The Marc Steiner Show

Racism

Letter from Baltimore: The City That Bleeds: Freddie Gray and the Makings of an American Uprising

Letter from BaltimoreJune 24, 2016 – Segment 3

We talk with Baltimore native Lawrence Jackson, who is a contributor to Harper’s Magazine. In the July issue, Jackson’s “Letter from Baltimore: The City That Bleeds: Freddie Gray and the Makings of an American Uprising” weaves the story of his family’s migration to Baltimore with its brutal implementation of the broken-windows policing theory on its streets and in its schools. “Who doesn’t know,” Jackson asks, “that as American cities became blacker in the Fifties and Sixties, police departments felt fewer qualms about ‘cleaning them up’ with deadly force?”


Exploring The Legal & Social Consequences Of Officer Goodson Not Guilty Verdict In Death Of Freddie Gray

Officer Goodson trialJune 24, 2016 – Segment 2

We host a Legal Roundtable on today’s not guilty verdict for Officer Caesar Goodson in the death of Freddie Gray. With: Steven Levin, Partner at Levin & Curlett LLC and former federal prosecutor; and Doug Colbert, Professor of Law at the University of Maryland Carey School of Law.
Then, we continue our discussion on the Officer Goodson verdict, with a community roundtable of panelists, including: Dominque Stevenson, Program Director for the American Friends Service Committee and co-author of Marshall Law: The Life and Times of a Baltimore Black PantherDr. Robert Birt, author of The Liberatory Thought of Martin Luther King Jr.: Critical Essays on the Philosopher King, and Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Bowie State University; and Doug Colbert, Professor of Law at the University of Maryland Carey School of Law.

Tengella’s Take: A Message To Our Police

Koli TengellaJune 24, 2016 – Segment 1

We begin the show with the newest edition of Tengella’s Take with Koli Tengella. Koli is President of Tengella Edutainment, an instructor and creator of the Positive Social Change Performing Arts Program at Augusta Fells Savage Institute of Visual Arts High School, and he was a 2010 Open Society Institute Fellow.


Officer Caesar Goodson Found Not Guilty In The Death Of Freddie Gray

Caesar GoodsonJune 23, 2016 – Segment 3

The verdict in the Officer Caesar Goodson trial, in the death of Freddie Gray, is scheduled for this morning. Our panel of guests will discuss and analyze the decision.

With: media consultant and political strategist Catalina ByrdDr. Natasha Pratt-Harris, Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at Morgan State University; Eugene Craig III, grassroots activist and 3rd Vice-Chair of the Maryland Republican State Party; Charles Robinson, Political and Business Correspondent For Maryland Public Television; and Tom Maronick, Baltimore attorney and Host of The Tom Moore Show on AM 680 WCBM; Doug Colbert, professor of law at the University of Maryland Carey School of Law; Ralikh Hayes, coordinator of Bmore Bloc; and Tariq Touré, Baltimore activist, essayist, and poet.

 


Talking About Race: Confronting The New Islamophobia

Against the New IslamophobiaJune 21, 2016 – Segment 3

Our guest host is Dr. Lester Spence, Center for Emerging Media Scholar-In-Residence, Associate Professor of Political Science and Africana Studies at Johns Hopkins University and author of Knocking the Hustle: Against the Neoliberal Turn in Black Politics.

We preview an upcoming event hosted by Open Society Institute-Baltimore, “Talking About Race: Confronting the New Islamophobia.” With: Deepa Iyer, senior fellow at the Center for Social Inclusion and author of We Too Sing America: South Asian, Arab, Muslim and Sikh Immigrants Shape Our Multiracial Future; and Amardeep Singh, program officer in Open Society Foundation’s National Security and Human Rights Campaign.

Talking About Race: Confronting the New Islamophobia will take place Thursday, June 23, 7pm, at the Carl J. Murphy Fine Arts Center at Morgan State University.  Click here for more information. 


Tragedy in Orlando: Gun Violence, Masculinity & Safe Spaces

OrlandoJune 20, 2016 – Segment 2

We turn to the tragedy in Orlando, in light of the most recent happenings and information. With: Writer, poet, and activist Tariq Touré; Kalima Young, instructor at Towson University and University of Maryland College Park; Bryanna Jenkins, Executive Director of the Baltimore Trans Alliance; and Jetaime Celestine, radical educator and co-instructor for the Baltimore Free School’s Black Feminism and Intersectionality class.

 


No Boundaries Coalition: Over-Policed, Yet Under-served

westsideJune 15, 2016 – Segment 2

We look at a report released by No Boundaries Coalition, a Central West Baltimore community organization, on alleged police misconduct in West Baltimore. The report is titled “Over-Policed, Yet Under-served,” and details stories of police misconduct witnessed and experienced by West Baltimore residents. Our panel of guests includes: Talear Marrow, part of the No Boundaries Coalition and sister of Jeffrey Marrow who was killed in a police-involved shooting in 2006; Eze Jackson, organizer for the Campaign for Justice Safety and Jobs; and Rebecca Nagle, Director of the No Boundaries Coalition.

Trial of Officer Caesar Goodson: Updates & Commentary

Officer Caesar Goodson (Credit: WSJ)June 10, 2016 – Segment 2

We check in with the trial of Officer Caesar Goodson in the death of Freddie Gray. Goodson was the driver of the van in which Gray allegedly sustained his fatal injuries. With Doug Colbert, Professor of Law at the University of Maryland Carey School of Law.


Race, Class & Gender: Black Lives Matter Activist Jasmine Richards’ Lynching Sentence

Jasmine RichardsJune 8, 2016 – Segment 3

We look at two disturbing legal cases in sharp contrast, both out of California: The sentencing of Black Lives Matter activist Jasmine Richards to 90 days (18 served ) and 3 years probation for “felony lynching,” a technical term in California penal code that means “the taking by means of a riot of another person from the lawful custody of a peace officer;” and the sentencing of a Stanford University male athlete convicted on three felony accounts of raping an unconscious woman on Stanford’s campus – a case that included two eye-witness accounts – who must register as a sex offender but will only serve only six months in prison.

With: Kalima Young, instructor at Towson University and University of Maryland College Park; Dr. Desiree Melton, Associate Professor of Philosophy and Associate Director of the APA Site Visit Program in the School of Arts & Sciences at Notre Dame of Maryland University; and Brittany Oliver, women’s rights activist and co-director of Hollaback! Baltimore.


It Takes a Hood: Discussion With Author Norwood Johnson

It Takes a Hood: Two Young African Americans Take Responsibility for Ending Baltimore Crime (Credit: Amazon)June 3, 2016 – Segment 3

We host an interview with Morgan State University alumnus Norwood Johnson about his book It Takes a Hood: Two Young African Americans Take Responsibility for Ending Baltimore Crime. Johnson is a retired technical writing expert analyst for the federal government.


Roots: The Remake & The Impact Of The Original Series

RootsMay 31, 2016 – Segment 3

Did you watch the premiere of the new Roots series this week? We discuss the remake of the groundbreaking series with: Dr. Lester Spence, Center for Emerging Media Scholar-In-Residence, Associate Professor of Political Science and Africana Studies at Johns Hopkins University, and author of Knocking the Hustle: Against the Neoliberal Turn in Black Politics, and Stare in the Darkness: The Limits of Hip-hop and Black Politics; David Zurawik, Ph.D., Baltimore Sun media critic and Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication & Media Studies at Goucher College; and Carla Wills, Senior News Producer at Democracy Now!

New Lens Presents … Blackonomics: Housing

New Lens May 31, 2016 – Segment 1

We begin the show with a preview of an important event happening this Thursday, hosted by New Lens. Blackonomics: Housing is a video screening, panel discussion and poetry event that examines where we live and how it impacts the Black community.

With: Michael “Mike” Wills, Producer and Organizer with New Lens; Michael Scott, Chief Equity Officer, President and Co-Founder of Equity Matters; and Changa Onyango, member of the intentional community building collective that is forming a micro land trust and Executive Director of Community Meditation.

Blackonomics: Housing will take place Thursday June 2nd from 6:30pm- 9pm at the Downtown Cultural Arts Center, 401 N. Howard St. in Baltimore. New Lens is asking anyone who has a reflection, poem, art piece or song about housing to upload it to their Facebook event page. To RSVP or for more info, contactMichael@newlens.info

Remembering Activist Yuri Kochiyama

Yuri KochiyamaMay 26, 2016 – Segment 1

We begin the show with a remembrance of activist Yuri Kochiyama. Last week would have been her 95th birthday.

