The Marc Steiner Show

Archive for racism

Sherrilyn Ifill: American Politics and The LDF

Sherrilyn Ifill (Credit: Speakerpedia)March 24, 2017 – Segment 2

We hosted a conversation with Sherrilyn Ifill, the seventh President and Director-Counsel of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, regarding the hearings of the Neil Gorsuch nomination the NAACP Legal Defense Fund.

 

 


Tengella’s Take: Systematic Racism Is A Mental Illness

tengellaFebruary 10, 2017 – Segment 1

We hosted our newest edition of our weekly segment Tengella’s Take, with Center for Emerging Media Satirical Commentator Koli Tengella. Tengella is President of Tengella Edutainment, an instructor and creator of the Positive Social Change Performing Arts Program at Augusta Fells Savage Institute of Visual Arts High School, and he was a 2010 Open Society Institute Fellow.


Recapping the Oscars & Discussing Race in the Film Industry

3001714270_2e74ccde42_zFebruary 29, 2016 – Segment 1

We host a panel discussion on last night’s Academy Awards. With: Sameer Rao, Culture Reporter for Colorlines; Kalima Young, instructor at Towson University and University of Maryland College Park; Ann Hornaday, Washington Post Film Critic; and filmmaker Chris Eyre, enrolled member of the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes.


Baltimore City Circuit Court Candidate: Todd Oppenheim

ToddpicJanuary 6, 2016 – Segment 3

Today we talk with Todd Oppenheim, is a criminal defense attorney with the Office of Public Defender and  is assigned to the Baltimore City Felony Trial Unit. Mr. Oppenheim has had many articles published on policy reform within the Baltimore City judicial system; he is also a candidate for judge in the Baltimore City Circuit Court.


Hartford County, Maryland Cross Burnings

November 3, 2015 – Segment 2Screen Shot 2015-11-04 at 12.37.30 AM

Next we turn our focus to recent reports of cross burnings in Harford County, Maryland. Marc is joined by Gina Pierleoni, concerned resident of Bel Air, Maryland, mixed media artist, and adjunct Painting and Drawing Professor at Harford Community College.


The Baltimore Uprising & Food Sovereignty

October 22, 2015  – Segment 3Screen Shot 2015-10-22 at 3.07.04 PM

Our show concludes with a ruminative glance at  the correlation between  food insecurity in Baltimore and what has come to be known as the Baltimore Uprising, the demonstrations and violence that occurred after the death of Freddie Gray.  The discussion features commentary from Michael Twitty, Culinary Historian of African and African American Foodways and blogger at Afroculinaria; Walker Marsh, Founder and owner of the Flower Factory; Sache Jones, Food Justice Consultant for the Park Heights Community Health Alliance and Manager of the AFYA Community Teaching Garden in Park Heights; and Blain Snipstal, returning generation farmer on the Eastern Shore of Maryland at Black Dirt Farm.

This week is the WEAA Fall Membership Drive, so tune in for compelling topics and wonderful premiums! Now is your opportunity to support the station you have come to love: WEAA, THE Voice of the Community. Call 410-319-8888 or visit weaa.org to make your pledge of support during the show

 


The Last of These: An Examination Of Immigration Detention Centers In The US

October 16, 2015 – Segment 5Thelast

We present an archive edition of The Marc Steiner Show as we listen back to an interview with directors and producers of the documentary film The Least of These, which examines the realities of immigration detention centers across our country. With: Clark Lyda, Director and Producer of The Least of These; Jesse Lyda, Director and Producer of The Least of These; and Marcy Garriott, Producer of The Least of These.


Paul Rucker’s “Rewind” At The Baltimore Museum Of Art

October 16, 2015 – Segment 4
Paulrucker

We continue our exploration of local art as Marc travels to the Baltimore Museum of Art for another tour: artist and musician Paul Rucker‘s Rewind exhibition, which is one of the Baker Artist Awards exhibitions. Rewind touches on racism both in the past and today, and gained national attention when the Huffington Post featured the exhibit earlier this month.

