violence’s effects on our youth. Our panel of guests includes: Dr. Lawrence Brown, activist, public health consultant, and Assistant Professor of Public Health at Morgan State University; Meshelle, The Indie Mom Of Comedy, former OSI Baltimore Community Fellow and Founder of Goaldiggers, The Sankofa Project; and the Rev. Heber Brown, community activist and Pastor at Pleasant Hope Baptist Church.

LINK


Debating Reparations: Exploring the Politics & Economics

The September 1966 Cicero protest against housing discrimination was one of the first nonviolent civil-rights campaigns launched near a major city. (Associated Press)June 2, 2014 – Segment 3

Our distinguished panel of guests will discuss and debate the issues raised in essayist Ta-Nehisi Coates’ The Case for Reparations“:

  • Dr. Nathan Connolly, Assistant Professor in the Department of History at Johns Hopkins University and author of A World More Concrete: Real Estate and the Remaking of Jim Crow South;
  • Hughey P. Newsome, member of the national advisory council of the Project 21 black leadership network, member of the MoveOnUp.org black political network, and blogger at The Objective Citizenwww.theobjectivecitizen.com;
  • Reniqua Allen, Emerging Voices Fellow at Demoswhere she writes for their PolicyShop blog, and former producer for Moyers & Company;
  • Dr. Peniel Joseph, Professor of History at Tufts University and author of the award-winning Waiting ‘Til the Midnight Hour: A Narrative History of Black Power in America and Dark Days, Bright Nights: From Black Power to Barack Obama;
  • and W. James Antle III, Editor of the Daily Caller News Foundation, Senior Editor of the American Spectator, Contributing Editor to the American Conservative, and author of the book Devouring Freedom: Can Big Government Ever Be Stopped?

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Ta-Nehisi Coates: The Case for Reparations

The Case for ReparationsJune 2, 2014 – Segment 2

In the cover story for the June issue of The Atlantic, essayist Ta-Nehisi Coates makes “The Case for Reparations.” Coates argues that Black Americans as a group – because of slavery, segregation, and Federal housing policy – have been prevented from building inter-generational wealth.

We begin the show with my interview with Ta-Nehisi Coates about his article, which has reignited a national discussion on the topic of reparations.

LINK


Sojourner Truth’s “Ain’t I A Woman?”: African American Women & Feminism

Sojourner TruthMay 30, 2014 – Segment 3

May 29 marked the 163rd anniversary of Sojourner Truth’s “Ain’t I a Woman?” speech. Center for Emerging Media cultural correspondent Lea Gilmore joins us for a reading of that speech. Then, we discuss African American women and feminism with:

  • Lea Gilmore, singer, activist, and Center for Emerging Media cultural correspondent;
  • dream hampton, writer, filmmaker and co-author of the New York Times best seller Decoded
  • A. Adar Ayira, project manager of the More in the Middle Campaign for Associated Black Charities and facilitator and analyst at Baltimore Racial Justice Action;
  • Jodi Kelber-Kaye, Associate Director of the Honors College at UMBC and former faculty member in Gender and Women’s Studies there.

This segment originally aired May 29, 2013.

LINK


Is Hip-Hop Killing Black Youth?

Move That DopeMay 30, 2014 – Segment 2

Our panel of guests discusses an article by author, filmmaker and Coppin State University teacher D. WatkinsHow Glamorizing Drugs Is Killing Black Kids, which considers a connection between youth, Hip Hop, and drug dealing. Watkins joins us, as well as: Michelle Antionette aka LOVE the Poet, poet, performance artist, and musician; Baltimore-based rappers DDm and Dez; and Dante Wilson, CEO and Founder of Reclaiming Our Children and Community Project, Inc.

This segment originally aired March 17, 2014.

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What’s White Male Privilege and Why Is It So Difficult To Talk About?

White Male PrivilegeMay 15, 2014 – Segment 3

We ask the questions: What Is White Male Privilege? And Why Is It So Hard To Talk About? Inspired by the discussion around Princeton Freshman Tal Fortgang’s controversial essay on the topic of privilege, reprinted in Time last week, we talk with our panel:

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The Coates: A Father & Son Discuss the Road to Manhood

The Coates' and MarcApril 25, 2014 – Segment 5

Ta-Nehisi Coates is an author whose new book is called The Beautiful Struggle: A Father, Two Sons, and an Unlikely Road to Manhood.  Paul Coates is the father mentioned in the title.  He’s the founder of Black Classic Press.  They joined us to discuss the complexities of coming of age and raising a family in black, urban America.  Their real-life story takes place in Baltimore, but could translate easily to many cities around the United States.