We’re joined by Diane Fujino, Associate Professor and Chair of Asian American Studies and an affiliate faculty member of Black Studies at UC Santa Barbara, and author of Heartbeat of Struggle: The Revolutionary Life of Yuri Kochiyama and Samurai Among Panthers: Richard Aoki On Race, Resistance, and a Paradoxical Life.


Reflection & Discussion: Officer Edward Nero Verdict

Officer Edward Nero (Credit: CNN)May 25, 2016 – Segment 3

We continue our reflection and discussion on the Officer Edward Nero “not guilty” verdict in the death of Freddie Gray. With: Dominque Stevenson, Program Director for the American Friends Service Committee and co-author with Eddie Conway of Marshall Law: The Life and Times of a Baltimore Black PantherMichaela Duchess Brown, head of communications for Bmore Bloc; and JC Faulk, organizational development consultant and activist.


The Death of Freddie Gray: Officer Nero Trial Verdict

Officer Nero (Credit: Fox5Sandiesgo)May 24, 2016 – Segment 1

We host a discussion on the verdict of “not guilty on all charges” that was handed down today for Officer Edward Nero in the death of Freddie Gray. With: Doug Colbert, Professor of Law at the University of Maryland Carey School of Law; A. Dwight Pettit, Baltimore defense attorney who has represented clients in police misconduct cases; and Thomas Maronick, Baltimore attorney and Host of The Tom Moore Show on AM 680 WCBM.


The Slave’s Cause: A History Of Abolition

Manisha SinhaMay 20, 2016 – Segment 1

I interview Dr. Manisha SinhaProfessor and Graduate Program Director of Afro-American Studies at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. She is author of the amazing new book The Slave’s Cause: A History of Abolition.


Politics: Bernie Sanders, Race & Black Folks

Bernie SandersMay 18, 2016 – Segment 3

We turn to politics with a discussion on Bernie Sanders, Race and Black Folks. With: Kalima Young, instructor at Towson University and University of Maryland College Park; and Marshall “Eddie” Conway, Producer at the Real News Network‘s Baltimore Bureau, former Black Panther leader and political prisoner, and co-author of Marshall Law: The Life and Times of a Baltimore Black Panther.

Eddie Conway will give us a preview of an event happening this Thursday, May 19, which is Malcolm X’s birthday: A free film screening of the Real Newsdocumentary X: The Final Years. For more information click here.

At the end of the segment, Marc receives a special birthday surprise from good friend and actor Bob Wisdom.


The World That Brought Us Freddie Gray: Episode 1 – The Law

Mural by Nether and Stefan Ways in BaltimoreMay 9, 2016 – Segment 1

We begin the show with Episode 1 of The World That Brought Us Freddie Gray, a 5-part radio documentary produced by students at the University of Maryland Baltimore County in collaboration with the UMBC American Studies Department, Baltimore Traces, and the Center for Emerging Media. During the past semester as part of the UMBC American Studies Class “Radio In American Culture” taught by Steiner Show producer Stefanie Mavronis and myself, students have worked to produce a series highlighting the voices of residents of Baltimore City who have all in one way or another been affected by the death of Freddie Gray and the Uprising that followed.

Episode 1 on The Law features the voices of University of Maryland Carey School of Law professor Doug Colbert; civil rights lawyer A. Dwight Pettit; Tara Huffman of Open Society Insitute-Baltimore; Perry Hopkins of Communities United; Baltimore resident Jessica Wyatt; Out 4 Justice’s Nicole Hanson; No Boundaries Coalition’s Ray Kelly; and Safe Street’s Gregory Mashburn.

Production, research, editing, and voice work for today’s segment on the Law was done by: Darrian Cate, Tyler Walsh, Heather Harvey, and Turrel David with executive production assistance by Marc Steiner, Stefanie Mavronis and Adam Droneburg.


The World That Brought Us Freddie Gray: Episode 2 – Policing & Police-Community Relations

Baltimore PoliceMay 10, 2016 – Segment 1

We begin the show with Episode 2 of The World That Brought Us Freddie Gray, a 5-part radio documentary produced by students at the University of Maryland Baltimore County in collaboration with the UMBC American Studies Department, Baltimore Traces, and the Center for Emerging Media. During the past semester as part of the UMBC American Studies Class “Radio In American Culture” taught by Steiner Show producer Stefanie Mavronis and myself, students have worked to produce a series highlighting the voices of residents of Baltimore City who have all in one way or another been affected by the death of Freddie Gray and the Uprising that followed.

Episode 2 on Policing and Police-Community Relations features the voices of civil rights layer A Dwight Pettit, Law Enforcement Against Prohibition’s Neill Franklin, Communities United’s John Comer, Gilmor Homes resident Tyesha Harrell, McCulloh Homes resident Rochelle Barksdale, former Baltimore police officer Michael A. Wood Jr., and The Real News’ Eddie Conway.

Production, research, editing, and voice work for today’s segment on Policing and Police-Community Relations was done by: Jeremy Mosier, Charlie Klontz, Laura Osborne, and Bryan Hargraves with executive production assistance by Marc Steiner, Stefanie Mavronis and Adam Droneburg.


The World That Brought Us Freddie Gray: Part 4 – Housing

Baltimore Housing (Credit: ujreview.com)May 12, 2016 – Segment 1

We host Part 4 of The World That Brought Us Freddie Gray, a 5-part radio documentary produced by students at the University of Maryland Baltimore County, a collaboration between the students, the UMBC American Studies Department, Baltimore Traces, and the Center for Emerging Media. During the past semester as part of the UMBC American Studies Class “Radio In American Culture” taught by Steiner Show producer Stefanie Mavronis and myself, students have worked to produce a series highlighting the voices of residents of Baltimore City who have all in one way or another been affected by the death of Freddie Gray and the Uprising that followed. Today’s episode focuses on Housing.

Episode 4 on Housing features the voices of Rochelle Barksdale of McCulloh Homes, Tyesha Williams of Gilmor Homes, homeless persons’ and housing advocate Jeff Singer, and Communities United’s John Comer.

Production, research, editing, and voice work for today’s segment on Education was done by: Dalton Maize, Kamilla Keldiyarova, Navaal Mahdi, and James Harris.


Economic Development Alternatives in Baltimore & How We Get There

Baltimore CityMay 10, 2016 – Segment 2

We host another episode of our month-long series Baltimore Uprising: One Year Later. The episode focuses on Economic Development Alternatives in Baltimore & How We Get There. With: Kim Trueheart, longtime citizen activist and former candidate for Baltimore City Council President; Lawrence Grandpre, Assistant Director of Research and Public Policy for Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle; Jeff Singer, community organizer, clinical social worker, public policy advocate, and founder and former Executive Director of Health Care for the Homeless; and Sarah McKinley, Manager of Community Development Programs for The Democracy Collaborative.


Rebroadcast: Voices From the Freddie Gray Protests

Baltimore Uprising (Credit: BaltimoreSun)May 6, 2016 – Segment 3

We continue with Baltimore Uprising, One Year Later, with a rebroadcast of a piece we produced a year ago, Voices from the Freddie Gray Protests, featuring the voices of people at protests during the Uprising. You will hear from: Nyasha Dixon, Ralikh Hayes, Paul Rucker, Willa Bickham, Brendan Walsh, Rev. Dr. Heber Brown III, Molly Amster, Minister Carlos Muhammad, Dayvon Love, Dr. Lawrence Brown, Cordy Shaw, Person Ablach, students from Goucher, Councilpersons Carl Stokes, Nick Mosby, Brandon M. Scott and more.


Jean Albert Renaud on the Lead Up to the 1968 Riots

JARMay 5, 2016 – Segment 2

We continue our feature Baltimore Uprising: One Year Later, as Steiner Show producer Mark Gunnery interviews Jean Albert Renaud in a conversation about the lead up to the 1968 Baltimore riots. Renaud is a former Motown artist, horseman, wild Mustang rancher, and founder of Protect Yourself 1 and Project Arrowhead, two programs for at-risk youth.