The exhibition will be on view at the Baltimore Museum of Art until Nov. 15, 2015. More information is available here.


#SayHerName: Teaching Young Girls to be Politically Conscious

sndblandOctober 15, 2015 – Segment 2

The plight of Black women who suffer violence and discrimination at the hands of the police, has largely been ignored, by the mainstream media and activists alike.  As recent events, particularly the July 13th death of Sandra Bland in police custody, have brought these issues to the fore, we steer our  conversation to how parents and educators are incorporating the living history of the Baltimore Uprising, #BlackLivesMatter and #SayHerName into lessons for their children and students, especially young girls of color. Sharing their thoughts are: Lisa Gray, Assistant Director of Student Life for Cultural and Spiritual Diversity at UMBC; and Dr. Anika Simpson, Associate Professor of Philosophy and Religious Studies and Coordinator of Women and Gender Studies Program at Morgan State University.


Justice or Else: Reflections on the 20th Anniversary of the Million Man March

October 13, 2015 – Segment 3Justice_OR_Else_255x360

Our panel reflects on the Million Man March 2o years on, and the role of the millennials in the modern movement.

Our panel of guests:  Malaika Aminata Clements, Morgan State University Print Journalism graduate and freelance life experiencer; Meshelle the Indie Mom of Comedy, former Open Society Institute-Baltimore Community Fellow and Founder of Goaldiggers, the Sankofa Project; Farajii Muhammad, Host of Listen Up! on WEAA 88.9-FM and member of the Nation of Islam; and Minister Carlos Muhammad, Baltimore representative for Minister Louis Farrakhan and Student Minister for Muhammad Mosque Number 6 in Baltimore.


Parenting: Talking To Your Children About Race

blmApril 13, 2015 – Segment 2

This week is the Spring Membership Drive for WEAA, and we have a lineup of great programs and great premiums! Please call into our show this week between 10 AM and noon eastern to make a pledge–410.319.8888, or pledge online here.

Our panel speaks about parenting and talking to children about race. The guests are: Dr. Karsonya “Kaye” Whitehead, Assistant Professor of Communication and Affiliate Assistant Professor of African and African American Studies at Loyola University Maryland and author of Letters to My Black Sons: Raising Boys in a Post-Racial AmericaDr. Roni Ellington, Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at Morgan State University; and Dr. Tara Mundell, mental health specialist, clinical psychologist and author of Let’s Talk About It, a book for children aimed at inspiring young, brilliant minds to build their self-esteem and confidence.


Philosophers’ Roundtable: Race & Class In The United States

protestApril 6, 2015 – Segment 2

We host a discussion about race and class in the U.S. with Dr. Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, Assistant Professor in Princeton University’s Center for African American Studies; and A. Adar Ayira, Project Manager of the More in the Middle Campaign for Associated Black Charities and facilitator and analyst at Baltimore Racial Justice Action, a program of Fusion Partnerships.


Baltimore’s Race Problems: Part 2

fergMarch 18, 2015 – Segment 2

We continue our discussion on the topic of race and racism in Baltimore, focusing on practical solutions. Our panel of guests includes: Dr. Roni Ellington, Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at Morgan State University; Roberto Alejandro, reporter for Baltimore’s Afro-American newspaper; Dr. Lawrence Brown, public health consultant and Assistant Professor of Public Health in the School of Community Health and Policy at Morgan State University; Michael Scott, Chief Equity Officer/President/Co-Founder of Equity Matters; and Dr. Tara Bynum, Assistant Professor in the Department of English at Towson University.


Baltimore’s Race Problems: Part 1

battsMarch 17, 2015 – Segment 2

Do you think Baltimore has a race problem? An article in the Baltimore Sun this past weekend indicates that Baltimore leaders agree: City has a race problemWe discuss it with: Dr. Lawrence Brown, public health consultant and Assistant Professor of Public Health in the School of Community Health and Policy at Morgan State University; community activist Kim Trueheart; Michael Eugene Johnson, Executive Director of the Paul Robeson Institute for Social Change; and Roberto Alejandro, reporter for Baltimore’s Afro-American newspaper.


