The Marc Steiner Show

Talking Peace with Iraq War Veteran Paul K. Chappell

Paul ChappellSeptember 18, 2014 – Segment 5

We close out the show with Paul K. Chappell, author, speaker, Iraq War veteran, and Peace Leadership Director at the Nuclear Age Peace Foundation.

Chappell will be the keynote speaker Thursday September 18 at noon at the Central Maryland Ecumenical Council’s Fall Luncheon Series.

LINK

Written by Marc Steiner

Marc Steiner

The Marc Steiner Show airs Monday thru Friday from 10AM to Noon on WEAA 88.9 FM. The show covers the topics that matter, engaging real voices, from Charm City to Cairo and beyond. Call us at 410.319.8888 or email us to participate live in the show, or share your comments on our site! Aren’t in Baltimore but want to listen? Stream the show live.


Comments

  1. Has anyone investigated the Cytochrome P450 2D6 link to the high suicide/violence rates in the Iraq vets, as well as the populace? Keeping this on the
    QT supplies the gun control advocates with a ready volume of examples to draw from for their argument. If you supply an email address that accommodates attachments, can send further info

    Folks…Here is the long awaited link to Dr. Yolande Lucire’s new published study.
    (see below). I have also attached an extensive list of the drugs that need 2D6 to metabolize. And if you or your family/friends are prescribed these drugs and are going bonkers…I suggest you test for 2D6. If you don’t have the 2D6 metabolic pathway to detoxify…you will be dead or crazy soon. Eileen

    Here is part of my “laymen’s” letter to the Drug Czar in Iowa. So you can get the idea of what is being uncovered.

    Yolande’s study is very interesting reading. Other than the science, she has testimony of the homicidal person’s who are missing 2D6 on how they experienced this toxic shock that made them commit heinous crimes.