Against All Odds: Voices of Popular Struggle In Iraq

Tale Of Two Cities (Credit: Tadween Publishing)April 29, 2016 – Segment 3

We have a conversation with Ali Issa, national field organizer for War Resisters League, about his book “Against All Odds: Voices of Popular Struggle in Iraq.”


A Tale of Two Cities: Examining West Baltimore Then & Now In The Context Of Last April’s Uprising

Tale of Two cities (Credit: Baltimore Magazine)April 29, 2016 – Segment 2

We talk with Ron Cassie, Senior Editor of Baltimore Magazine, about his in-depth and thought-provoking article “A Tale of Two Cities: For half a century, West Baltimore was a vital center of black culture, mixed-income neighborhoods, and groundbreaking civil rights activism. After Freddie Gray, can it be again?”


Baltimore Uprising One Year Later

Baltimore Uprising (Credit: Salon Magazine)April 27, 2016 – Segment 3

We host the most recent episode of Baltimore Uprising, One Year Later. With: Malaika Aminata Clements, Morgan State University Print Journalism graduate and Director of Not About a Riot; Ericka Alston, Director of Business Development for Penn North and Founding Director of Kids Safe Zone; and Dr. Karsonya “Kaye” Whitehead, Assistant Professor of Communication and Affiliate Assistant Professor of African and African American Studies at Loyola University Maryland, and author of Race Brave: New and Selected WorksNotes From a Colored Girl: The Civil War Pocket Diaries of Emile Frances Davis and My Black Sons: Raising Boys in a Post-Racial America.


Baltimore Mayoral Candidates Forum For Ex-Offenders, Part 1

Baltimore Ex-Offenders (Credit: City Paper)April 22, 2016 – Segment 3

We host the first part of a broadcast of the Baltimore Mayoral Forum for Ex-Offenders, which took place Wednesday, April 14, at Douglas Memorial Community Church. Candidates who participated included: Sheila Dixon, Elizabeth Embry, Joshua Harris, DeRay McKesson, State Senator Catherine Pugh, Councilman Carl Stokes, and David Warnock.


Ralikh Hayes Reflects On The Year Since Freddie Gray’s Death & The Uprising

Baltimore Uprising Art (Credit: YesMagazine)April 19, 2016 – Segment 2

Today is the one-year anniversary of the death of Freddie Gray. Producer Stefanie Mavronis brings us a conversation with Ralikh Hayes, organizer with Bmore Bloc, about the anniversary of Gray’s death and of the Baltimore Uprising.


Rebroadcast: Symbols Of The Confederacy

Confederate Statue Vandalism (Credit: CBS News)April 13, 2016 – Segment 2

We host a rebroadcast of “Symbols of the Confederacy,” about Baltimore’s statuary honoring the Confederacy. In January the Baltimore Special Commission that reviewed the city’s Confederate monuments recommended that the Roger Taney Monument on Mount Vernon Place and the Robert E. Lee and “Stonewall” Jackson Monument in the Wyman Park Dell – 2 out of 4 Confederate monuments in Baltimore – be removed.

Our panel of guests includes: Zoë CarpenterThe Nation‘s Assistant Washington Editor, who wrote a blog post “A History of Hate Rock From Johnny Rebel to Dylann Roof;” Yoni Appelbaum, a senior editor at The Atlantic, where he oversees the Politics section and wrote an article titled “Why Is The Flag Still There;” Chris Roberts, advocate and a doctoral student and instructor in the African American Studies Department at Temple University; Dr. Tara Bynum, post-doctoral fellow at Rutgers University; and Evan Serpick, former Editor of the City Paper, who wrote the article “Stop Honoring White Supremacy” and started an online petition to change the name of Robert E. Lee Park.


Understanding Jim Crow: Using Racist Memorabilia to Teach Tolerance and Promote Social Justice.

Understanding Jim Crow (Credit: Amazon)April 13, 2016 – Segment 2

We host a conversation with Dr. David Pilgrim. He is a professor, orator, and human rights activist best known as the founder and curator of the Jim Crow Museum — a ten-thousand-piece collection of racist artifacts located at Ferris State University in Michigan, which uses objects of intolerance to teach about race, race relations, and racism. We talk about his book Understanding Jim Crow: Using Racist Memorabilia to Teach Tolerance and Promote Social Justice.


Debating Bernie Sanders’ Take on Reparations

Bernie Sanders and Ta-Nehisi CoatesApril 12, 2016 – Segment 2

We hear a rebroadcast of a fascinating conversation in which our guests examined Ta-Nehisi Coates’ critiques earlier this year of Bernie Sanders’ stance on reparations. With: A. Adar Ayira, Project Manager of the More in the Middle Campaign for Associated Black Charities and facilitator and analyst at Baltimore Racial Justice Action, a program of Fusion Partnerships; Dr. Lester Spence, Center for Emerging Media Scholar-In-Residence, Associate Professor of Political Science and Africana Studies at Johns Hopkins University, and author ofKnocking the Hustle: Against the Neoliberal Turn in Black Politics; and Bill Fletcher, Jr., Senior Scholar with the Institute for Policy Studies, editorial board member of BlackCommentator.com, and co-author of The Indispensable Ally: Black Workers and the Formation of the Congress of Industrial Organizations, 1934-1941 andSolidarity Divided: The crisis in organized labor and a new path toward social justice.


Fracture: Barack Obama, the Clintons, and the Racial Divide

joy ann reidApril 12, 2016 – Segment 1

It’s WEAA’s Spring Membership Drive. Call 410-319-8888 between 10am and noon with your pledge or go to the WEAA website and designate The Marc Steiner Show when making your pledge. Thanks!! If you pledge $100 you could have Joy-Ann Reid’s book Fracture: Barack Obama, the Clintons and the Racial Divide.

We begin the show with an encore presentation of the conversation I had with Joy-Ann Reid a few weeks ago at the Enoch Pratt Free Library about her book Fracture: Barack Obama, the Clintons, and the Racial Divide. Reid is a national correspondent for MSNBC.


Arts & Culture: The Oscars’ “Whitewash,” Nate Parker’s ‘Birth Of A Nation,’ & More

2016 Oscar NomineesApril 11, 2016 – Segment 2

We look at the controversy over what has been called the “whitewash” of the Oscars.  With: Washington Post Film Critic Ann Hornaday; Dr. Kimberly Moffitt, Associate Professor of American Studies at University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) and co-editor of Blackberries and Redbones: Critical Articulations of Black Hair/Body Politics in Africana Communities; and Kalima Young, Instructor at Towson University and University of Maryland College Park.


RaceBrave: New and Selected Works

racebraveApril 11, 2016 – Segment 1

It’s WEAA’s Spring Membership Drive. Call 410-319-8888 between 10am and noon with your pledge or go to the WEAA website and designate The Marc Steiner Show when making your pledge. Thanks!! If you pledge $100 you could have Dr. Kaye’s new book RaceBrave: New and Selected Works.

Dr. Karsonya “Kaye” Wise Whitehead, Assistant Professor of Communication and Affiliate Assistant Professor of African and African American Studies at Loyola University Maryland, joins us to talk about her new book, RaceBrave: New and Selected Works.

Baltimore Uprising, One Year Later: Paul Rucker on History, Art, and the Uprising

Baltimore Uprising Art (Credit: YesMagazine)April 8th, 2016 – Segment 2

We play a  segment of our project: Baltimore Uprising, One Year Later, we talk with cellist, artist, and Baker Artist Award recipient Paul Rucker about history, art, and the Uprising.


Sound Bites: The Color Of Food | How Race & Agriculture Intersect

The Color of FoodApril 7, 2016 – Segment 3

On Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world, we are joined by Natasha Bowens. Bowens is a beginning farmer and community grower in Western Maryland, who wrote the book The Color of Food: Stories of Race, Resilience and Farming.

Then, we hear from Denzel Mitchell, formerly of Five Seeds Farm and Apiary in Baltimore, as he and Bowens talk about the ways that race intersects with agriculture and our food movement.

This episode is a rebroadcast from August 2015.


Encore Presentation: Four Voices On Reparations

BaltimoreApril 7, 2016 – Segment 2

We rebroadcast a show from earlier this year based on a feature in the Baltimore City Paper: Four Voices on Reparations.