Philosophers’ Roundtable: Race & Class In The United States

protestMarch 12, 2015 – Segment 4

We host a discussion and debate about race and class in the U.S. with Dr. Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, Assistant Professor in Princeton University’s Center for African American Studies; and A. Adar Ayira, Project Manager of the More in the Middle Campaign for Associated Black Charities and facilitator and analyst at Baltimore Racial Justice Action, a program of Fusion Partnerships.


Islamophobia in the US In The Wake Of Fatal North Carolina Shooting

ncFebruary 12, 2015 – Segment 2

In light of Tuesday’s fatal shootings of three young Muslims near the University of North Carolina, we examine Islamophobia in America, with: Imam Earl El-Amin of the Muslim Community Cultural Center of Baltimore;  Zainab Chaudry, CAIR Maryland Outreach Manager for the Council on American-Islamic Relations; and theRev. Dr. Heber Brown, community activist, pastor of Pleasant Hope Baptist Church and Executive Director of Orita’s Cross Freedom School.

 


Overlooked and Underreported: NAACP Bombing in Colorado Springs and The Shooting of Tamir Rice

krdo explosion investigation_1420575621446_12246706_ver1.0_640_480January 13, 2015 – Segment 2

Marc sits down with Stephen A. Crockett Jr., Associate Editor of News at The Root; and Dr. Karsonya “Kaye” Whitehead, Assistant Professor of Communication and Affiliate Assistant Professor of African and African American Studies at Loyola University Maryland, to discuss the media coverage of the bombing outside the Colorado Springs NAACP offices and the fatal shooting of 12-year-old Tamir Rice, who was shot by a Cleveland police officer whilst playing with a toy gun.


Philosophers’ Roundtable: Predictions About The Political, Cultural & Social Changes Of 2015

FERGUSON, MO - AUGUST 12:  Demonstrators protest the killing of teenager Michael Brown on August 12, 2014 in Ferguson, Missouri. Brown was shot and killed by a police officer on Saturday in the St. Louis suburb of Ferguson. Ferguson has experienced two days of violent protests since the killing but, tonight's protest was peaceful.  (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)January 5, 2015 – Segment 4

We will host our first Philosophers’ Roundtable of 2015. Our panel of guests includes: Dr. Lester Spence, Associate Professor of Political Science and Africana Studies at Johns Hopkins University, Center for Emerging Media Scholar-in-Residence, and author of Stare in the Darkness: The Limits of Hip-Hop and Black Politics; Dr. Desiree Melton, Associate Professor of Philosophy at Notre Dame of Maryland University; and Dr. Joe Pettit, Associate Professor of Philosophy and Religious Studies Advisor at Morgan State University.

 


Beyond Ferguson: Moving Towards Societal Change & Talking To Kids About Race

african-american-kidsDecember 17, 2014 – Segment 2

We host a special discussion on lessons from Ferguson and practical advice for parents on how to talk with their children about race and societal change.

With: the Rev. Dr. Heber Brown, community activist, pastor of Pleasant Hope Baptist Church and Executive Director of Orisha’s Cross Freedom School; Dr. Kimberly Moffitt, Associate Professor of American Studies at University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) and co-editor of Blackberries and Redbones: Critical Articulations of Black Hair/Body Politics in Africana Communities; and Dr. Karsonya “Kaye” Whitehead, Assistant Professor of Communication and Affiliate Assistant Professor of African and African American Studies at Loyola University Maryland, and author of Notes from a Colored Girl: The Civil War Pocket Diaries of Emile Frances Davis and the forthcoming Letters to My Black Sons: Raising Boys in a Post-Racial America.

 


Sound Bites: Where’s The Diversity in the Environmental Movement? | Diverse Legal Concerns for MD Agriculture

protestincineratorDecember 9, 2014 – Segment 4

It’s a brand new episode of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our future. The first segment springs from an article written for The Bay Journal by Whitney Pipkin: “The ‘green ceiling’: Environmental organizations lack diversity.” Pipkin’s article examines”The State of Diversity in Environmental Organizations,” a report issued by the Green 2.0 working group.

