The Marc Steiner Show

Racism

Sound Bites: United Nations Comments On Curtis Bay Incinerator | Salisbury Teacher On Protecting Perdue’s Chickens

chickenFebruary 11, 2016 – Segment 3

On our newest edition of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world, we begin the hour with a look at the health implications of the proposed Curtis Bay Incinerator. With: Tim Whitehouse, Executive Director of the Chesapeake Physicians for Social Responsibility, former head of the Law and Policy Program at the Commission for Environmental Cooperation in Montreal, and former senior attorney at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in Washington, D.C.; and Dr. Gwen DuBois, Secretary of the Chesapeake Physicians for Social Responsibility Board of Directors, instructor in Medicine at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and a member of the Public Health Committee of the Maryland State Medical Society.
Last week’s statement issued by United Nations’ Working Group of Experts on People of African Descent stated: “The highest polluting industrial facilities, across a range of sectors from farming, mining to manufacturing, are more likely to be situated in poor and minority neighbourhood, including those of people of African descent. For instance, we are concerned about the possible health risks to people of African descent on account of the incinerator project in Curtis Bay, Baltimore and the lead contaminated water in Flint, Michigan. African American communities are calling for environmental justice as they are concerned that they are disproportionately exposed to environmental hazards impacting their health and standard of living.”
We close the show with a discussion with Jane Langrall Robinson, a middle-school teacher and animal advocate in Salisbury, Maryland, who caught our eye with her op-ed in the Baltimore Sun last month: Protecting Perdue’s chickens.

City Paper Feature: Three Voices on Reparations

slaveshipFebruary 10, 2016 – Segment 2

We showcase a feature from last week’s Baltimore City PaperFour Voices on Reparations. With three of the four featured writers: Tariq Touré, writer, poet, and activist, who wrote the City Paper article, “Bernie Sanders’ approach to reparations should sober Black America;” Dr. Lawrence Brown, public health consultant and Assistant Professor of Public Health in the School of Community Health and Policy at Morgan State University, who wrote the article, “Rationale for the Omnibus American Reparation and Restitution Bill;” and ER Shipp, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and Journalist-in-Residence and Associate Professor of Journalism at Morgan State University, who wrote the article, “Misunderstanding Blackfolks.”


David Pilgrim On Understanding Jim Crow: Using Racist Memorabilia To Teach Tolerance

David Pilgrim (Credit: Salon)February 5, 2016 – Segment 2

We have a conversation with Dr. David Pilgrim. He is a professor, orator, and human rights activist best known as the founder and curator of the Jim Crow Museum — a ten-thousand-piece collection of racist artifacts located at Ferris State University, which uses objects of intolerance to teach about race, race relations, and racism.We speak to him about his book Understanding Jim Crow: Using Racist Memorabilia to Teach Tolerance and Promote Social Justice.


Tengella’s Take: The Super Bowl & Why White People Are Scared Of Cam Newton

Photo Credit: Koli TengellaFebruary 5, 2016 – Segment 1

We host our weekly feature Tengella’s Take with Koli Tengella. Koli is President of Tengella Edutainment, an instructor and creator of the Positive Social Change Performing Arts Program at Augusta Fells Savage Institute of Visual Arts High School, and he was a 2010 Open Society Institute Fellow.


United Nations Urges U.S. Government To Address Legacy Of Slavery With Reparatory Justice

United Nations Working Group of Experts on People of African DescentFebruary 3, 2016 – Segment 2

Last week, after visiting several U.S. cities including Baltimore, the United Nations Working Group of Experts on People of African Descent released a preliminary report in which they urged the U.S. government to address the legacy of slavery, post-Reconstruction “Jim Crow” laws and racial subordination in the United States with reparatory justice.

Our panel of guests addresses this call for reparations: Stephanie Franklin, Founder, President & CEO of the Franklin Law Group, P.C.; Vernellia Randall, Professor Emeritus at University of Dayton; and Michael Scott, Chief Equity Officer/President/Co-Founder of Equity Matters.


From Flint to Baltimore: Clean Water, Environmental Racism & Infrastructure In Our Cities

FLINT, MI - JANUARY 24: Darius Simpson, an Eastern Michigan University student from Akron, Ohio, carries water he brought to donate for Flint residents during a rally on January 24, 2016 at Flint City Hall in Flint, Michigan. The event was organized by Genesee County Volunteer Militia to protest corruption they see in government related to the Flint water crisis that resulted in a federal state of emergency. (Photo by Brett Carlsen/Getty Images)

February 1, 2016 – Segment 2

We discuss our cities from Flint to Baltimore, looking at clean water, environmental racism & infrastructureWith: Dr. Lawrence Brown, public health consultant and Assistant Professor of Public Health in the School of Community Health and Policy at Morgan State University; Mijin Cha, consultant and fellow at Cornell University’s Worker Institute and adjunct professor at Fordham Law School; Henry Louis Taylor, Jr., professor in the Department of Urban and Regional Planning at the University of Buffalo and Director of the University of Buffalo Center for Urban Studies; and Jacqui Patterson, Director of the Environmental and Climate Justice Program at the NAACP.

