The Marc Steiner Show

May 12: This Day In History

rapandstokelyMay 12, 2014  – Segment 1

Marc shares some of the events that happened on this day in history, including  H. Rap Brown replacing Stokely Carmichael as chairman of Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, a bill being sent to President Clinton making it a Federal Crime to block access to an abortion clinic or to use force or threats against people using these facilities, and Bob Dylan walking out of rehearsals for the Ed Sullivan show after being told he couldn’t perform his song Talking John Birch Paranoid Blues due to it mocking the US military and segregation.

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On this day in history:        

1858: Comanche Chief Iron Jacket (Po-hebitsquash) is killed in a fight with Texas Rangers on the Canadian River.

1860: A battle in the Paiute War takes place in Nevada at Big Bend in the valley of the Truckee River. Major William Ormsby’s Nevada militia are attacked by Paiutes under war Chief Numaga.

1941 – Konrad Zuse presents the Z3, the world’s first working programmable, fully automatic computer, in Berlin.

1942 – The Holocaust: 1,500 Jews are sent to gas chambers in Auschwitz.

1949 – The Soviet Union lifts its blockade of Berlin.

1958 – Summit Meeting of National Negro Leaders called for stepped up campaign against discrimination and desegregation. President Eisenhower was sharply criticized for a speech which, in effect, urged the leaders to “be patient” in seeking full citizenship rights.

1963: Bob Dylan walked out of rehearsals for the US TV Ed Sullivan show after being told he couldn’t perform his song Talking John Birch Paranoid Blues due to it mocking the US military and segregation. CBS officials asked Dylan to substitute it for another song, but the singer reportedly said: ‘No, this is what I want to do. If I can’t play my song, I’d rather not appear on the show’.

1965: The Rolling Stones recorded ‘(I Can’t Get No), Satisfaction’ at RCA Hollywood studios. Keith Richards had come up with the guitar riff in the middle of the night a week earlier. It gave the band their first number 1 single in the US.

1966: Hundreds of thousands of College and University Students are preparing to sit the Draft Deferment Test , The test is a way for them to convince the Draft Board that they would serve the nation better in the quiet of the Classrooms than in the Jungles of Vietnam.

1967 – H. Rap Brown replaced Stokely Carmichael as chairman of Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.

1967: ‘Are You Experienced’, the debut album by Jimi Hendrix was released in the UK. Hendrix also played a gig at the Bluesville Club, Manor House in London on this day.

1970 – Race riot, Augusta, Georgia. Six Blacks were killed. Authorities said five of the victims were shot by police.

1973: The Pentagon Papers trial which was focussed on THE FIRST AMENDMENT and The Governments Authority to control information and the Publics access to that information has now ended and with a verdict of NOT GUILTY for the defendants Daniel Ellsburg and Anthony J Russo Jr, but many of the answers given by defendants and testimony by witnesses raise many more questions concerning the Watergate Affair. (This eventually led to Impeachment proceedings against President Nixon) Daniel Ellsberg was a contributor but gave most of the Pentagon Papers to New York Times reporter Neil Sheehan, with Ellsberg’s friend Anthony Russo assisting in their copying.

1984: Lionel Richie started a two week run at No.1 on the US singles chart with ‘Hello’ his second US solo No.1, also a No.1 in the UK.

1994: A bill has been sent to President Clinton making it a Federal Crime to block access to an abortion clinic or to use force or threats against people using these facilities. This is in response to over 1000 acts of violence at these facilities in the last 20 years.

2002 – Former US President Jimmy Carter arrives in Cuba for a five-day visit with Fidel Castro becoming the first President of the United States, in or out of office, to visit the island since Castro’s 1959 revolution.

2008 – U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement conducts the largest-ever raid of a workplace in Postville, Iowa, arresting nearly 400 immigrants for identity theft and document fraud.

Born on this day in history:           

1820 – Florence Nightingale, Italian-English nurse (d. 1910)

1850 – Henry Cabot Lodge, American politician (d. 1924)

1907 – Katharine Hepburn, American actress and singer (d. 2003)

1918 – Julius Rosenberg, American spy (d. 1953)

1928 – Henry Cosby, American songwriter and producer (d. 2002)

1929 – Sam Nujoma, Namibian politician, 1st President of Namibia

1937 – George Carlin, American comedian, actor, and author (d. 2008)

1940 – Jazz singer Al Jarreau was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

1940 – Born on this day, Norman Whitfield, American songwriter and producer, best known for his work with Berry Gordy’s Motown. Collaborated with Barrett Strong on such hits as, ‘I Heard It through the Grapevine’, ‘Ain’t Too Proud to Beg’, ‘(I Know) I’m Losing You’, ‘Cloud Nine’, ‘War’, ‘Papa Was a Rolling Stone’ and ‘Car Wash’. (d. 2008)

1945: Born on this day, Jayotis Washington, singer, The Persuasions, a- cappella group, worked with Joni Mitchell, Stevie Wonder, Don McLean.

1959 – Ving Rhames, American actor

1969 – Kim Fields, American actress, singer, and director

1998 – Tornado Alicia Black, American tennis player

On this day in history, we lost:

1925 – Amy Lowell, American poet (b. 1874)

1951 – Death of former congressman Oscar DePriest (80), Chicago.

2001 – Perry Como, American singer and actor (b. 1912)

Written by Marc Steiner

Marc Steiner

The Marc Steiner Show airs Monday thru Friday from 10AM to Noon on WEAA 88.9 FM. The show covers the topics that matter, engaging real voices, from Charm City to Cairo and beyond. Call us at 410.319.8888 or email us to participate live in the show, or share your comments on our site! Aren’t in Baltimore but want to listen? Stream the show live.


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