Our panel of guests includes: Whitney Pipkin, writer on food, agriculture and the environment for The Bay Journal, Fellow of the Institute for Journalists of Natural resources and blogger at thinkabouteat.com; Fred Tutman, Patuxent Riverkeeper; Dr. Dorceta Taylor,  Professor, Environmental Justice Field of Studies Coordinator, Past Chair of the Environment and Technology Section of the American Sociological Association at the University of Michigan, and author of the report we are discussing and also Toxic Communities:  Environmental Racism, Industrial Pollution, and Residential Mobility; and Jacqueline Patterson, Director of the NAACP Climate Justice Initiative.

We close out the show with a look at a recent report on top legal concerns for Maryland’s agricultural community. We will talk with the report’s co-authors: Paul Goeringer, Extension Legal Specialist in the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources at the University of Maryland; and Dr. Stephan Tubene, Co-Project Director, Outreach for Socially Disadvantaged Farmers and Ranchers Project.


Police Violence & The Legal System’s Failure To Respond To Ferguson, NY & Cleveland

protestDecember 8, 2014 – Segment 2

We host a panel discussion on race and racism in the U.S., specifically looking at police violence and the legal system’s failure to respond to civilian killings in Ferguson, New York and Cleveland with: A. Adar Ayira, Project Manager of the More in the Middle Campaign for Associated Black Charities and facilitator and analyst at Baltimore Racial Justice Action, a program of Fusion Partnerships; and Doug Colbert, Professor of Law at the University of Maryland Carey Law School.


The Whiteness Project: Exploring How White Americans Experience Their Ethnicity

The Whiteness ProjectOctober 30, 2014 – Segment 3

We take a look at The Whiteness Project, an interactive investigation into how Americans who identify themselves as “white” experience their ethnicity.

We talk with Whitney Dow, Founder of Two Tone Productions and Director/Producer ofThe Whiteness ProjectMarco Williams, Associate Arts Professor at the Kanbar Institute of Film & Television, Tisch School of the Arts, New York University; A. Adar Ayira, project manager of the More in the Middle Campaign for Associated Black Charities and facilitator and analyst at Baltimore Racial Justice Action, a program of Fusion Partnerships; and Sarah Tooley, member of Baltimore Racial Justice Action.


Racial Divides in Baltimore’s Art World

siloOctober 20, 2014 – Segment 3

We host a panel on the racial divides in the artistic world in Baltimore, inspired by articles in last week’s Baltimore City Paper‘s 2014 Fall Arts Guide. With: Kalima Young, Director of the Baltimore Art + Justice Project, a project of the Office of Community Engagement at MICA; Baynard Woods, Senior Editor for the Baltimore City Paper; Deana Haggag, Director of The Contemporary Museum in Baltimore; and Mia Loving, community organizer, entrepreneur, mother and wife.

LINK

 


Baltimore City: Breaking Your Heart?

Baltimore SkylineOctober 6, 2014 – Segment 3

We listen back to an archive edition of the Marc Steiner Show from last year where we discussed the article, “Baltimore City, You’re Breaking My Heart” and the many responses to it. That article recently took the title for Baltimore City Paper’s Best White Whine” of 2014. We hear from: Adam Jackson, CEO of Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle; Tim Barnett, founder of Baltimore Bike Party and author of a response to the aforementioned article, titled “Baltimore City: You’re Not Breaking My Heart. I’m not leaving”; Katie Long, Program Director and Hispanic Liaison of the Friends of Patterson Park; Hasdai Westbrook, Partner at ChangingMedia, a digital agency devoted to social change, and author of the blog post, “To #SaveBaltimore, Embrace the Wire”; Dr. Tara Bynum, assistant professor in the Department of English at Towson University; and Bobby Marvin Holmes, Youth Advocate for Baltimore Youth Advocate Programs, Inc. (BYAP) and Producer of Live Young Blood, a documentary focused on the struggle to end youth violence.