With three of the four featured writers: Tariq Touré, writer, poet, and activist, who wrote the City Paper article, “Bernie Sanders’ approach to reparations should sober Black America;” Dr. Lawrence Brown, public health consultant and Assistant Professor of Public Health in the School of Community Health and Policy at Morgan State University, who wrote the article, “Rationale for the Omnibus American Reparation and Restitution Bill;” and ER Shipp, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and Journalist-in-Residence and Associate Professor of Journalism at Morgan State University, who wrote the article, “Misunderstanding Blackfolks.”


Free Young Blood: Combating the Mass Incarceration of Black Males

free young bloodApril 5, 2016 – Segment 4

We feature a sneak peek at a compelling new documentary that will premiere, panel discussion to follow, Sunday April 17th at 6pm at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum in Baltimore: Free Young Blood. With: Bobby Marvin Holmes, Founder of Son of a Dream, LLC, a youth development consulting and media firm committed to empowering youth and families, author of Casey’s Day with Daddy, and filmmaker who made Free Young Blood with Justin Gladden; Kevin Shird, youth advocate and inspirational speaker and author of the memoir Lessons of Redemption.

 


Police Accountability Legislation in Maryland

annapolisApril 5, 2016 – Segment 2

The Maryland General Assembly is winding down, and we hear an update on the state of legislation on police accountability before the state legislature. With: Dayvon Love, Director of Research and Public Policy for Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle.


Racial Biases of Police & Police/ Community Relationships

13288873315_05960d3e0b_nApril 4, 2016 – Segment 1

Our first group of guests will talk about policing, perceived racial biases of police, and police/community relationships in neighborhoods such as Sandtown-Winchester. With: Tiffany Welch, Director of Health and Food Access for the No Boundaries Coalition; and Ray Kelly, community organizer with the No Boundaries Coalition.

 


Rebroadcast: The Burqa Issue, Examining Complicated Experiences Of Women Who Wear The Burqa

The Burqa Issue (Credit: Of Note Magazine Fall 2015)April 1, 2016 – Segment 3

We play a rebroadcast of a compeling discussion from December 2015 on “The Burqa Issue” of the online magazine OF NOTE, one of the first online magazines focused on global artists using the arts as catalysts for activism and social change. The special issue examined the complicated experiences of women who wear the burqa.

With: Grace Aneiza Ali, Editorial Director and Founder of OF NOTE, faculty member in the Department of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences at The City College of New York (CUNY) and recipient of CUNY’s Outstanding Faculty of the Year Award in 2014; Mariam Magsi, Pakistani-born and Toronto-based photographer who created the cover photo for the Burqa issue of OF NOTEErin Haney, writer and Art Historian who teaches in Maryland and Washington DC, author of the piece on Mariam Magsi for OF NOTE, and co-founder of Resolution, an organization focused on expanding access to photography and archives in Africa; and Mahnaz Rezaie, Digital Curator and filmmaker who was born in western Afghanistan and is now based in DC/Virginia, writer for the Afghan Women Writers Project and mentor for the online Dari workshop for women in Afghanistan who do not speak or write English.


The Social Life of DNA: Race, Reparations, and Reconciliation After the Genome

Dr. Alondra NelsonMarch 31, 2016 – Segment 1

We rebroadcast a fascinating discussion held earlier this year with Dr. Alondra Nelson, Professor of Sociology and Dean of Social Science at Columbia University, where she has served as Director of the Institute for Research on Women, Gender, and Sexuality. Dr. Nelson talks about her book The Social Life of DNA: Race, Reparations, and Reconciliation After the Genome. She also authored Body and Soul: The Black Panther Party and the Fight Against Medical Discrimination.


Cracking the Codes: The System of Racial Inequity

Cracking the Codes (Credit: Dailykos)March 29, 2016 – Segment 3

We host a discussion with filmmaker and racial equity educator Dr. Shakti Butler about her film Cracking the Codes: The System of Racial Inequity.  Butler is President of World Trust, an organization that collaborates with groups and communities, using film and conversation to address subjects such as race and privilege.


What Should US Foreign Policy Be Regarding ISIS

United States Military (Credit: The Odyssey Online)March 29, 2016 – Segment 1

We host a discussion and debate on U.S. foreign policy regarding ISIS. With: James Phillips, Senior Research Fellow for Middle Eastern Affairs at the Douglas and Sarah Allison Center for Foreign and National Security Policy, The Davis Institute for National Security and Foreign Policy at The Heritage Foundation; Peter Certo, editor of Foreign Policy in Focusfor the Institute for Policy Studies; and Malcolm Nance, Executive Director of the Terror Asymmetric Project (TAPSTRI), career counterterrorism intelligence officer, and author of Defeating ISIS: Who they are, how they fight, what they believe.

Also joining the conversation will be Brian Bennet, Staff Writer  for the Los Angeles Times / Tribune Co. Washington Bureau; and Malcolm Nance, Executive Director of the Terror Asymmetric Project (TAPSTRI), career counterterrorism intelligence officer, and author of Defeating ISIS: Who they are, how they fight, what they believe.


The War on Drugs: Conversation & Analysis with Neill Franklin

Neil Franklin (Credit: Baltimore Sun)March 28, 2016 – Segment 2

We check in with the current state of the War on Drugs, with: Neill Franklin, former Baltimore and Maryland State Police officer and Executive Director of LEAP (Law Enforcement Against Prohibition).

Legalize It All: How To Win The War On Drugs

Dan Baum (Credit: Dan Baum website)March 28, 2016 – Segment 1

We host a conversation with with author Dan Baum, about his current front page article in Harper’s magazine, Legalize It All: How to win the war on drugs, which discusses how the Nixon administration’s “War on Drugs” was started to attack Black people and the anti-war left.

Baum has been a staff writer for The New Yorker, as well as a reporter for The Wall Street Journal, The Asian Wall Street Journal, and The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. His books include: Smoke and Mirrors: The War on Drugs and the Politics of Failure and Gun Guys: A Road Trip with author Dan Baum, about his current front page article in Harper’s magazine, Legalize It All: How to win the war on drugs, which discusses how the Nixon administration’s “War on Drugs” was started to attack Black people and the anti-war left. Baum has been a staff writer for The New Yorker, as well as a reporter for The Wall Street JournalThe Asian Wall Street Journal, and The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. His books include: Smoke and Mirrors: The War on Drugs and the Politics of Failure and Gun Guys: A Road Trip.with author Dan Baum, about his current front page article in Harper’s magazine, Legalize It All: How to win the war on drugs, which discusses how the Nixon administration’s “War on Drugs” was started to attack Black people and the anti-war left. Baum has been a staff writer for The New Yorker, as well as a reporter for The Wall Street Journal, The Asian Wall Street Journal, and The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. His books include: Smoke and Mirrors: The War on Drugs and the Politics of Failure and Gun Guys: A Road Trip.


The Concern Over Reparations & Bernie Sanders

Sanders Reparations (Credit: Washington Post)March 25, 2016 – Segment 4

We host a rebroadcast of our show from January when our panel of guests examined Ta-Nehisi Coates’ critique of Bernie Sanders’ statements about reparations.

With: A. Adar Ayira, Project Manager of the More in the Middle Campaign for Associated Black Charities and facilitator and analyst at Baltimore Racial Justice Action, a program of Fusion Partnerships; Dr. Lester Spence, Center for Emerging Media Scholar-In-Residence, Associate Professor of Political Science and Africana Studies at Johns Hopkins University, and author of Knocking the Hustle: Against the Neoliberal Turn in Black Politics; and Bill Fletcher, Jr., Senior Scholar with the Institute for Policy Studies, editorial board member of BlackCommentator.com, and co-author of The Indispensable Ally: Black Workers and the Formation of the Congress of Industrial Organizations, 1934-1941 and Solidarity Divided: The crisis in organized labor and a new path toward social justice.


Abenaki Indian Author Joseph Bruchac: Reflections on Columbus Day

Joseph Bruchac (Credit: poetry.us.com)March 25, 2016 – Segment 3

We host a special archive edition of The Marc Steiner Show from 2009, when Abenaki Indian author and storyteller Joseph Bruchac joined us to reflect on Columbus Day, from his perspective as someone with both Abenaki Indian and European heritage. Abenaki has authored over 70 books, and has worked extensively as a musician and educator.