Ta-Nehisi has written for numerous publications including The Village Voice, Time, The Nation, NY Times Magazine, The Atlantic, and O.  I would recommend his blog as a great place to check out some of his writing.  Also, click here for a recent interview Ta-Nehisi did with us focusing largely on the ’08 presidential campaigns.

This segment was originally recorded on June 4, 2008.

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The Pursuit of Happiness: The Founders v. All of Us

The Pursuit of Happiness

April 10, 2014 – Hour 2

This week is the WEAA Happiness Spring Membership Drive, so tune in for compelling topics and wonderful premiums! Now is your opportunity to support the station you have come to love: WEAA, THE Voice of the Community. Call 410-319-8888 or visit weaa.org to make your pledge of support during the show.

What does “happiness” mean to you? Keeping in theme with WEAA’s “Happiness Spring Membership Drive,” join us for a discussion about the pursuit of happiness!  We will examine what that phrase meant to the founders of the United States, what it means to us today, and how we can create a world where everyone has the right to happiness. Joining us for this conversation are Dr. Kimberly Moffitt, Assistant Professor of American Studies at UMBC;  Jeff Singer, Founder and former Executive Director of Health Care for the Homeless and instructor at the University of Maryland School of Social Work; and Alex Boston, former director of Homeless Services in Baltimore City and Country Director for the Peace Corps in Kyrgyzstan and Jordan.

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Philosopher’s Roundtable: Defining & Exploring Institutional Racism

African American flood victims lined up to get food & clothing fr. Red Cross relief station in front of billboard extolling WORLD'S HIGHEST STANDARD OF   LIVING/ THERE'S NO WAY LIKE THE AMERICAN WAY. City: LOUISVILLE State: KY Country: US Photographer: MARGARET BOURKE-WHITE/TimePixMarch 3, 2014 – Segment 3

Institutional racism is something we hear a lot about, but something that is not often enough defined. We look at its definition and historical roots, especially as they relate to today. Our panel of guests includes:

This segment originally aired February 4, 2013.

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Autonomous Marxists Silvia Federici & George Caffentzis

Silvia Federici and George CaffentzisFebruary 6, 2014 – Segment 2

Autonomous Marxists Silvia Federici & George Caffentzis stopped by when they were in town. Federici’s latest book Revolution at Point Zero, collects forty years of research and theorizing on the nature of housework, social reproduction, and women’s struggles as alternatives to capitalist relations. Caffentzis’ new work is In Letters of Blood and Fire: Work, Machines, and Value, a collection of essays that explores Marx’s relevancy in the 21st century.

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Violence, Youth, Masculinity, And Culture

violencebaltimoreJanuary 30, 2014 – Segment 3

We turn to the topic of violence, its representation in the media and culture, masculinity’s role in violence, and violence’s effects on our youth. Our panel of guests includes: Dr. Lawrence Brown, activist, public health consultant, and Assistant Professor of Public Health at Morgan State University; Meshelle, The Indie Mom Of Comedy, former OSI Baltimore Community Fellow and Founder of Goaldiggers, The Sankofa Project; and the Rev. Heber Brown, community activist and Pastor at Pleasant Hope Baptist Church.

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Violence In American Society: What Does It Say About Us?

Shootings in USANovember 12, 2013 – Segment 2

We begin the show with a roundtable on violence in our society. Our guests  include:

  • Dr. Jessica Klein, author of The Bully Society: School Shootings and the Crisis of Bullying in America’s Schools;
  • Kimberly M. Armstrong, inspirational speaker, author and consultant;
  • Dr. Lawrence Brown, assistant professor of Public Health in the School of Community Health and Policy at Morgan State University;
  • and Anthony McCarthy, community activist and host of The Anthony McCarthy Show on WEAA.

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Cultural News Roundtable

rastawigOctober 29, 2013 – Segment 2

We host a cultural roundtable, where the topics will range from racist Halloween costumes to art, film and music. Our guests will include: Adar Ayira, project manager of the More in the Middle Campaign for Associated Black Charities and facilitator and analyst at Baltimore Racial Justice Action, a program of Fusion Partnerships; Michelle Antionette aka LOVE the Poet, poet, performance artist, and musician; and Amrita Kaur Dang, better known as Ami Dang, a South Asian-American musician from Baltimore.

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Could 21st Century Capitalism And Marxist Theory Coexist?