LINK


Disproportionate Victimization of African Americans

morganAugust 28, 2014 – Segment 2

We discuss a teach-in and rally that will be held Thursday at Morgan State University. The event, which focuses on the disproportionate victimization of African Americans, will happen from 11:00am – 1:00pm in Jenkins 104 and the Outdoor Amphitheater. Our guests are: Dr. Jared BallAssociate Professor at Morgan State University’s School of Global Journalism and Communication, Co-Editor of Malcolm X: A Lie of Reinvention, and author of I Mix What I Like: A Mixtape Manifesto (imixwhatilike.org); and Dr. Natasha Pratt-Harris,Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at Morgan State University.

LINK


Donald Sterling’s Racist Comments

donald-sterlingApril 28, 2014 – Segment 4

We discuss Clippers’ owner Donald Sterling’s racist statements about African Americans, released last Friday. We’re joined by Ali Danois, Senior Editor of Bounce Magazine and co-host of the Blacktop Xchange Sports Report on WEAA; and Dr. Lester Spence, Center for Emerging Media Scholar-in-Residence and Associate Professor of Political Science and Africana Studies at Johns Hopkins University, who wrote this piece on Sterling.

LINK


Where Are The People Of Color In Children’s Books?

kidsbooksMarch 20, 2014 – Segment 2

Last week in the New York Times’ Sunday Review, an opinion piece by children’s book author Walter Dean Myers was published, titled “Where Are the People of Color in Children’s Books?” To answer the question, we talk to: Dr. Charles Johnson, National Book Award-winning novelist and scholar, who co-authored (with his daughter Elisheba) the children’s book Bending Time: The Adventures of Emery Jones, Boy Science Wonder; Tonya Bolden, award-winning author of over twenty books for young readers and adults, including Searching for Sarah Rector: The Richest Black Girl in America; and Deborah Taylor, School and Student Services Coordinator for the Enoch Pratt Free Library in Baltimore.

LINK


Craig Steven Wilder On “Ebony And Ivy”

Craig Wilder, author of the new book "Ebony and Ivy: Race, Slavery and the Troubled History of American's Universities" poses for a portrait on the Massachusetts Institute of Technology campus in Cambridge, Massachusetts on October 7, 2013.February 19, 2014 – Segment 4

Craig Steven Wilder, author of Ebony & Ivy: The Secret History of How Slavery Helped Build America’s Elite Colleges, joins us to talk about the legacy of slavery in the Ivy League.

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Forget Duck Dynasty: There Are Important Civil Rights Battles To Fight

IFILLJanuary 6, 2014 – Segment 3

Sherrilyn Ifill, President and Director-Counsel of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, joins us to talk about how media hype around bigoted comments made by public figures can distract us from focusing on important civil rights struggles. Last week Ifill wrote an article for The Root: “Forget Duck Dynasty: There Are Important Civil Rights Battles To Fight.”

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The Racial Politics Of Hip Hop

DDmDecember 2, 2013 – Segment 4

Center for Emerging Media’s Cultural Editor, Blues & Gospel singer Lea Gilmore joins us for a conversation on the racial politics of Hip Hop, Soul and Rock & Roll, in light of last week’s controversial American Music Awards. Baltimore-based rapper DDm also joins us.

 

 

LINK


Cultural News Roundtable

rastawigOctober 29, 2013 – Segment 2

We host a cultural roundtable, where the topics will range from racist Halloween costumes to art, film and music. Our guests will include: Adar Ayira, project manager of the More in the Middle Campaign for Associated Black Charities and facilitator and analyst at Baltimore Racial Justice Action, a program of Fusion Partnerships; Michelle Antionette aka LOVE the Poet, poet, performance artist, and musician; and Amrita Kaur Dang, better known as Ami Dang, a South Asian-American musician from Baltimore.

LINK


Dedrick Muhammad

Dedrick-MuhammadOctober 25, 2013 – Segment 4

Dedrick Muhammad, Senior Director of the Economic Department and Executive Director of the Financial Freedom Center at the NAACP, joins us to provide commentary on a study released last week out of Stanford University, finding that the “segregation of families by socioeconomic status” — i.e., the rich living among the rich and the poor living among the poor — has increased rapidly in recent decades.