    SUBSTRATES
    1A2 2B6 2C8 2C9 2C19 2D6 2E1 3A4,5,7
    amitriptyline
    caffeine
    clomipramine
    clozapine
    cyclobenzaprine
    estradiol
    fluvoxamine
    haloperidol
    imipramine N-DeMe
    mexilletine
    naproxen
    olanzapine
    ondansetron
    phenacetin
    acetaminophenNAPQI
    propranolol
    riluzole
    ropivacaine
    tacrine
    theophylline
    tizanidine
    verapamil
    (R)warfarin
    zileuton
    zolmitriptan
    bupropion
    cyclophosphamide
    efavirenz
    ifosfamide
    methadone
    paclitaxel
    torsemide
    amodiaquine
    cerivastatin
    repaglinide
    NSAIDs:
    diclofenac
    ibuprofen
    lornoxicam
    meloxicam
    S-naproxenNor
    piroxicam
    suprofen
    Oral Hypoglycemic
    Agents:
    tolbutamide
    glipizide
    Angiotensin II
    Blockers:
    losartan
    irbesartan
    Sulfonylureas:
    glyburide
    glibenclamide
    glipizide
    glimepiride
    tolbutamide
    amitriptyline
    celecoxib
    fluoxetine
    fluvastatin
    glyburide
    nateglinide
    phenytoin-4-OH2
    rosiglitazone
    tamoxifen
    torsemide
    S-warfarin
    Proton Pump
    Inhibitors:
    lansoprazole
    omeprazole
    pantoprazole
    rabeprazole
    Anti-epileptics:
    diazepamNor
    phenytoin(O)
    S-mephenytoin
    phenobarbitone
    amitriptyline
    carisoprodol
    citalopram
    chloramphenicol
    clomipramine
    cyclophosphamide
    hexobarbital
    imipramine N-DeME
    indomethacin
    R-mephobarbital
    moclobemide
    nelfinavir
    nilutamide
    primidone
    progesterone
    proguanil
    propranolol
    teniposide
    R-warfarin8-OH
    Beta Blockers:
    carvedilol
    S-metoprolol
    propafenone
    timolol
    Antidepressants:
    amitriptyline
    clomipramine
    desipramine
    imipramine
    paroxetine
    Antipsychotics:
    haloperidol
    perphenazine
    risperidone9OH
    thioridazine
    zuclopenthixol
    alprenolol
    amphetamine
    aripiprazole
    atomoxetine
    bufuralol1
    chlorpheniramine
    chlorpromazine
    codeine (O-desMe)
    debrisoquine
    dexfenfluramine
    dextromethorphan
    duloxetine
    encainide
    flecainide
    fluoxetine
    fluvoxamine
    lidocaine
    metoclopramide
    methoxyamphetamine
    mexilletine
    minaprine
    nebivolol
    nortriptyline
    ondansetron
    oxycodone
    perhexiline
    phenacetin
    phenformin
    promethazine
    propranolol
    sparteine
    tamoxifen
    tramadol
    venlafaxine
    Anesthetics:
    enflurane
    halothane
    isoflurane
    methoxyflurane
    sevoflurane
    acetaminophen
    NAPQI
    aniline2
    benzene
    chlorzoxazone
    ethanol
    N,N-dimethyl
    formamide
    theophylline
    8-OH
    Macrolide antibiotics:
    clarithromycin
    erythromycin (not
    3A5)
    NOT azithromycin
    telithromycin
    Anti-arrhythmics:
    quinidine3OH (not
    3A5)
    Benzodiazepines:
    alprazolam
    diazepam3OH
    midazolam
    triazolam
    Immune Modulators:
    cyclosporine
    tacrolimus (FK506)
    HIV Antivirals:
    indinavir
    nelfinavir
    ritonavir
    saquinavir
    Prokinetic:
    cisapride
    Antihistamines:
    astemizole
    chlorpheniramine
    terfenadine
    Calcium Channel
    Blockers:
    amlodipine
    diltiazem
    felodipine
    lercanidipine
    nifedipine2
    nisoldipine
    nitrendipine
    verapamil
    HMG CoA Reductase
    Inhibitors:
    atorvastatin
    cerivastatin
    lovastatin
    NOT pravastatin
    simvastatin
    Steroid 6beta-OH:
    estradiol
    hydrocortisone
    progesterone
    testosterone
    Miscellaneous:
    alfentanyl
    aprepitant
    aripiprazole
    buspirone
    cafergot
    caffeineTMU
    cilostazol
    cocaine
    codeine-Ndemethylation
    dapsone
    dexamethasone
    dextromethorphan
    docetaxel
    domperidone
    eplerenone
    fentanyl
    finasteride
    gleevec
    haloperidol
    irinotecan
    LAAM
    lidocaine
    methadone
    nateglinide
    ondansetron
    pimozide
    propranolol
    quetiapine
    quinine
    risperidone
    NOT rosuvastatin
    salmeterol
    sildenafil
    sirolimus
    tamoxifen
    taxol
    terfenadine
    trazodone
    vincristine
    zaleplon
    ziprasidone
    zolpidem
    INHIBITORS
    1A2 2B6 2C8 2C9 2C19 2D6 2E1 3A4,5,7
    fluvoxamine
    ciprofloxacin
    cimetidine
    amiodarone
    fluoroquinolones
    furafylline
    interferon
    methoxsalen
    mibefradil
    thiotepa
    ticlopidine
    gemfibrozil
    trimethoprim
    glitazones
    montelukast
    quercetin
    fluconazole
    amiodarone
    fenofibrate
    fluvastatin
    fluvoxamine
    isoniazid
    lovastatin
    phenylbutazone
    probenicid
    sertraline
    sulfamethoxazole
    sulfaphenazole
    teniposide
    voriconazole
    zafirlukast
    PPIs:
    lansoprazole
    omeprazole
    pantoprazole
    rabeprazole
    chloramphenicol
    cimetidine
    felbamate
    fluoxetine
    fluvoxamine
    indomethacin
    ketoconazole
    modafinil
    oxcarbazepine
    probenicid
    ticlopidine
    topiramate
    bupropion
    fluoxetine
    paroxetine
    quinidine
    duloxetine
    terbinafine
    amiodarone
    cimetidine
    sertraline
    celecoxib
    chlorpheniramine
    chlorpromazine
    citalopram
    clemastine
    clomipramine
    cocaine
    diphenhydramine
    doxepin
    doxorubicin
    escitalopram
    halofantrine
    histamine H1
    receptor antagonists
    hydroxyzine
    levomepromazine
    methadone
    metoclopramide
    mibefradil
    midodrine
    moclobemide
    perphenazine
    ranitidine
    red-haloperidol
    ritonavir
    ticlopidine
    tripelennamine
    diethyldithiocarbamate
    disulfiram
    HIV Antivirals:
    indinavir
    nelfinavir
    ritonavir
    clarithromycin
    itraconazole
    ketoconazole
    nefazodone
    saquinavir
    telithromycin
    aprepitant
    erythromycin
    fluconazole
    grapefruit juice
    verapamil
    diltiazem
    cimetidine
    amiodarone
    NOT azithromycin
    chloramphenicol
    delaviridine
    diethyldithiocarbamate
    fluvoxamine
    gestodene
    imatinib
    mibefradil
    mifepristone
    norfloxacin
    norfluoxetine
    star fruit
    voriconazole
    INDUCERS
    1A2 2B6 2C8 2C9 2C19 2D6 2E1 3A4,5,7
    broccoli
    brussel sprouts
    char-grilled meat
    insulin
    methylcholanthrene
    modafinil
    nafcillin
    beta-naphthoflavone
    omeprazole
    tobacco
    phenobarbital
    rifampin
    rifampin rifampin
    secobarbital
    carbamazepine
    norethindrone
    NOT pentobarbital
    prednisone
    rifampin
    dexamethasone
    rifampin
    ethanol
    isoniazid
    HIV Antivirals:
    efavirenz
    nevirapine
    barbiturates
    carbamazepine
    efavirenz
    glucocorticoids
    modafinil
    nevirapine
    oxcarbazepine
    phenobarbital
    phenytoin
    pioglitazone
    rifabutin
    rifampin
    St. John’s wort
    troglitazone
    The entire content of this site is protected by International and United States of America copyright laws. © 2003
    Cytochrome P450 Drug Interaction Table
    http://www.drug-interactions.com