Tengella’s Take: White Anger Or White Fear

Koli Tengella (Credit: Examiner)March 25, 2016 – Segment 1

We host our our weekly feature Tengella’s Take with Koli Tengella. Koli is President of Tengella Edutainment, an instructor and creator of the Positive Social Change Performing Arts Program at Augusta Fells Savage Institute of Visual Arts High School, and he was a 2010 Open Society Institute Fellow.


Sound Bites: Impact Of Sewage Pollution In Baltimore’s Harbor | Detroit Black Community Food Security Network | Recipe: Palestinian Easter Kaik With Dates

Baltimore Harbor (Photo Credit: Forsaken Fotos via Flickr)March 24, 2016 – Hour 2

For our newest edition of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world.  We begin the hour with an update on the state of sewage pollution in the Baltimore Harbor. Baltimore’s Department of Public Works (DPW) estimated that 12.6 million gallons of wastewater were dumped into the harbor last month following a storm. With: David Flores, Baltimore Harbor Waterkeeper, Blue Water Baltimore.
Then, we talk with Malik Yakini, Executive Director of the Detroit Black Community Food Security Network and founder of D-Town Farm, an urban farm in Detroit. We discuss racism in the food system and the food movement, as well as Yakini’s work for social justice, food equity, and food security for the people of Detroit.
We close out Sound Bites with a special Palestinian Easter Recipe. Laila El-Haddad, co-author of The Gaza Kitchen: A Palestinian Culinary Journey, shares a traditional Palestinian Easter recipe, kaik with dates.

Black Comic Book Mini-Fest, Celebrating Sci-Fi & Black Superheroes

Black Comic Book Mini FestMarch 23, 2016 – Segment 4

We take a look at the Black Comic Book Mini-Fest, happening this Saturday, March 26th from 11a.m. – 5p.m., at Towson University. With: Yumy Odom, Founder and President of East Coast Black Age of Comics Convention, Inc.
The East Coast Black Age of Comics Convention will celebrate literacy and creativity at Towson University with a focus on sci-fi, Black superheroes and super-powered characters. The Black Comic Book Mini-Fest takes place Saturday, March 26, 11am-5pm, at the Towson University Liberal Arts Bldg., 251 University Ave., with a spectacular day of networking, panel discussions, film screenings, a comic book marketplace and youth / adult workshops.

Is The 2016 Election Exposing Two Different Americas?

U.S. presidential hopeful Donald Trump holds up a signed pledge during a press availability at Trump Tower in Manhattan, New YorkMarch 22, 2016 – Segment 2

Our panel of guests joins us for a National Roundtable on the topic of Two Americas.

With: Bill Fletcher Jr., Senior Scholar with the Institute for Policy Studies, editorial board member of BlackCommentator.com, co-author of The Indispensable Ally: Black Workers and the Formation of the Congress of Industrial Organizations, 1934-1941 and Solidarity Divided: The crisis in organized labor and a new path toward social justice; Lenny McAllister, Republican strategist, former congressional candidate, and host of NightTalk: Get To The Point on the Pittsburgh cable news channel and Get Right with Lenny McAllister on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA in Pittsburgh; and John Nichols, national affairs correspondent for The Nation magazine and co-author of People Get Ready: The Fight Against a Jobless Economy and a Citizenless Democracy.


Racism and Violence at Trump Rallies

trumpMarch 14, 2016 – Segment 1

Dr. Karsonya “Kaye” Whitehead joins us as guest host. She is an Assistant Professor of Communication and Affiliate Assistant Professor of African and African American Studies at Loyola University Maryland, and author of Notes From a Colored Girl: The Civil War Pocket Diaries of Emile Frances Davis and My Black Sons: Raising Boys in a Post-Racial America.
We begin the show with a National News Roundtable examining the displays of racism and violence at Trump rallies. With: Dr. Tara Bynum, post-doctoral fellow at Rutgers University; media consultant and political strategist Catalina Byrd; and Lenny McAllister, Republican strategist, former congressional candidate, and host of NightTalk: Get To The Point on the Pittsburgh cable news channel and Get Right with Lenny McAllister on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA in Pittsburgh.

Art-Part’Heid: Racial Disparities in Baltimore Arts Scenes

Art-Part'Heid (Photo by Valeska Populoh)March 11, 2016 – Segment 2

We discuss racial disparities in Baltimore arts scenes with members of Art-Part’Heid, a group formed in 2015. We’re joined by Sheila Gaskins, artist, poet, stand up comic, activist and catalyst for Art-part’heid; Nate VashtiBlue Couser, CEO, founder and creative director at the Artist Exchange and member of Art-Part’Heid; and Olivia Robinson, Baltimore-based artist, faculty member of the Fiber Department at MICA, and member of Luminous Intervention, Art-Part’Heid, and the White Anti-Racism Network, part of Baltimore Racial Justice Action.


Tengella’s Take: White Folk on White Folk Crime!!!

Koli TengellaMarch 11, 2016 – Segment 1

We host our weekly feature Tengella’s Take with Koli Tengella. This week Koli discusses white on white crime. Koli is President of Tengella Edutainment, an instructor and creator of the Positive Social Change Performing Arts Program at Augusta Fells Savage Institute of Visual Arts High School, and he was a 2010 Open Society Institute Fellow.


Over-Policed, Yet Underserved: West Baltimore Residents Share Stories Of Police Misconduct

Over-Policed, Yet UnderservedMarch 10, 2016 – Segment 1

We begin the show with a look at a report released by No Boundaries Coalition, a Central West Baltimore community organization, on alleged police misconduct in West Baltimore. The report is titled “Over-Policed, Yet Underserved,” and details stories of police misconduct witnessed and experienced by West Baltimore residents.

Our panel of guests includes: Talear Marrow, part of the No Boundaries Coalition and sister of Jeffrey Marrow who was killed in a police-involved shooting in 2006; Eze Jackson, Organizer for Campaign for Justice Safety and Jobs; and Rebecca Nagle, Director of the No Boundaries Coalition.


Race and Class Politics in the National Election

Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders will face off on Sunday at the next Democratic debate, moderated by CNN in Flint, Michigan.

March 8, 2016 – Segment 3

Marc discusses race and class politics in the national election. With: Dr. Lester Spence, Center for Emerging Media Scholar-In-Residence, Associate Professor of Political Science and Africana Studies at Johns Hopkins University, and author of Knocking the Hustle: Against the Neoliberal Turn in Black Politics; and Edward Wyckoff Williams, television producer, correspondent and writer living in New York City.

National News Roundup: Election 2016 & Beyond

Senator Bernie Sanders, an independent from Vermont and 2016 Democratic presidential candidate, speaks during a Liberty University Convocation in Lynchburg, Virginia, U.S., on Monday, Sept. 14, 2015. Sanders now leads his Democratic rival former secretary of state Hillary Clinton by double digits in Iowa and New Hampshire, the first two states in where votes will be cast in 2016 to decide the party's presidential nominee. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg *** Local Caption *** Bernie Sanders

February 29, 2016 – Segment 2

Marc hosts a National News Roundup on the 2016 Election and beyond with: Catalina Byrd, media consultant and political strategist; Lenny McAllister, Republican strategist, former congressional candidate, and host of NightTalk: Get To The Point on the Pittsburgh cable news channel and Get Right with Lenny McAllister on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA in Pittsburgh; and Bhaskar Sunkara, Founding Editor of Jacobin and a Senior Editor at In These Times.


Recapping the Oscars & Discussing Race in the Film Industry

3001714270_2e74ccde42_zFebruary 29, 2016 – Segment 1

We host a panel discussion on last night’s Academy Awards. With: Sameer Rao, Culture Reporter for Colorlines; Kalima Young, instructor at Towson University and University of Maryland College Park; Ann Hornaday, Washington Post Film Critic; and filmmaker Chris Eyre, enrolled member of the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes.


From The Archives — Sherman Alexie’s ‘Blasphemy: New and Selected Stories’

sherman alexie blasphemy (Credit: Amazon) February 26, 2016 – Segment 2

We host a special 2012 archive edition of The Marc Steiner Show, as we listen back to my interview with Native American author, poet, and screenwriter Sherman Alexie. Alexie’s compelling book Blasphemy is a collection of new and previously-published short stories.