Baltimore Artists Roundtable: Music, Art, Race and Gender in a Segregated City

CEMJanuary 29, 2016 – Segment 3

Marc Steiner Show producer Mark Gunnery guest hosts a conversation with local musicians, writers and artists about arts and music scenes in Baltimore and creating spaces for Black, people of color, and women performers in a segregated city. With: Abdu Ali, musician and writer; Jenné Afiya, founder of Balti Gurls; Lawrence Burney, writer and editor of True Laurels; and Dylan Ubaldo, founder of the Llamadon Collective.

Sharon Cooper On Her Sister Sandra Bland

sandrabland2January 29, 2016 – Segment 2

We remember Sandra Bland, who died last July in the Waller County, TX, jail, after being arrested on a traffic stop. We talk with her sister Sharon Cooper, as well as: Cannon Lambert, attorney representing Sandra Bland’s family; Tawanda Jones, activist and sister of Tyrone West, who has been organizing WestWednesday protests over the past two years; and Dr. Kimberly Moffitt, Associate Professor of American Studies at University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) and co-editor of Blackberries and Redbones: Critical Articulations of Black Hair/Body Politics in Africana Communities.

Be a voice, not an echo: A talk by Sharon Cooper will take place this Saturday, January 30, at 5pm at Red Emma’s. For more information click here.


Debating Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Bernie Sanders Critique On Reparations

Bernie Sanders and Ta-Nehisi CoatesJanuary 28, 2016 – Hour 1

We begin the show with an examination of Ta-Nehisi Coates’ recent critiques of Bernie Sanders’ stance on reparations.

With: A. Adar Ayira, Project Manager of the More in the Middle Campaign for Associated Black Charities and facilitator and analyst at Baltimore Racial Justice Action, a program of Fusion Partnerships; Dr. Lester Spence, Center for Emerging Media Scholar-In-Residence, Associate Professor of Political Science and Africana Studies at Johns Hopkins University, and author of the forthcoming Knocking the Hustle: Against the Neoliberal Turn in Black Politics; and Bill Fletcher, Senior Scholar with the Institute for Policy Studies, editorial board member of BlackCommentator.com, and co-author of The Indispensable Ally: Black Workers and the Formation of the Congress of Industrial Organizations, 1934-1941 and Solidarity Divided: The crisis in organized labor and a new path toward social justice.


Brown & Healthy: From Motivational Hashtag To Global Wellness Initiative

Brown and HealthyJanuary 27, 2016 – Segment 2

We look at a global initiative that began in 2013 as a motivational hashtag: Brown and Healthy. With Michelle Antoinette Nelson, fitness professional and Founder of Brown and Healthy. Brown and Healthy promotes mental, physical, and spiritual growth and wellness, specifically among people of color.


Arts & Culture: The Oscars’ “Whitewash,” Nate Parker’s ‘Birth Of A Nation,’ & More

2016 Oscar NomineesJanuary 27, 2016 – Segment 1

We begin the show with a look at the controversy over what has been called the “whitewash” of the Oscars.  With: Washington Post Film Critic Ann Hornaday; Dr. Kimberly Moffitt, Associate Professor of American Studies at University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) and co-editor ofBlackberries and Redbones: Critical Articulations of Black Hair/Body Politics in Africana Communities; and Kalima Young, Instructor at Towson University and University of Maryland College Park.

National Roundtable: Democratic Town Hall and Reparations

CNN town hall / Getty ImagesJanuary 26, 2016 – Segment 1

We host a National News Roundtable, where we discuss the Democratic Town Hall and critiques raised by Ta-Nehisi Coates about Bernie Sanders’ refusal to endorse reparations. With: Charles Ellison, political strategist and Host of The Ellison Report on WEAA; Michael Scott, Chief Equity Officer/President/Co-Founder of Equity Matters; and Dr. Marisela Gomez, physician, community activist and author of Race, Class, Power, and Organizing in East Baltimore: Rebuilding Abandoned Communities in America.


Tavis Smiley: The Covenant with Black America 10 Years Later

tavisJanuary 20, 2016 – Segment 2

Marc sits down with talk show host and political commentator Tavis Smiley to discuss his book The Covenant with Black America 10 Years Later. Smiley is Host of The Tavis Smiley Show on PBS.


Police Accountability and Criminal Justice Issues in the Maryland General Assembly

dayvonJanuary 20, 2016 – Segment 1

We take a look at issues of police accountability and criminal justice facing the 2016 Maryland General Assembly, with Dayvon Love, Director of Research and Public Policy for Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle and co-author of The Black Book: Reflections from the Baltimore Grassroots.

The Social Life of DNA: Race, Reparations, and Reconciliation After the Genome with Dr. Alondra Nelson

The Secret Life of DNA (Credit: Beacon)January 19, 2015 – Segment 2

We host a fascinating discussion with Dr. Alondra Nelson, Professor of Sociology and Dean of Social Science at Columbia University, where she has served as Director of the Institute for Research on Women, Gender, and Sexuality. Dr. Nelson talks about her new book The Social Life of DNA: Race, Reparations, and Reconciliation After the Genome. She also authored Body and Soul: The Black Panther Party and the Fight Against Medical Discrimination.