Karl MarxOctober 21, 2013 – Segment 2

We reflect on our economic landscape and pose the question: was Marx right? We think about whether or not Marx has a place in today’s world and the future of the economy with a panel, including:

  • Steven Isberg, Associate Professor of Finance in the Merrick School of Business at the University of Baltimore;
  • Samuel Chambers, Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at the Johns Hopkins University;
  • Dr. Linda Loubert, Assistant Professor in the Economics Department at Morgan State University.
  • and Richard D. Wolff, Professor of Economics Emeritus at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and author of many books including his newest: Democracy at Work: A Cure for Capitalism.

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Philosophers’ Roundtable On Violence

drookerOctober 21, 2013 – Segment 1

We speak with religious, ethical, and philosophical thinkers about violence in our country. Why is violence so omnipresent in our daily lives? Is the United States an exceptionally violent nation? What does it mean to create a more humane and just society?  Can it be done?  And how do we do it here? Our guests include

  • Rev. Dr. Brad Braxton, Senior Pastor at the Open Church in Baltimore and Lois Craddock Perkins Professor of Homiletics at Perkins School of Theology in Dallas, Texas;
  • Brendan Walsh, a former priest who helps run Viva House, a Catholic Worker soup kitchen;
  • E.R. Shipp,  Journalist-in-Residence and Associate Professor of Journalism at Morgan State University, and
  • Latonia Valincia, playwright, director, author and motivational speaker.

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National News Roundtable

Pope FrancisSeptember 23, 2013 – Segment 1

We kickoff the week Monday morning at 9:00 with a news roundtable on the issues of the day, including: Pope Francis’ recent statements on controversial subjects such as Syria, abortion, and the LGBT community; the hostage situation in Nairobi; and racial profiling and the death of Jonathan Ferrell, a former Texas A&M football player who was killed by police in North Carolina on September 14 after crawling from his wrecked car and seeking help at the home of a woman who panicked and called 911. Our panel of guests include: Edward Wyckoff Williams, Contributing Editor for The Root; The Rev. Meredith Moise, ordained minister, writer, community activist and teacher; Dr. John Bullock, professor of Political Science at Towson University; and Monsignor Stuart Swetland, Vice President of Catholic Identity at Mt. St. Mary’s University.

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Maryland Hunger Solutions, A Place At The Table, & Tackling Food Insecurity In Our Community

A Place At The TableSeptember 12, 2013 – Segment 2

We talk to Michael J. Wilson, Director of Maryland Hunger Solutions; Lisa Klingenmaier, Anti-Hunger Program Associate at Maryland Hunger Solutions; and Tony Simmons, advocate and member of Housing Our Neighbors (HON) who is experiencing food insecurity and homelessness; about an event happening Thursday night sponsored by Maryland Hunger Solutions and Active Voice.

The groups will be screening the documentary film A Place At The Table at the Charles Theater in Baltimore Thursday night, and hosting a community conversation about food access, hunger, and poverty in our community.

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Philosophers’ Roundtable on Eurocentric Philosophy

EdwardSaidJuly 25, 2013 – Segment 1

We examine the critique that in the U.S. we focus on Eurocentric philosophies, and feature philosophers who are working to change that reality.

Our roundtable panel includes:

  • Hamid Dabashi, Hagop Kevorkian Professor of Iranian Studies and Comparative Literature at Columbia University
  • Tsenay Serequeberhan, Professor in the Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies at Morgan State University
  • Desiree Melton, Associate Professor of Philosophy at College of Notre Dame of Maryland.

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Philosophers’ Roundtable On Violence In USA

tankJuly 24, 2013 – Segment 1

We speak with religious, ethical, and philosophical thinkers about violence in our country. Why is violence so omnipresent in our daily lives? Is the United States an exceptionally violent nation? What does it mean to create a more humane and just society?  Can it be done?  And how do we do it here? Our guests include

  • Rev. Dr. Brad Braxton, Senior Pastor at the Open Church in Baltimore and Lois Craddock Perkins Professor of Homiletics at Perkins School of Theology in Dallas, Texas;
  • Brendan Walsh, a former priest who helps run Viva House, a Catholic Worker soup kitchen;
  • E.R. Shipp,  Journalist-in-Residence and Associate Professor of Journalism at Morgan State University, and
  • Latonia Valincia, playwright, director, author and motivational speaker.