Sound Bites: Afroculinaria’s Michael Twitty | Building The Black Yield Institute For Black Food Sovereignty

Michael Twitty (Photo Credit: Afroculinaria)February 25, 2016 – Hour 2

On our newest edition of Sound Bites – our series about our food and our world – we begin the hour with my conversation with Michael Twitty, culinary historian of African and African American foodways, blogger at Afroculinaria, and recent TED fellow.
We close the show with Eric Jackson, Servant-Director of the Black Yield Institute, who tells us about Black food sovereignty. Black Yield Institute is an Action Network of Black people and entities that serve to catalyze action in the pursuit of Black food sovereignty in Black and poor Baltimore. The aim of Black Yield Institute is the pursuit of a united Black community in the process of building power through cooperative economics, social and cultural affirmation, political action and collective wellness practices.

Encore Presentation: Joy-Ann Reid On ‘Fracture: Barack Obama, The Clintons, & The Racial Divide’

joy ann reidFebruary 25, 2016 – Hour 1

We begin the show with an encore presentation of the conversation I had with Joy-Ann Reid a few weeks ago at the Enoch Pratt Free Library about her book Fracture: Barack Obama, the Clintons, and the Racial Divide. Reid is a national correspondent for MSNBC.


Police Reform & The War on Drugs: Baltimore’s Shifting Focus

Baltimore Police Scene (Credit: Baltimore Sun) February 23, 2016 – Segment 2

We host a panel which talks about police reform and the war on drugs, with news that the Baltimore Police Department has shifted its focus away from persons committing lesser drug-related crimes and more toward large-scale players in the drug trade. With: Steve Cook, President of the National Association of Assistant United States Attorneys; Capt. Leigh Maddox (Ret.), Special Assistant State’s Attorney who retired as a Captain from the Maryland State Police in 2007 and served as the coordinator for the racial profiling Consent Decree related to the drug interdiction policies of the Maryland State Police; Tessa Hill-Aston, President of the Baltimore branch of the NAACP; and Charles Ellison, political strategist and Host of The Ellison Report on WEAA.


Dr. Lester Spence’s ‘Knocking the Hustle: Against the Neoliberal Turn in Black Politics’

lester_spenceFebruary 18, 2016 – Segment 1

We begin the show with a conversation with Dr. Lester Spence about his new book Knocking the Hustle: Against the Neoliberal Turn in Black Politics. Dr. Spence is Center for Emerging Media Scholar-In-Residence and Associate Professor of Political Science and Africana Studies at Johns Hopkins University.

Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle will host Knocking the Hustle: An evening with Dr. Lester Spence on Friday, February 19, 2016 from 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM at The Real News Network, 231 Holliday Street in Baltimore.


The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution

black panthersFebruary 16, 2016 – Segment 3

We have a preview of the new documentary Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution, which premieres Tuesday, February 16 on PBS. With: Stanley Nelson, award-winning filmmaker, founder of Half Nelson Productions and Director of Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution; and Paul Coates, former Baltimore Black Panther and founder of Black Classic Press.
Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution will be screened tomorrowevening, February 16, at 6:00 pm at the Catonsville Branch of the Baltimore County Public Library. 

Sound Bites: United Nations Comments On Curtis Bay Incinerator | Salisbury Teacher On Protecting Perdue’s Chickens

chickenFebruary 11, 2016 – Segment 3

On our newest edition of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world, we begin the hour with a look at the health implications of the proposed Curtis Bay Incinerator. With: Tim Whitehouse, Executive Director of the Chesapeake Physicians for Social Responsibility, former head of the Law and Policy Program at the Commission for Environmental Cooperation in Montreal, and former senior attorney at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in Washington, D.C.; and Dr. Gwen DuBois, Secretary of the Chesapeake Physicians for Social Responsibility Board of Directors, instructor in Medicine at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and a member of the Public Health Committee of the Maryland State Medical Society.
Last week’s statement issued by United Nations’ Working Group of Experts on People of African Descent stated: “The highest polluting industrial facilities, across a range of sectors from farming, mining to manufacturing, are more likely to be situated in poor and minority neighbourhood, including those of people of African descent. For instance, we are concerned about the possible health risks to people of African descent on account of the incinerator project in Curtis Bay, Baltimore and the lead contaminated water in Flint, Michigan. African American communities are calling for environmental justice as they are concerned that they are disproportionately exposed to environmental hazards impacting their health and standard of living.”
We close the show with a discussion with Jane Langrall Robinson, a middle-school teacher and animal advocate in Salisbury, Maryland, who caught our eye with her op-ed in the Baltimore Sun last month: Protecting Perdue’s chickens.

City Paper Feature: Three Voices on Reparations

slaveshipFebruary 10, 2016 – Segment 2

We showcase a feature from last week’s Baltimore City PaperFour Voices on Reparations. With three of the four featured writers: Tariq Touré, writer, poet, and activist, who wrote the City Paper article, “Bernie Sanders’ approach to reparations should sober Black America;” Dr. Lawrence Brown, public health consultant and Assistant Professor of Public Health in the School of Community Health and Policy at Morgan State University, who wrote the article, “Rationale for the Omnibus American Reparation and Restitution Bill;” and ER Shipp, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and Journalist-in-Residence and Associate Professor of Journalism at Morgan State University, who wrote the article, “Misunderstanding Blackfolks.”


David Pilgrim On Understanding Jim Crow: Using Racist Memorabilia To Teach Tolerance

David Pilgrim (Credit: Salon)February 5, 2016 – Segment 2

We have a conversation with Dr. David Pilgrim. He is a professor, orator, and human rights activist best known as the founder and curator of the Jim Crow Museum — a ten-thousand-piece collection of racist artifacts located at Ferris State University, which uses objects of intolerance to teach about race, race relations, and racism.We speak to him about his book Understanding Jim Crow: Using Racist Memorabilia to Teach Tolerance and Promote Social Justice.


Tengella’s Take: The Super Bowl & Why White People Are Scared Of Cam Newton

Photo Credit: Koli TengellaFebruary 5, 2016 – Segment 1

We host our weekly feature Tengella’s Take with Koli Tengella. Koli is President of Tengella Edutainment, an instructor and creator of the Positive Social Change Performing Arts Program at Augusta Fells Savage Institute of Visual Arts High School, and he was a 2010 Open Society Institute Fellow.


United Nations Urges U.S. Government To Address Legacy Of Slavery With Reparatory Justice

United Nations Working Group of Experts on People of African DescentFebruary 3, 2016 – Segment 2

Last week, after visiting several U.S. cities including Baltimore, the United Nations Working Group of Experts on People of African Descent released a preliminary report in which they urged the U.S. government to address the legacy of slavery, post-Reconstruction “Jim Crow” laws and racial subordination in the United States with reparatory justice.

Our panel of guests addresses this call for reparations: Stephanie Franklin, Founder, President & CEO of the Franklin Law Group, P.C.; Vernellia Randall, Professor Emeritus at University of Dayton; and Michael Scott, Chief Equity Officer/President/Co-Founder of Equity Matters.


From Flint to Baltimore: Clean Water, Environmental Racism & Infrastructure In Our Cities

FLINT, MI - JANUARY 24: Darius Simpson, an Eastern Michigan University student from Akron, Ohio, carries water he brought to donate for Flint residents during a rally on January 24, 2016 at Flint City Hall in Flint, Michigan. The event was organized by Genesee County Volunteer Militia to protest corruption they see in government related to the Flint water crisis that resulted in a federal state of emergency. (Photo by Brett Carlsen/Getty Images)

February 1, 2016 – Segment 2

We discuss our cities from Flint to Baltimore, looking at clean water, environmental racism & infrastructureWith: Dr. Lawrence Brown, public health consultant and Assistant Professor of Public Health in the School of Community Health and Policy at Morgan State University; Mijin Cha, consultant and fellow at Cornell University’s Worker Institute and adjunct professor at Fordham Law School; Henry Louis Taylor, Jr., professor in the Department of Urban and Regional Planning at the University of Buffalo and Director of the University of Buffalo Center for Urban Studies; and Jacqui Patterson, Director of the Environmental and Climate Justice Program at the NAACP.

Baltimore Artists Roundtable: Music, Art, Race and Gender in a Segregated City

CEMJanuary 29, 2016 – Segment 3

Marc Steiner Show producer Mark Gunnery guest hosts a conversation with local musicians, writers and artists about arts and music scenes in Baltimore and creating spaces for Black, people of color, and women performers in a segregated city. With: Abdu Ali, musician and writer; Jenné Afiya, founder of Balti Gurls; Lawrence Burney, writer and editor of True Laurels; and Dylan Ubaldo, founder of the Llamadon Collective.