2-Hour Special: The Relevance of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. In Today’s World

MLK Jr. (Credit: Biography.com)January 18, 2015 – Two Hour Special

In honor of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, we feature a special 2-hour conversation on the Rev. Dr. King’s relevancy to this moment: From the 2016 election to community organizing in Baltimore.
Our first panel of guests includes: Dedrick Muhammad, Director of the Racial Wealth Divide Initiative of CFED; Dorcas Gilmore, attorney and consultant focused on community economic development and race equity issues; and Charly Carter, Director of Maryland Working Families.
On our second panel of guests we feature: Makayla Gilliam-Price, Founder of City Bloc and Assata’s Syllabus; Betty Robinson, former member of SNCC and member of Baltimore Standing Up For Racial Justice; Molly Amster of Jews United for Justice; and John Comer, Lead Organizer for Maryland Communities United.

From The Archives: Symbols of the Confederacy

Confederacy Counter Protest (Credit: City Paper)January 15, 2015 – Segment 3

We rebroadcast this conversation in light of the Baltimore Special Commission that’s been reviewing the city’s Confederate monuments announcing their recommendation yesterday that the Roger Taney Monument on Mount Vernon Place and the Robert E. Lee and “Stonewall” Jackson Monument in the Wyman Park Dell — 2 out of 4 Confederate monuments in Baltimore — be removed. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake will have final say over that recommendation.
We are joined by Zoe Carpenter, The Nation‘s Assistant Washington Editor, who wrote a blog post “A History of Hate Rock From Johnny Rebel to Dylann Roof“; Yoni Appelbaum, a senior editor at The Atlantic, where he oversees the Politics section and wrote article titled “Why Is The Flag Still There“; Chris Roberts, advocate and a doctoral student and instructor in the African American Studies Department at Temple University; Dr. Tara Bynum, post-doctoral fellow at Rutgers University; and Evan Serpick, former Editor of the City Paper, wrote the article “Stop Honoring White Supremacy” and started an online petition to change the name of Robert E. Lee Park.

Tengella’s Take: What’s Up With Oregon?

Koli TengellaJanuary 15, 2015 – Segment 1

We have our regular feature Tengella’s Take with Koli Tengella. Koli is President of Tengella Edutainment, an instructor and creator of the Positive Social Change Performing Arts Program at Augusta Fells Savage Institute of Visual Arts High School, and he was a 2010 Open Society Institute Fellow.


Sound Bites: How We Define Organic Food | When Cultural Food Becomes Trendy

Urban Farm (Credit: Grid Philly)January 14, 2015 – Segment 3

We play the latest episode of our series on our food and our world, Sound Bites. First we look at the definitions of organic food with Steve Savage, blogger and Agricultural Technology consultant; and Jay Martin, farmer at Provident Organic Farm.

We then have an interview with Ruth Tam, Web Producer of The Kojo Nnamdi Show and contributor to She the People, about her article for the Washington Post: “How it feels when white people shame your culture’s food – then make it trendy.”


How Did The Democrats Do At The Iowa Brown And Black Forum?

Iowa Brown and Black CaucusJanuary 12, 2016 – Segment 2

Today our panel of guests reflect on the Iowa Brown and Black Forum, the nation’s oldest minority-focused Presidential forum. All three Democratic Presidential candidates will participate. Our panel of guests includes Charles Ellison, political strategist and Host of The Ellison Report on WEAA; Dani McClain, contributing writer for The Nation and Fellow at the Nation Institute where she focuses on race and reproductive justice; and ER Shipp, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, Journalist-in-Residence and Associate Professor of Journalism at Morgan State University.


Trial of Officer Caesar Goodson Jr.

goodsonJanuary 11, 2016 – Segment 1

We begin the show with a discussion on the upcoming trial of Officer Caesar Goodson Jr. in the death of Freddie Gray. With: A. Dwight Pettit, Baltimore defense attorney who has represented clients in police misconduct cases; and Doug Colbert, Professor of Law at the University of Maryland Carey School of Law.


Exploring Another Year of Living and Breathing While Black in America

Photo by J.M. Giordano / Baltimore City PaperJanuary 7, 2016 – Segment 1

Dr. Kaye joins us as a guest host. She is Assistant Professor of Communication and Affiliate Assistant Professor of African and African American Studies at Loyola University Maryland, and author of Notes From a Colored Girl: The Civil War Pocket Diaries of Emile Frances Davis and My Black Sons: Raising Boys in a Post-Racial America.
Dr. Kaye and her panel will discuss Exploring Another Year of Living and Breathing While Black in America. With: Dr. Bettina Love, Associate Professor at the University of Georgia and 2016 Harvard Fellow; Dr. Katrina McDonald, Associate Professor of Sociology at Johns Hopkins University and Board Member of the Center for Africana Studies; Dr. Treva B. Lindsey, Assistant Professor of Women’s, Gender, & Sexuality Studies at Ohio State University; and Lady Brion, spoken word artist and Baltimore’s Grand Slam Champion, Resident Poet for Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle, and Program Manager for Dewmore Baltimore.