LINK


Rinku Sen On The Racist Mind

Rinku SenSeptember 9, 2013 – Segment 3

In our continuing analysis of what the murder of Trayvon Martin means for America, we speak with Rinku Sen, President of the Applied Research Center and publisher of Colorlines, who recently wrote an article titled “The Racist Mind.”

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Commentary On Zimmerman Verdict

matthew.simmermon-gomesAugust 7, 2013  – Segment 3

We continue our series of commentaries on the Zimmerman verdict, with Matthew Simmermon-Gomes, Master of Letters in Renaissance and Early Modern Studies and student in the Centre for Early Modern Studies at the University of Aberdeen. He wrote a blog post titled “An Open Letter to Whites About the Black Community and the Trayvon Martin Case” which you can read here.

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Zimmerman Verdict Commentary – Mychal Denzel Smith

trayvon-protestJuly 31, 2013 – Segment 2

We begin a series of commentaries on the aftermath of the Zimmerman verdict. We are joined by Mychal Denzel Smith, blogger at TheNation.com and Knobler Fellow at the Nation Institute, who wrote recently wrote a piece called Our Lives on the Line in which he asked “how long are we supposed to remain calm when the laws we are called on to respect are an open assault on our humanity?”

We’re also joined by Dr. Lester Spence, Associate Professor of Political Science and Africana Studies at Johns Hopkins University, and Center for Emerging Media Scholar in Residence.

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Supreme Court Decision On Voting Rights

voteJune 26, 2013 – Segment 1

We discuss this week’s Supreme Court decision striking down key provisions of the Voting Rights Act. The ruling allows nine states, mostly in the South, to change their election laws without advance federal approval. Joining us for the discussion are:

  • Ari Berman, contributing writer for The Nation magazine;
  • Aderson Francois, Associate Professor of Law at Howard University School of Law;
  • Michael Higginbotham, Wilson H. Elkins Professor of Law at the University of Baltimore School of Law.

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Sound Bites: Malik Yakini And Labeling Genetically Engineered Foods

MalikYakiniMay 2, 2013

It’s a new episode of Sound Bites. First, we speak with Malik Yakini, Executive Director of the Detroit Black Community Food Security Network and founder of D-Town Farm, an urban farm in Detroit. We discuss racism in the food system and the food movement, as well as his work fighting for social justice, food equity, and food security for the people of Detroit.
At 6:30, Sound Bites continues with a debate over recently proposed federal legislation which would mandate the labeling of genetically engineered foods. We’ll hear a debate between Patty Lovera, Assistant Director of Food and Water Watch, and Thomas Redick, Principal at The Global Environmental Ethics Counsel, a law practice addressing product liability prevention, where he represents the US Soybean Export Council and the United Soybean Board, and co-editor of Thwarting Consumer Choice: The Case Against Mandatory Labeling for Genetically Modified Foods.

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Race And The Media Coverage Of The Boston Bombing

MediaApril 24, 2013 – Segment 2

We have a conversation about the ways racism has affected media discourse around the attacks on the Boston marathon last week. We speak with Edward Wyckoff Williams, author, columnist, and regular contributor to The Root, Huffington Post, and Salon.com, and Sally Kohn, activist, writer, regular contributor to Colorlines, and political analyst for Fox News. Click HERE to check out Edward Wyckoff Williams’s article. Click HERE to read Sally Kohn’s piece.

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Ghosts of Jim Crow: Ending Racism In Post-Racial America

Michael HigginbothamApril 11, 2013 – Hour 1

This week is the WEAA Spring Fund Drive, so tune in for compelling topics and wonderful premiums! Now is your opportunity to support the station you have come to love: WEAA, THE Voice of the Community! Call 410-319-8888 to make your pledge of support during the show.

Michael Higginbotham, Wilson H. Elkins Professor of Law at the University of Baltimore School of Law, joins us to speak about his latest book, Ghosts of Jim Crow: Ending Racism in Post-Racial America. The book explores how laws and systemic prejudice have maintained racial hierarchy and separation, both historically and today.

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