    A brief in laymen’s terms: The field of Pharmacogenetics and mental illness – Eileen Dannemann

    Since the identification of human genes via the genome project and Craig Venter’s genetic team, genetic scientists have identified the genetic pathway that metabolizes 25% (and perhaps as much as 50%) of all psyche drugs and street drugs. It is located on cytochrome P450. The segment on cytochrome P450 that metabolizes these drugs is referred to as 2D6.

    An efficient 2D6 metabolic pathway is absolutely required in order to metabolize more than 25%-50% of all psyche drugs and street drugs. What you need to know is that Polymorphism of cytochrome P450 is significant in the population. As much as 7-10% of Caucasians, (which may be an artificially reduced number) for example, are poor metabolizers or absent 2D6 activity; Because this segment of the population cannot metabolize street drugs or prescription drugs, the drugs accumulate causing toxicity, liver damage and psychotic behavior. This segment of the population is having adverse reactions to street and psyche drugs such that they are committing suicide and homicide, school shootings, using up special needs education, etc. As a result of the increased aberrant behavior due to being prescribed drugs or street drugs, without testing for the metabolic activity of the 2D6 gene, these poor metabolizers are historically administered higher and more lethal doses by the psychiatrists, thereby aggravating the problem. Becoming more mentally ill, homicidal and suicidal, the society is put at great risk.