Analyzing The Armed Occupation Of Oregon’s Malheur National Wildlife Refuge

ranching-standoff-protest (1)January 6, 2016 – Segment 1

We begin the show with a look at the armed occupation of Oregon’s Malheur National Wildlife Refuge. Joining us will be  Margaret Corvid, writer and activist based in the United Kingdom, New Statesman blogger and a contributing editor of the new left-wing quarterly Salvage; Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, activist and author whose most recent book is “An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States”; and Edward Wyckoff Williams, television producer, correspondent and writer living in New York City.


Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Between the World and Me

coatesDecember 29, 2015 – Segment 2

We hear a repeat broadcast of Marc’s conversation with Ta-Nehisi Coates about his National Book Award-winning Between the World and Me.


Sherrilyn Ifill on a Federal Complaint Against the Hogan Administration on the Red Line

ifillDecember 23, 2015 – Segment 1

We have an update on a federal complaint filed against the administration of Governor Larry Hogan earlier this week, by a coalition of civil rights groups including the NAACP and the ACLU, claiming that the cancellation of Baltimore’s Red Line light rail project discriminates against African-Americans. With: Sherrilyn Ifill, President and Director-Counsel of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc.


Verdict In The Trial Of Officer Porter: Mistrial

william porterDecember 17, 2015 – Segment 1

Today we begin with a panel discussion on the mistrial declared in the trial of Officer William Porter in the death of Freddie Gray.

Our panel of guests include Dominque Stevenson, Program Director for the American Friends Service Committee and co-author with Eddie Conway of Marshall Law: The Life and Times of a Baltimore Black Panther;  Eddie Conway, producer at Real News NetworkMichaela Duchess Brown, head of communications for Bmore Bloc and Doug Colbert,  Professor at University of Maryland School of Law.


Police Practices in Baltimore and Beyond

Major Neill FranklinDecember 16, 2015 – Segment 1

We take a look at the trial of Officer William Porter and the issue of police practices. We speak with Neill Franklin, former Baltimore and Maryland State Police officer and Executive Director of LEAP (Law Enforcement Against Prohibition).


News Roundup: If You Were On The Jury, Would You Convict Officer William Porter?

bcpnews-after-hearing-contrasting-styles-of-closing-arguments-jury-begins-deliberations-in-porter-trial-20151214December 15, 2015 – Segment 1

Today we discuss closing statements in the trial of William Porter and the death of Freddie Gray and now it’s up to the jury. Our panel will reflect on the trial and its implications. They examine a number of issues, including jury instructions and how difficult it might be for the jury to convict Officer Porter. Joining us is Lisa Gray, Assistant Director of Student Life for Cultural and Spiritual Diversity at University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC); Eugene Craig III, grassroots activist and 3rd Vice-Chair of the Maryland Republican State Party; and Charles Ellison, political strategist and Host of The Ellison Report on WEAA.


OF NOTE: The Burqa Issue, Examining Complicated Experiences Of Women Who Wear The Burqa

The Burqa Issue (Credit: Of Note Magazine Fall 2015)December 14, 2015 – Segment 3

We host a fascinating discussion based on the current issue of OF NOTE, one of the first online magazines focused on global artists using the arts as catalysts for activism and social change. We are discussing “The Burqa Issue,” which examines the complicated experiences of women who wear the burqa.

With: Grace Aneiza Ali, Editorial Director and Founder of OF NOTE, faculty member in the Department of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences at The City College of New York (CUNY) and recipient of CUNY’s Outstanding Faculty of the Year Award in 2014; Mariam Magsi, Pakistani-born andToronto-based photographer who created the cover photo for this issue of OF NOTEErin Haney, writer and Art Historian who teaches in Maryland and Washington DC, author of the piece on Mariam Magsi for OF NOTE, and co-founder of Resolution, an organization focused on expanding access to photography and archives in Africa; and Mahnaz Rezaie, Digital Curator and filmmaker who was born in western Afghanistan and is now based in DC/Virginia, writer for the Afghan Women Writers Project and mentor for the online Dari workshop for women in Afghanistan who do not speak or write English.


The Trial On The Death Of Freddie Gray: Officer William Porter

Freddie Gray Trial (Credit: NY Daily News)December 14, 2015 – Segment 1

We discuss a report on the trial of Officer Porter in the death of Freddie Gray. The Defense rested on Friday, December 11, 2015. With: Jaisal Noor, reporter and producer for The Real News, who has been covering the trial; Charles Robinson, political and business correspondent for Maryland Public Television; and Doug Colbert, professor of law at the University of Maryland Carey School of Law, who has been in the court room each day.


Tengella’s Take: The Muslim Community & Trump

Koli TengellaDecember 11, 2015 – Segment 1

We host our weekly feature Tengella’s Take with Koli Tengella. This week’s episode addresses Donald Trump’s comments about Muslims. Tengella is President of Tengella Edutainment, an instructor and creator of the Positive Social Change Performing Arts Program at Augusta Fells Savage Institute of Visual Arts High School, and he was a 2010 Open Society Institute Fellow.