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Who We Were At Seventeen

TrayvonJuly 19, 2013 – Segment 2

Actor and social commentator Keith Snipes sits in as host for Marc Steiner. In light of the Zimmerman verdict, we’ll speak with a number of men about who they were at the age of 17, the age that Trayvon Martin was when he was killed by George Zimmerman last year. We’re joined by:

  • John Bullock, Professor of Political Science at Towson University,
  • Justin Gladden, Broadcast Operations Manager for WMJF-LP at Towson University and co-director of Live Young Blood, and
  • Lawrence Brown, political activist and public health consultant and Assistant Professor of Public Health at Morgan State University.

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Ain’t I A Woman? African American Women And Feminism

July 17, 2013 – Hour 2

This year marks the 162nd anniversary of Sojourner Truth’s “Ain’t I a Woman?” speech. Center for Emerging Media cultural correspondent Lea Gilmore joins us for a reading of that speech. Then, we discuss African American women and feminism with:

  • Lea Gilmore, singer, activist, and Center for Emerging Media cultural correspondent;
  • dream hampton, writer, filmmaker and co-author of the New York Times best seller Decoded
  • A. Adar Ayira, project manager of the More in the Middle Campaign for Associated Black Charities and facilitator and analyst at Baltimore Racial Justice Action;
  • Jodi Kelber-Kaye, Associate Director of the Honors College at UMBC and former faculty member in Gender and Women’s Studies there.

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Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Philosophy & Its Relevance Today

Martin Luther King, Jr.June 27, 2013 – Segment 3

We discuss the philosophy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and his relevance as a thinker-activist today. Our guests include:

  • Robert E. Birt, author of The Liberatory Thought of Martin Luther King Jr.: Critical Essays on the Philosopher King and assistant professor of Philosophy at Bowie State University;
  • actor and writer Keith Snipes; 
  • and E.R. Shipp, journalist-in-residence and associate professor of Journalism at Morgan State University.

 

 

 

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Is Black Nationalism Relevant In Today’s Politics & Culture?

Black NationalismJune 19, 2013 – Segment 2

We turn to a conversation about black nationalism and its role in the political and cultural landscape today. Our guests include:

  • Dr. Lester Spence, Center for Emerging Media Scholar-In-Residence and Associate Professor of Political Science and Africana Studies at Johns Hopkins University;
  • author and songwriter John Wesley;
  • and Dr. Jeff Menzise, licensed school psychologist in Washington, DC, and author of Dumbin’ Down: Reflections on the Mis-Education of the Negro.

 

 

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What Makes People Commit The Most Evil Acts?

Missing Women FoundMay 14, 2013 – Segment 1

We start the show with a discussion of evil in the wake of the Cleveland kidnapping case. What makes seemingly normal people commit the most heinous acts? Are people committing evil acts sociopaths, or is this another instance of the banality of evil? Is evil even the right word to describe this?

Joining us to wrestle with these questions are:

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Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Theological Influences

Martin Luther King Jr's Theological InfluencesApril 3, 2013 – Hour 1

We honor the 45th anniversary of Martin Luther King, Jr.’s death (April 4th, 1968) one day early. We discuss two of the major influences on King’s theology, Howard Thurman and Abraham Joshua Heschel.

Our guests are Rev. Dr. Brad Braxton, Senior Pastor at the Open Church in Baltimore and Lois Craddock Perkins Professor of Homiletics at the Perkins School of Theology in Dallas Texas, and Dr. Edward Kaplan, Kaiserman Professor of Humanities at Brandeis University and author of Spiritual Radical: Abraham Joshua Heschel in America 1940-1972.

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Could 21st Century Capitalism And Marxist Theory Coexist?

Karl MarxApril 2, 2013 – Segment 1

We reflect on our economic landscape and pose the question: was Marx right? We think about whether or not Marx has a place in today’s world and the future of the economy with a panel, including:

  • Steven Isberg, Associate Professor of Finance in the Merrick School of Business at the University of Baltimore;
  • Samuel Chambers, Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at the Johns Hopkins University;
  • Dr. Linda Loubert, Assistant Professor in the Economics Department at Morgan State University.
  • and Richard D. Wolff, Professor of Economics Emeritus at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and author of many books including his newest: Democracy at Work: A Cure for Capitalism.

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Philosophers’ Roundtable on Eurocentric Philosophies

February 11, 2013 – Hour 2

We will examine the critique that in the U.S. we focus on Eurocentric philosophies, and will feature philosophers who are working to change that reality.

Our roundtable panel includes:

  • Hamid Dabashi, Hagop Kevorkian Professor of Iranian Studies and Comparative Literature at Columbia University
  • Tsenay Serequeberhan, Professor in the Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies at Morgan State University
  • Desiree Melton, Associate Professor of Philosophy at College of Notre Dame of Maryland.

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