    Dr. Yolande Lucire has just been published her research entitled “Antidepressant-induced akathisia-related homicides associated with diminishing mutations in metabolizing genes of the CyyP450 family in Pharmacogenomics and Personalized Medicine which I have attached as well as supplying this link: http://www.dovepress.com/articles.php?article_id=7993

    A limited demographic chart of affected demographics can be found at http://www.pharmacologyweekly.com/table-cyp2d6-genetic-polymorphisms-pharmacogenetics. A list of the drugs that need the 2D6 and other alleles can be found

    http://www.atforum.com/SiteRoot/pages/…/P450%20Drug%20Interactions.PDF

    Research on cytochrome 450 2D6 has been going on for over 15 years. However, the pharmaceutical stakeholders and their psychiatric partners have suppressed the field of pharmacogenetics by retarding education on the subject. Hence, general physicians and psychiatric interns are not taught the necessity to do simple precautionary genetic tests prior to prescribing psychiatric drugs. The question begs answering – why, when the population is experiencing an extraordinary rise in mental illness that this simple, inexpensive genetic test is not performed as standard of care? However, all competent psychiatrists who are current in their field (which they should be); familiar with psychiatric journals; go to conferences, etc. are aware of cytochrome 2D6 and the problem of drug interactions and 2D6.

    Yet they are not held accountable having wrongly prescribed drugs that are counter indicated and frankly, deadly, to those who do not have 2D6 gene activity. Despite science based evidence consistently garnered over a 15 year time period, genetic testing has not become standard of care.

    If this issue that all levels of races have a percentage of people with inactive 2D6 and thus were unable to detoxify prescription and street drugs; appearing psychotic were known to the public, the stakeholders would stand to lose billions and billions of dollars. Hence the suppression – until now!

    We are at the crest of a wave. The manufacturers are starting to put the cytochrome p450 2D6 information in their package inserts. This signals that the stakeholders can no longer keep this information suppressed.

    Antidepressant-induced akathisia-related homicides associated with diminishing mutations in metabolizing genes of the CYP450 family

    as it appears in “Pharmacogenomics and Personalized Medicine” here:

    http://www.dovepress.com/articles.php?article_id=7993.

    Thank you all for your support and scepticism,

    From Eileen Dannemann:

    Note that 2D6 and other metabolic pathways to metabolize psyche drugs is on the same cytochrome as glutathione…think about the implications re vaccines…No drugs, no vaccines for those indigo and crystal children who have evolved to an absent 2D6. Those born in the epoch of DRUGS…if gene tested…must not be vaccinated or use drugs without deadly consequences. It is good to know!!!

    For example, on the other hand 20% of Tanzanian Afrikans have evolved to have duplicate 2D6 because they eat a lot of herbs because it is hard to grow food. So, in essence they are constantly eating medicinal plants.

    Duplicate 2D6 makes them ULTRA metabolizers. Missing 2D6 means you can’t metabolize 25-50% of psyche and recreational drugs .

    Dr. Lucire will be in the United States in September if anyone wants to set up a radio or TV interview

    ———- Forwarded message ———-
    From: Yolande Lucire
    Date: Sat, Aug 6, 2011 at 6:59 PM
    Subject: Antidepressant-induced akathisia-related homicides associated with diminishing mutations in metabolizing genes of the CYP450 family
    To: Meryl Nass , Eileen Dannemann

    Dear friends, helpers supporters and sceptics,

    Here is our now published manuscript,

    Antidepressant-induced akathisia-related homicides associated with diminishing mutations in metabolizing genes of the CYP450 family

    as it appears in “Pharmacogenomics and Personalized Medicine” here:

    http://www.dovepress.com/articles.php?article_id=7993.

    Thank you all for your support and scepticism,

    Both were equally helpful.