Baltimore Traces: Communities In Transition – Part 3: Changes

Bromo Tower (Credit: baltimore.com)December 9, 2015 – Segment 1

We host the third segment of a series of productions by students in the American Studies Program at University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC), called Baltimore Traces: Communities in Transition.


Social, Racial, Historical and Economic Context of Freddie Gray’s Life and Death

6269710104_5fb0a512fa_bDecember 8, 2015 – Segment 2

Today we examine the conditions of our society that placed Freddie Gray in his social and economic position when he died in police custody last April. Joining us will be Jacqueline Robarge, Founder and Director of Power Inside, a project of Fusion Partnerships; the Rev. Dr. Heber Brown, Pastor of Pleasant Hope Baptist Church and Executive Director of Orita’s Cross Freedom School; and Dr. Lester Spence, Center for Emerging Media Scholar-In-Residence, Associate Professor of Political Science and Africana Studies at Johns Hopkins University, and author of the forthcoming book, Knocking the Hustle: Against the Neoliberal Turn in Black Politics.


From The Archives: The Rebellious Life Of Mrs. Rosa Parks

The Rebellious Life of Mrs Rosa Parks. (Credit: PBS)December 4, 2015 – Segment 6

We host a special archive edition of The Marc Steiner Show. December 1st marked the 60th anniversary of the beginning of the Montgomery Bus Boycott, so to commemorate that date we talk with Dr. Jeanne Theoharis about her book The Rebellious Life of Mrs Rosa Parks.


Towson University Interim President Timothy Chandler On #OccupyTowson & More

Occupy Towson (Credit: Baltimore Sun)December 4, 2015 – Segment 5

I talk with Dr. Timothy Chandler, Interim President of Towson University, about the #OccupyTowson action and his commitment and plans for addressing racism on campus. Prior to coming to Towson, Dr. Chandler was a faculty member at Kent State University for 22 years, serving as Senior Associate Provost and Dean of the College of the Arts.


Tengella’s Take: Hey, I’m America! So, You Say You’re A Terrorist?

koliTangellaDecember 4, 2015 – Segment 1

We host our weekly feature Tengella’s Take with Koli Tengella. Koli’s topic this week is “Hey, I’m America! So you say you’re a terrorist?” Koli is President of Tengella Edutainment, an instructor and creator of the Positive Social Change Performing Arts Program at Augusta Fells Savage Institute of Visual Arts High School, and he was a 2010 Open Society Institute Fellow.


150th Anniversary Of The Ratification Of The 13th Amendment Ending Slavery

13th AmendmentDecember 3, 2015 – Segment 2

On December 6, 1865 the 13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, officially ending the institution of slavery, was ratified. “Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.” With these words, the single greatest change bought about from the Civil War was officially noted in the Constitution. The ratification came eight months after the end of the war, but it represented the culmination of a long struggle against slavery.

Joining guest host Dr. Kaye Whitehead to talk to us about these changes and about how far we need to go are: Dr. Joycelyn Moody, Sue E. Denman Distinguished Chair in American Literature at the University of Texas at San Antonio, where she teaches and researches 19th-century African American literature; and Dr. Treva Lindsey, Assistant Professor in the Department of Women’s Gender and Sexuality Studies at Ohio State University.


Theatre Baltimore: Center Stage Presents ‘Doing Time In Education, The Baltimore Chapter’

Notes from the Field: Doing Time in Education The California Chapter (Credit: Berkley Rep)December 2, 2015 – Segment 3

We host a preview of a special series of events to occur this weekend at Baltimore’s Centre Stage Theatre: Anna Deavere Smith presents Notes from the Field: Doing Time in Education, The Baltimore ChapterThis new production is comprised of material collected through Smith’s interviews with more than 100 individuals in Baltimore who are affected by what has been commonly named the “school-to-prison pipeline.” Smith will present a reading of her work, followed by facilitated small-group discussions of how to be part of the effort to affect change. A Baltimore native known for her television and movie roles in The West Wing, Nurse Jackie, The American President, and Blackish, Smith will join me to talk about her life, Baltimore, and this new production.

Notes from the Field: Doing Time in Education, The Baltimore Chapter will take place at Center Stage Saturday December 5, 2015 and Sunday December 6, 2015.


Media Roundtable: How Traditional Media & Social Media Affect Politics

Courthouse Reporting (Credit: City Paper)December 2, 2015 – Segment 2

We host a media roundtable to examine traditional media and social media and how they affect politics, and reflect upon the ethics of media production. With: Karen Houppert, Editor-in-Chief of Baltimore City Paper; media consultant and political strategist Catalina Byrd; and Charles Robinson, Political and Business Correspondent For Maryland Public Television.


Rise Of Islamophobia & Anti-Arab Racism In America

Mosque Dar Al Taqwa (Credit: Huffington Post) December 1, 2015 – Segment 2

We look at the recent upsurge in Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism. With: Zainab Chaudry, Maryland Outreach Manager, Council on American Islamic Relations; Dr. Adil Shamoo, Associate Fellow for the Institute for Policy Studies, Senior Analyst for Foreign Policy in Focus, and author of Equal Worth: When Humanity Will Have Peace; and Dr. Steven Salaita, Edward Said Chair of American Studies at the American University of Beirut.