Sharon Cooper On Her Sister Sandra Bland

sandrabland2January 29, 2016 – Segment 2

We remember Sandra Bland, who died last July in the Waller County, TX, jail, after being arrested on a traffic stop. We talk with her sister Sharon Cooper, as well as: Cannon Lambert, attorney representing Sandra Bland’s family; Tawanda Jones, activist and sister of Tyrone West, who has been organizing WestWednesday protests over the past two years; and Dr. Kimberly Moffitt, Associate Professor of American Studies at University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) and co-editor of Blackberries and Redbones: Critical Articulations of Black Hair/Body Politics in Africana Communities.

Be a voice, not an echo: A talk by Sharon Cooper will take place this Saturday, January 30, at 5pm at Red Emma’s. For more information click here.


Debating Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Bernie Sanders Critique On Reparations

Bernie Sanders and Ta-Nehisi CoatesJanuary 28, 2016 – Hour 1

We begin the show with an examination of Ta-Nehisi Coates’ recent critiques of Bernie Sanders’ stance on reparations.

With: A. Adar Ayira, Project Manager of the More in the Middle Campaign for Associated Black Charities and facilitator and analyst at Baltimore Racial Justice Action, a program of Fusion Partnerships; Dr. Lester Spence, Center for Emerging Media Scholar-In-Residence, Associate Professor of Political Science and Africana Studies at Johns Hopkins University, and author of the forthcoming Knocking the Hustle: Against the Neoliberal Turn in Black Politics; and Bill Fletcher, Senior Scholar with the Institute for Policy Studies, editorial board member of BlackCommentator.com, and co-author of The Indispensable Ally: Black Workers and the Formation of the Congress of Industrial Organizations, 1934-1941 and Solidarity Divided: The crisis in organized labor and a new path toward social justice.


Brown & Healthy: From Motivational Hashtag To Global Wellness Initiative

Brown and HealthyJanuary 27, 2016 – Segment 2

We look at a global initiative that began in 2013 as a motivational hashtag: Brown and Healthy. With Michelle Antoinette Nelson, fitness professional and Founder of Brown and Healthy. Brown and Healthy promotes mental, physical, and spiritual growth and wellness, specifically among people of color.


Arts & Culture: The Oscars’ “Whitewash,” Nate Parker’s ‘Birth Of A Nation,’ & More

2016 Oscar NomineesJanuary 27, 2016 – Segment 1

We begin the show with a look at the controversy over what has been called the “whitewash” of the Oscars.  With: Washington Post Film Critic Ann Hornaday; Dr. Kimberly Moffitt, Associate Professor of American Studies at University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) and co-editor ofBlackberries and Redbones: Critical Articulations of Black Hair/Body Politics in Africana Communities; and Kalima Young, Instructor at Towson University and University of Maryland College Park.

National Roundtable: Democratic Town Hall and Reparations

CNN town hall / Getty ImagesJanuary 26, 2016 – Segment 1

We host a National News Roundtable, where we discuss the Democratic Town Hall and critiques raised by Ta-Nehisi Coates about Bernie Sanders’ refusal to endorse reparations. With: Charles Ellison, political strategist and Host of The Ellison Report on WEAA; Michael Scott, Chief Equity Officer/President/Co-Founder of Equity Matters; and Dr. Marisela Gomez, physician, community activist and author of Race, Class, Power, and Organizing in East Baltimore: Rebuilding Abandoned Communities in America.


Tavis Smiley: The Covenant with Black America 10 Years Later

tavisJanuary 20, 2016 – Segment 2

Marc sits down with talk show host and political commentator Tavis Smiley to discuss his book The Covenant with Black America 10 Years Later. Smiley is Host of The Tavis Smiley Show on PBS.


Police Accountability and Criminal Justice Issues in the Maryland General Assembly

dayvonJanuary 20, 2016 – Segment 1

We take a look at issues of police accountability and criminal justice facing the 2016 Maryland General Assembly, with Dayvon Love, Director of Research and Public Policy for Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle and co-author of The Black Book: Reflections from the Baltimore Grassroots.

The Social Life of DNA: Race, Reparations, and Reconciliation After the Genome with Dr. Alondra Nelson

The Secret Life of DNA (Credit: Beacon)January 19, 2015 – Segment 2

We host a fascinating discussion with Dr. Alondra Nelson, Professor of Sociology and Dean of Social Science at Columbia University, where she has served as Director of the Institute for Research on Women, Gender, and Sexuality. Dr. Nelson talks about her new book The Social Life of DNA: Race, Reparations, and Reconciliation After the Genome. She also authored Body and Soul: The Black Panther Party and the Fight Against Medical Discrimination.


2-Hour Special: The Relevance of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. In Today’s World

MLK Jr. (Credit: Biography.com)January 18, 2015 – Two Hour Special

In honor of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, we feature a special 2-hour conversation on the Rev. Dr. King’s relevancy to this moment: From the 2016 election to community organizing in Baltimore.
Our first panel of guests includes: Dedrick Muhammad, Director of the Racial Wealth Divide Initiative of CFED; Dorcas Gilmore, attorney and consultant focused on community economic development and race equity issues; and Charly Carter, Director of Maryland Working Families.
On our second panel of guests we feature: Makayla Gilliam-Price, Founder of City Bloc and Assata’s Syllabus; Betty Robinson, former member of SNCC and member of Baltimore Standing Up For Racial Justice; Molly Amster of Jews United for Justice; and John Comer, Lead Organizer for Maryland Communities United.

From The Archives: Symbols of the Confederacy

Confederacy Counter Protest (Credit: City Paper)January 15, 2015 – Segment 3

We rebroadcast this conversation in light of the Baltimore Special Commission that’s been reviewing the city’s Confederate monuments announcing their recommendation yesterday that the Roger Taney Monument on Mount Vernon Place and the Robert E. Lee and “Stonewall” Jackson Monument in the Wyman Park Dell — 2 out of 4 Confederate monuments in Baltimore — be removed. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake will have final say over that recommendation.
We are joined by Zoe Carpenter, The Nation‘s Assistant Washington Editor, who wrote a blog post “A History of Hate Rock From Johnny Rebel to Dylann Roof“; Yoni Appelbaum, a senior editor at The Atlantic, where he oversees the Politics section and wrote article titled “Why Is The Flag Still There“; Chris Roberts, advocate and a doctoral student and instructor in the African American Studies Department at Temple University; Dr. Tara Bynum, post-doctoral fellow at Rutgers University; and Evan Serpick, former Editor of the City Paper, wrote the article “Stop Honoring White Supremacy” and started an online petition to change the name of Robert E. Lee Park.

Tengella’s Take: What’s Up With Oregon?

Koli TengellaJanuary 15, 2015 – Segment 1

We have our regular feature Tengella’s Take with Koli Tengella. Koli is President of Tengella Edutainment, an instructor and creator of the Positive Social Change Performing Arts Program at Augusta Fells Savage Institute of Visual Arts High School, and he was a 2010 Open Society Institute Fellow.


Sound Bites: How We Define Organic Food | When Cultural Food Becomes Trendy

Urban Farm (Credit: Grid Philly)January 14, 2015 – Segment 3

We play the latest episode of our series on our food and our world, Sound Bites. First we look at the definitions of organic food with Steve Savage, blogger and Agricultural Technology consultant; and Jay Martin, farmer at Provident Organic Farm.

We then have an interview with Ruth Tam, Web Producer of The Kojo Nnamdi Show and contributor to She the People, about her article for the Washington Post: “How it feels when white people shame your culture’s food – then make it trendy.”


How Did The Democrats Do At The Iowa Brown And Black Forum?

Iowa Brown and Black CaucusJanuary 12, 2016 – Segment 2

Today our panel of guests reflect on the Iowa Brown and Black Forum, the nation’s oldest minority-focused Presidential forum. All three Democratic Presidential candidates will participate. Our panel of guests includes Charles Ellison, political strategist and Host of The Ellison Report on WEAA; Dani McClain, contributing writer for The Nation and Fellow at the Nation Institute where she focuses on race and reproductive justice; and ER Shipp, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, Journalist-in-Residence and Associate Professor of Journalism at Morgan State University.