    I believe that pharmacogenetics has been crucial here

    Please use the link

    Dr Yolande Lucire

    SUBSTRATES
    1A2 2B6 2C8 2C9 2C19 2D6 2E1 3A4,5,7
    amitriptyline
    caffeine
    clomipramine
    clozapine
    cyclobenzaprine
    estradiol
    fluvoxamine
    haloperidol
    imipramine N-DeMe
    mexilletine
    naproxen
    olanzapine
    ondansetron
    phenacetin
    acetaminophenNAPQI
    propranolol
    riluzole
    ropivacaine
    tacrine
    theophylline
    tizanidine
    verapamil
    (R)warfarin
    zileuton
    zolmitriptan
    bupropion
    cyclophosphamide
    efavirenz
    ifosfamide
    methadone
    paclitaxel
    torsemide
    amodiaquine
    cerivastatin
    repaglinide
    NSAIDs:
    diclofenac
    ibuprofen
    lornoxicam
    meloxicam
    S-naproxenNor
    piroxicam
    suprofen
    Oral Hypoglycemic
    Agents:
    tolbutamide
    glipizide
    Angiotensin II
    Blockers:
    losartan
    irbesartan
    Sulfonylureas:
    glyburide
    glibenclamide
    glipizide
    glimepiride
    tolbutamide
    amitriptyline
    celecoxib
    fluoxetine
    fluvastatin
    glyburide
    nateglinide
    phenytoin-4-OH2
    rosiglitazone
    tamoxifen
    torsemide
    S-warfarin
    Proton Pump
    Inhibitors:
    lansoprazole
    omeprazole
    pantoprazole
    rabeprazole
    Anti-epileptics:
    diazepamNor
    phenytoin(O)
    S-mephenytoin
    phenobarbitone
    amitriptyline
    carisoprodol
    citalopram
    chloramphenicol
    clomipramine
    cyclophosphamide
    hexobarbital
    imipramine N-DeME
    indomethacin
    R-mephobarbital
    moclobemide
    nelfinavir
    nilutamide
    primidone
    progesterone
    proguanil
    propranolol
    teniposide
    R-warfarin8-OH
    Beta Blockers:
    carvedilol
    S-metoprolol
    propafenone
    timolol
    Antidepressants:
    amitriptyline
    clomipramine
    desipramine
    imipramine
    paroxetine
    Antipsychotics:
    haloperidol
    perphenazine
    risperidone9OH
    thioridazine
    zuclopenthixol
    alprenolol
    amphetamine
    aripiprazole
    atomoxetine
    bufuralol1
    chlorpheniramine
    chlorpromazine
    codeine (O-desMe)
    debrisoquine
    dexfenfluramine
    dextromethorphan
    duloxetine
    encainide
    flecainide
    fluoxetine
    fluvoxamine
    lidocaine
    metoclopramide
    methoxyamphetamine
    mexilletine
    minaprine
    nebivolol
    nortriptyline
    ondansetron
    oxycodone
    perhexiline
    phenacetin
    phenformin
    promethazine
    propranolol
    sparteine
    tamoxifen
    tramadol
    venlafaxine
    Anesthetics:
    enflurane
    halothane
    isoflurane
    methoxyflurane
    sevoflurane
    acetaminophen
    NAPQI
    aniline2
    benzene
    chlorzoxazone
    ethanol
    N,N-dimethyl
    formamide
    theophylline
    8-OH
    Macrolide antibiotics:
    clarithromycin
    erythromycin (not
    3A5)
    NOT azithromycin
    telithromycin
    Anti-arrhythmics:
    quinidine3OH (not
    3A5)
    Benzodiazepines:
    alprazolam
    diazepam3OH
    midazolam
    triazolam
    Immune Modulators:
    cyclosporine
    tacrolimus (FK506)
    HIV Antivirals:
    indinavir
    nelfinavir
    ritonavir
    saquinavir
    Prokinetic:
    cisapride
    Antihistamines:
    astemizole
    chlorpheniramine
    terfenadine
    Calcium Channel
    Blockers:
    amlodipine
    diltiazem
    felodipine
    lercanidipine
    nifedipine2
    nisoldipine
    nitrendipine
    verapamil
    HMG CoA Reductase
    Inhibitors:
    atorvastatin
    cerivastatin
    lovastatin
    NOT pravastatin
    simvastatin
    Steroid 6beta-OH:
    estradiol