Local News Roundtable: Local Elections & The Freddie Gray Case

Freddie Gray Protest (Credit: ABC7 News)November 30, 2015 – Segment 2

We host a Local News Roundtable, where we discuss topics to include the local elections and the Freddie Gray trial. With: A. Rod Womack, author of Redwood and former owner of the Redwood Grill in Baltimore; Dr. Kimberly Moffitt, Associate Professor of American Studies at University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) and co-editor of Blackberries and Redbones: Critical Articulations of Black Hair/Body Politics in Africana Communities; Luke Broadwater, reporter at the Baltimore Sun, where he covers Baltimore’s City Hall and local politics; and Dr. Richard Vatz, Professor of Rhetoric and Communication at Towson University’s Department of Instructional Leadership and Professional Development.


Trial in the Freddie Gray Case: What To Expect

Freddie Gray Protest (Credit: ABC7 News)November 25, 2015 – Segment 3

With the first trial for the officers involved in the death of Freddie Gray beginning next week, Monday November 30th, 2015, we get a preview in this segment of what to expect.

With: A. Dwight Pettit, Baltimore defense attorney who has represented clients in police misconduct cases.


The Rightward Shift In Politics: Trump Rallies & The Shooting Of Jamar Clark

Protester Beaten (Credit: Business Insider) November 25, 2015 – Segment 2

We take a look at the national political climate, with topics to include: protests in Minneapolis following last week’s police shooting of Jamar Clark; the violent turn at a Trump rally when a protester was roughed up by Trump supporters; and a general rightward shift in politics. With: Jamil Smith, Senior Editor for The New Republic whose most recent article is “Donald Trump’s Recipe for More Tamir Rices;” and Zoe Carpenter, Assistant Washington Editor for The Nation.


#OccupyTowson: Black Towson University Students Issue Demands To Administration

#OccupyTowson November 23, 2015 – Segment 3

We look at the recent upsurge in student activism on campus, part of the #Occupy movement, in particular #OccupyTowson. Last Wednesday a group of Black Towson University students brought a list of demands to Towson’s interim President Timothy Chandler and talked with him until after midnight, when he pledged to address their concerns.

With: Korey Johnson, member of the first debate team of Black women to win a national championship (2014), youth advocate for Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle, and one of the organizers of the Towson occupation; and Dayvon Love, Towson University alumnus and Director of Research and Public Policy for Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle.


Pray For Paris: The Confusing Politics of Native People Mourning Tragedies

Pray For Paris: The Confusing Politics of Native People Mourning Tragedies Read more at http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2015/11/17/pray-paris-confusing-politics-native-people-mourning-tragedies-162455November 23, 2015 – Segment 2

We’re joined by Native American writer, father, attorney, and artist Gyasi Ross, to talk about his recent article, “Pray For Paris: The Confusing Politics of Native People Mourning Tragedies.” Ross is a member of the Blackfeet Tribe, and author of How To Say I Love You In Indian.


Maryland & The Syrian Refugee Crisis

Syrian internally displaced people walk in the Atme camp, along the Turkish border in the northwestern Syrian province of Idlib, on March 19, 2013. The conflict in Syria between rebel forces and pro-government troops has killed at least 70,000 people, and forced more than one million Syrians to seek refuge abroad. AFP PHOTO/BULENT KILIC        (Photo credit should read BULENT KILIC/AFP/Getty Images)November 23, 2015 – Segment 1

We take a look at the Syrian refugee crisis and Maryland’s role in taking in refugees. With: Sirine Shebaya, staff attorney with the ACLU of Maryland who focuses on immigrant’s rights advocacy; Zainab Chaudry, Maryland Outreach Manager for the Council on American Islamic Relations; and James Paul, author of Syria Unmasked and former Executive Director of Global Policy Forum, a think tank that monitors the UN.

Not About A Riot: Stories of Hope, Resilience, and Community

Not About a Riot (Credit: EMP Collective)November 18, 2015 – Segment 3

We take a look at an exciting new film premiering this Sunday, November 22, at 7:00pm at the EMP CollectiveNot About a Riot tells the stories of the Baltimore Uprising that media didn’t cover – stories of hope, resilience, and community.

With: Malaika Aminata Clements, Morgan State University Print Journalism graduate and Director of Not About a Riot; and Nia Hampton, writer and filmmaker.


Overview of the Uprising Report and Homicides in Baltimore

Photo by J.M. Giordano/City PaperNovember 17, 2015 – Segment 1

A report issued today by the Police Executive Research Forum, “Lessons Learned from the 2015 Civil Unrest in Baltimore,” indicates that the Baltimore Police Department was ill-prepared to handle the uprising following the death of 25-year-old Freddie Gray last April. Our panel of guests look at this report as well as the news over the weekend that Baltimore’s homicide rate surpassed the 300 mark. We are joined by Catalina Byrd, media consultant and political strategist; Luke Broadwater, reporter at theBaltimore Sun, where he covers Baltimore’s City Hall and local politics; Michael Eugene Johnson, community leader and Executive Director of the Paul Robeson Institute for Social Change; and Dayvon Love, Director of Research and Public Policy for Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle.