Trial of Officer Caesar Goodson Jr.

goodsonJanuary 11, 2016 – Segment 1

We begin the show with a discussion on the upcoming trial of Officer Caesar Goodson Jr. in the death of Freddie Gray. With: A. Dwight Pettit, Baltimore defense attorney who has represented clients in police misconduct cases; and Doug Colbert, Professor of Law at the University of Maryland Carey School of Law.


Exploring Another Year of Living and Breathing While Black in America

Photo by J.M. Giordano / Baltimore City PaperJanuary 7, 2016 – Segment 1

Dr. Kaye joins us as a guest host. She is Assistant Professor of Communication and Affiliate Assistant Professor of African and African American Studies at Loyola University Maryland, and author of Notes From a Colored Girl: The Civil War Pocket Diaries of Emile Frances Davis and My Black Sons: Raising Boys in a Post-Racial America.
Dr. Kaye and her panel will discuss Exploring Another Year of Living and Breathing While Black in America. With: Dr. Bettina Love, Associate Professor at the University of Georgia and 2016 Harvard Fellow; Dr. Katrina McDonald, Associate Professor of Sociology at Johns Hopkins University and Board Member of the Center for Africana Studies; Dr. Treva B. Lindsey, Assistant Professor of Women’s, Gender, & Sexuality Studies at Ohio State University; and Lady Brion, spoken word artist and Baltimore’s Grand Slam Champion, Resident Poet for Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle, and Program Manager for Dewmore Baltimore.

Analyzing The Armed Occupation Of Oregon’s Malheur National Wildlife Refuge

ranching-standoff-protest (1)January 6, 2016 – Segment 1

We begin the show with a look at the armed occupation of Oregon’s Malheur National Wildlife Refuge. Joining us will be  Margaret Corvid, writer and activist based in the United Kingdom, New Statesman blogger and a contributing editor of the new left-wing quarterly Salvage; Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, activist and author whose most recent book is “An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States”; and Edward Wyckoff Williams, television producer, correspondent and writer living in New York City.


Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Between the World and Me

coatesDecember 29, 2015 – Segment 2

We hear a repeat broadcast of Marc’s conversation with Ta-Nehisi Coates about his National Book Award-winning Between the World and Me.


Sherrilyn Ifill on a Federal Complaint Against the Hogan Administration on the Red Line

ifillDecember 23, 2015 – Segment 1

We have an update on a federal complaint filed against the administration of Governor Larry Hogan earlier this week, by a coalition of civil rights groups including the NAACP and the ACLU, claiming that the cancellation of Baltimore’s Red Line light rail project discriminates against African-Americans. With: Sherrilyn Ifill, President and Director-Counsel of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc.


Verdict In The Trial Of Officer Porter: Mistrial

william porterDecember 17, 2015 – Segment 1

Today we begin with a panel discussion on the mistrial declared in the trial of Officer William Porter in the death of Freddie Gray.

Our panel of guests include Dominque Stevenson, Program Director for the American Friends Service Committee and co-author with Eddie Conway of Marshall Law: The Life and Times of a Baltimore Black Panther;  Eddie Conway, producer at Real News NetworkMichaela Duchess Brown, head of communications for Bmore Bloc and Doug Colbert,  Professor at University of Maryland School of Law.


Police Practices in Baltimore and Beyond

Major Neill FranklinDecember 16, 2015 – Segment 1

We take a look at the trial of Officer William Porter and the issue of police practices. We speak with Neill Franklin, former Baltimore and Maryland State Police officer and Executive Director of LEAP (Law Enforcement Against Prohibition).


News Roundup: If You Were On The Jury, Would You Convict Officer William Porter?

bcpnews-after-hearing-contrasting-styles-of-closing-arguments-jury-begins-deliberations-in-porter-trial-20151214December 15, 2015 – Segment 1

Today we discuss closing statements in the trial of William Porter and the death of Freddie Gray and now it’s up to the jury. Our panel will reflect on the trial and its implications. They examine a number of issues, including jury instructions and how difficult it might be for the jury to convict Officer Porter. Joining us is Lisa Gray, Assistant Director of Student Life for Cultural and Spiritual Diversity at University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC); Eugene Craig III, grassroots activist and 3rd Vice-Chair of the Maryland Republican State Party; and Charles Ellison, political strategist and Host of The Ellison Report on WEAA.


OF NOTE: The Burqa Issue, Examining Complicated Experiences Of Women Who Wear The Burqa

The Burqa Issue (Credit: Of Note Magazine Fall 2015)December 14, 2015 – Segment 3

We host a fascinating discussion based on the current issue of OF NOTE, one of the first online magazines focused on global artists using the arts as catalysts for activism and social change. We are discussing “The Burqa Issue,” which examines the complicated experiences of women who wear the burqa.

With: Grace Aneiza Ali, Editorial Director and Founder of OF NOTE, faculty member in the Department of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences at The City College of New York (CUNY) and recipient of CUNY’s Outstanding Faculty of the Year Award in 2014; Mariam Magsi, Pakistani-born andToronto-based photographer who created the cover photo for this issue of OF NOTEErin Haney, writer and Art Historian who teaches in Maryland and Washington DC, author of the piece on Mariam Magsi for OF NOTE, and co-founder of Resolution, an organization focused on expanding access to photography and archives in Africa; and Mahnaz Rezaie, Digital Curator and filmmaker who was born in western Afghanistan and is now based in DC/Virginia, writer for the Afghan Women Writers Project and mentor for the online Dari workshop for women in Afghanistan who do not speak or write English.


The Trial On The Death Of Freddie Gray: Officer William Porter

Freddie Gray Trial (Credit: NY Daily News)December 14, 2015 – Segment 1

We discuss a report on the trial of Officer Porter in the death of Freddie Gray. The Defense rested on Friday, December 11, 2015. With: Jaisal Noor, reporter and producer for The Real News, who has been covering the trial; Charles Robinson, political and business correspondent for Maryland Public Television; and Doug Colbert, professor of law at the University of Maryland Carey School of Law, who has been in the court room each day.


Tengella’s Take: The Muslim Community & Trump

Koli TengellaDecember 11, 2015 – Segment 1

We host our weekly feature Tengella’s Take with Koli Tengella. This week’s episode addresses Donald Trump’s comments about Muslims. Tengella is President of Tengella Edutainment, an instructor and creator of the Positive Social Change Performing Arts Program at Augusta Fells Savage Institute of Visual Arts High School, and he was a 2010 Open Society Institute Fellow.


Baltimore Traces: Communities In Transition – Part 3: Changes

Bromo Tower (Credit: baltimore.com)December 9, 2015 – Segment 1

We host the third segment of a series of productions by students in the American Studies Program at University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC), called Baltimore Traces: Communities in Transition.


Social, Racial, Historical and Economic Context of Freddie Gray’s Life and Death

6269710104_5fb0a512fa_bDecember 8, 2015 – Segment 2

Today we examine the conditions of our society that placed Freddie Gray in his social and economic position when he died in police custody last April. Joining us will be Jacqueline Robarge, Founder and Director of Power Inside, a project of Fusion Partnerships; the Rev. Dr. Heber Brown, Pastor of Pleasant Hope Baptist Church and Executive Director of Orita’s Cross Freedom School; and Dr. Lester Spence, Center for Emerging Media Scholar-In-Residence, Associate Professor of Political Science and Africana Studies at Johns Hopkins University, and author of the forthcoming book, Knocking the Hustle: Against the Neoliberal Turn in Black Politics.


From The Archives: The Rebellious Life Of Mrs. Rosa Parks

The Rebellious Life of Mrs Rosa Parks. (Credit: PBS)December 4, 2015 – Segment 6

We host a special archive edition of The Marc Steiner Show. December 1st marked the 60th anniversary of the beginning of the Montgomery Bus Boycott, so to commemorate that date we talk with Dr. Jeanne Theoharis about her book The Rebellious Life of Mrs Rosa Parks.


Towson University Interim President Timothy Chandler On #OccupyTowson & More

Occupy Towson (Credit: Baltimore Sun)December 4, 2015 – Segment 5

I talk with Dr. Timothy Chandler, Interim President of Towson University, about the #OccupyTowson action and his commitment and plans for addressing racism on campus. Prior to coming to Towson, Dr. Chandler was a faculty member at Kent State University for 22 years, serving as Senior Associate Provost and Dean of the College of the Arts.


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