    hydrocortisone
    progesterone
    testosterone
    Miscellaneous:
    alfentanyl
    aprepitant
    aripiprazole
    buspirone
    cafergot
    caffeineTMU
    cilostazol
    cocaine
    codeine-Ndemethylation
    dapsone
    dexamethasone
    dextromethorphan
    docetaxel
    domperidone
    eplerenone
    fentanyl
    finasteride
    gleevec
    haloperidol
    irinotecan
    LAAM
    lidocaine
    methadone
    nateglinide
    ondansetron
    pimozide
    propranolol
    quetiapine
    quinine
    risperidone
    NOT rosuvastatin
    salmeterol
    sildenafil
    sirolimus
    tamoxifen
    taxol
    terfenadine
    trazodone
    vincristine
    zaleplon
    ziprasidone
    zolpidem
    INHIBITORS
    1A2 2B6 2C8 2C9 2C19 2D6 2E1 3A4,5,7
    fluvoxamine
    ciprofloxacin
    cimetidine
    amiodarone
    fluoroquinolones
    furafylline
    interferon
    methoxsalen
    mibefradil
    thiotepa
    ticlopidine
    gemfibrozil
    trimethoprim
    glitazones
    montelukast
    quercetin
    fluconazole
    amiodarone
    fenofibrate
    fluvastatin
    fluvoxamine
    isoniazid
    lovastatin
    phenylbutazone
    probenicid
    sertraline
    sulfamethoxazole
    sulfaphenazole
    teniposide
    voriconazole
    zafirlukast
    PPIs:
    lansoprazole
    omeprazole
    pantoprazole
    rabeprazole
    chloramphenicol
    cimetidine
    felbamate
    fluoxetine
    fluvoxamine
    indomethacin
    ketoconazole
    modafinil
    oxcarbazepine
    probenicid
    ticlopidine
    topiramate
    bupropion
    fluoxetine
    paroxetine
    quinidine
    duloxetine
    terbinafine
    amiodarone
    cimetidine
    sertraline
    celecoxib
    chlorpheniramine
    chlorpromazine
    citalopram
    clemastine
    clomipramine
    cocaine
    diphenhydramine
    doxepin
    doxorubicin
    escitalopram
    halofantrine
    histamine H1
    receptor antagonists
    hydroxyzine
    levomepromazine
    methadone
    metoclopramide
    mibefradil
    midodrine
    moclobemide
    perphenazine
    ranitidine
    red-haloperidol
    ritonavir
    ticlopidine
    tripelennamine
    diethyldithiocarbamate
    disulfiram
    HIV Antivirals:
    indinavir
    nelfinavir
    ritonavir
    clarithromycin
    itraconazole
    ketoconazole
    nefazodone
    saquinavir
    telithromycin
    aprepitant
    erythromycin
    fluconazole
    grapefruit juice
    verapamil
    diltiazem
    cimetidine
    amiodarone
    NOT azithromycin
    chloramphenicol
    delaviridine
    diethyldithiocarbamate
    fluvoxamine
    gestodene
    imatinib
    mibefradil
    mifepristone
    norfloxacin
    norfluoxetine
    star fruit
    voriconazole
    INDUCERS
    1A2 2B6 2C8 2C9 2C19 2D6 2E1 3A4,5,7
    broccoli
    brussel sprouts
    char-grilled meat
    insulin
    methylcholanthrene
    modafinil
    nafcillin
    beta-naphthoflavone
    omeprazole
    tobacco
    phenobarbital
    rifampin
    rifampin rifampin
    secobarbital
    carbamazepine
    norethindrone
    NOT pentobarbital
    prednisone
    rifampin
    dexamethasone
    rifampin
    ethanol
    isoniazid
    HIV Antivirals:
    efavirenz
    nevirapine
    barbiturates
    carbamazepine
    efavirenz
    glucocorticoids
    modafinil
    nevirapine
    oxcarbazepine
    phenobarbital
    phenytoin
    pioglitazone
    rifabutin
    rifampin
    St. John’s wort
    troglitazone
    The entire content of this site is protected by International and United States of America copyright laws. © 2003
    Cytochrome P450 Drug Interaction Table
    http://www.drug-interactions.com

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