Pervasive Racism On Our Campuses

CopyCat Vandalism (Credit: On Background)November 16, 2015 – Segment 2

We take a look at racism on college campuses and rising student activism in response. Our panel of guests includes: A. Adar Ayira, Project Manager of the More in the Middle Campaign for Associated Black Charities and facilitator and analyst at Baltimore Racial Justice Action, a program of Fusion Partnerships; Eugene Craig III, grassroots activist and 3rd Vice-Chair of the Maryland Republican State Party; Emerson P. Loisel, Assistant Director of the Student Activities Office at Maryland Institute College of Art; and Korey Johnson, member of the first debate team of Black women, in 2014, to win a national championship, and youth advocate for Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle.

Media Coverage & The University of Missouri

The University of Missouri (Credit: The Voice Of America)November 16, 2015 – Segment 1

We take a look at the media coverage around the racist incidents at the University of Missouri. With Terrell Jermaine Starr, freelance reporter who wrote a piece called “There’s a good reason protesters at the University of Missouri didn’t want the media around” for The Washington Post.


Sound Bites: Future of Food in Baltimore, Part 2 | Fast Food Chains Move To Antibiotic-Free Meat

(Photo Credit: Mike Mozart on Flickr) November 12, 2015 – Segment 3

We begin this week’s edition of Sound Bites with the second part of the panel Marc moderated last week on the Future of Food in Baltimore, reflecting upon the significant community work happening in this city to rebuild the region’s food system. The conversation took place at the the Second Annual Town Creek Foundation Stakeholder Meeting. The Town Creek Foundation is one of the funders of The Marc Steiner Show and Sound Bites. The guests were: the Rev. Dr. Heber Brown, Pastor of Pleasant Hope Baptist Church and Executive Director of Orita’s Cross Freedom School; Sache Jones, Food Justice Consultant for the Park Heights Community Health Alliance and Manager of the AFYA Community Teaching Garden in Park Heights; and Kurt Sommer, Director of the Baltimore Integration Partnership for the Association of Baltimore Area Grantmakers.

Our show ends with a conversation on the recent announcements by fast food chains Subway and McDonald’s that they are beginning to fade out the use of meats from animals raised with antibiotics. With: Evi Lowman, Campaign Organizer for Maryland PIRG (Public Interest Research Group); and Mae Wu, attorney for the National Resources Defense Counsel’s health program.


#FeesMustFall: The Struggle for Equality on South Africa’s College Campuses

#feesmustfall Movement in South Africa (Photo by Jesús Hidalgo | The Chronicle)November 12, 2015 – Segment 1

We turn our attention to South Africa and the student demonstrations that have taken place over the past few weeks across that nation as part of the #FeesMustFall movement. You will hear from: Dr. Xolela Mangcu, founding Executive Director of the Steve Biko Foundation and Associate Professor of Sociology at the University Of Cape Town; and Adrian Louw, Program Integrator at Bush Radio in Cape Town South Africa (the oldest community radio station in South Africa) and former Media Liaison for the Republic of South Africa Parliament.

Profiled: Women’s Voices in Racial Profiling and Police Brutality

Kathleen Forster's 'Profiled' (Photo Credit: Kathleen Forster, Indiegogo)November 10, 2015 – Segment 3

We preview the new movie Profiled, which highlights women’s voices and concerns as part of the national dialogue on racial profiling and police brutality, and tells their powerful stories that bear witness to the institutional racism that drives such violence.

We speak with Kathleen Foster, director of Profiled, and producer of  independent documentaries that combine elements of individual stories, current events and history with a focus on grassroots struggles for change.


University of Missouri President Resigns Amid Campus Protests & Football Strike

university of missouriNovember 10, 2015 – Segment 1

We begin the show with a look at the story behind the resignation of University of Missouri’s president amid campus protests over the school’s handling of a number of racist incidents. We are joined by  Dave Zirin, Host of The Edge of Sports Radio, Sports Editor for The Nation, and author of many books including Brazil’s Dance with the Devil: The World Cup and the Fight for Democracy.


The Role of Police Officers In Our Schools

School Police (Credit: MSNBC)November 4, 2015 – Segment 1

We discuss the role of police officers in schools. With: Nikki Glass, Operations Director and Facilitator for Community Conferencing; Monique Dixon, Deputy Director of Policy for the NAACP Legal Defense Fund; Melissa Schober, parent of a second grader in Baltimore, with expertise in public health policy; and Karen Webber, Director of OSI Baltimore’s Education and Youth Development program.


Hartford County, Maryland Cross Burnings

November 3, 2015 – Segment 2Screen Shot 2015-11-04 at 12.37.30 AM

Next we turn our focus to recent reports of cross burnings in Harford County, Maryland. Marc is joined by Gina Pierleoni, concerned resident of Bel Air, Maryland, mixed media artist, and adjunct Painting and Drawing Professor at Harford Community College.


UMBC Critical Social Justice Town Hall: “Baltimore in Action: Always Rising”

UMBC Critical Social JusticeNovember 2, 2015 – 2-Hour Special

Listen to a special two-hour broadcast of “Baltimore in Action: Always Rising,” a keynote panel discussion held on October 20 at University of Maryland-Baltimore County (UMBC) and hosted by The Women’s Center and Student Life’s Mosaic Center, as part of Critical Social Justice: Baltimore 365.

I moderated a panel of guests including: the Rev. Dr. Heber Brown, III, Pastor of Pleasant Hope Baptist Church and Executive Director of Orita’s Cross Freedom School; Dr. Marisela B. Gomez, physician, community activist and author of Race, Class, Power, and Organizing in East Baltimore: Rebuilding Abandoned Communities in AmericaTawanda Jones, activist and sister of Tyrone West, who was killed by Baltimore police in July 2013; Jacqueline Robarge, Founder and Director of Power Inside, a project of Fusion Partnerships; and Kwame Rose, social activist and hip-hop artist.


Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake: The Future Of Baltimore

via Patrick Semansky for Associated PressOctober 26, 2015 – Segment 1

Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake joins me to share her vision for our city.


How Glamorizing Drugs Is Killing Black Youth

D. WatkinsOctober 21, 2015 – Hour 2

We listen back to highlights of some of the roundtables we have hosted that included D Watkins as a guest, including “How Glamorizing Drugs Is Killing Black Youth,” with: author, filmmaker and Coppin State University teacher D. Watkins; Michelle Antionette aka LOVE the Poet, poet, performance artist, and musician; Baltimore-based rappers DDm and Dez; and Dante Wilson, CEO and founder of Reclaiming Our Children and Community Project, Inc.


Interview with 2015 MacArthur “Genius” Award Winner, Ta-Nehisi Coates

October 20, 2015 – Segment 2

We listen to an encore presentation with Marc’s interview with 2015 MacArthur “Genius” Award Winner Ta-Nehisi Coates, national correspondent for The Atlantic and author of Between the World and Me and The Beautiful Struggle.

This week is the WEAA Fall Membership Drive, so tune in for compelling topics and wonderful premiums! Now is your opportunity to support the station you have come to love: WEAA, THE Voice of the Community. Call 410-319-8888 or visit weaa.org to make your pledge of support during the show.

Segment originally aired July 22, 2015. 


Gyasi Ross: Perspectives Of A Native American Activist

Gyasi Ross (Credit: CutBank Creek Press)October 19, 2015 – Segment 2

This week is the WEAA Fall Membership Drive, so tune in for compelling topics and wonderful premiums! Now is your opportunity to support the station you have come to love: WEAA, THE Voice of the Community. Call 410-319-8888 or visit weaa.org to make your pledge of support during the show.

I host a conversation with Gyasi Ross, father, writer, artist, attorney, member of the Blackfeet Tribe, and author of How To Say I Love You In Indian. We talk about the life and politics of America and racism, from the perspective of a Native American artist and activist.

Our co-host is Dr. Kaye Whitehead, Associate Professor of Communication and African and African American Studies at Loyola University Maryland, and author of Letters To My Black Sons: Raising Boys in a Post-Racial America.


The Last of These: An Examination Of Immigration Detention Centers In The US

October 16, 2015 – Segment 5Thelast

We present an archive edition of The Marc Steiner Show as we listen back to an interview with directors and producers of the documentary film The Least of These, which examines the realities of immigration detention centers across our country. With: Clark Lyda, Director and Producer of The Least of These; Jesse Lyda, Director and Producer of The Least of These; and Marcy Garriott, Producer of The Least of These.


Paul Rucker’s “Rewind” At The Baltimore Museum Of Art

October 16, 2015 – Segment 4
Paulrucker

We continue our exploration of local art as Marc travels to the Baltimore Museum of Art for another tour: artist and musician Paul Rucker‘s Rewind exhibition, which is one of the Baker Artist Awards exhibitions. Rewind touches on racism both in the past and today, and gained national attention when the Huffington Post featured the exhibit earlier this month.

The exhibition will be on view at the Baltimore Museum of Art until Nov. 15, 2015. More information is available here.


The Cold Cases Of The Jim Crow Era

October 16, 2015 – Segment 2JCrowcoldcase

Marc speaks with Margaret Russell, Law Professor at Santa Clara University, about her opinion piece “The Cold Cases of the Jim Crow Era”  which ran in the New York Times last August.  Russel sheds light on the unresolved cases of the hundreds of “disappeared”  Black men, women and children who were abducted and murdered during the height of the Jim Crow Era between 1930 – 1960.


#SayHerName: Teaching Young Girls to be Politically Conscious

sndblandOctober 15, 2015 – Segment 2

The plight of Black women who suffer violence and discrimination at the hands of the police, has largely been ignored, by the mainstream media and activists alike.  As recent events, particularly the July 13th death of Sandra Bland in police custody, have brought these issues to the fore, we steer our  conversation to how parents and educators are incorporating the living history of the Baltimore Uprising, #BlackLivesMatter and #SayHerName into lessons for their children and students, especially young girls of color. Sharing their thoughts are: Lisa Gray, Assistant Director of Student Life for Cultural and Spiritual Diversity at UMBC; and Dr. Anika Simpson, Associate Professor of Philosophy and Religious Studies and Coordinator of Women and Gender Studies Program at Morgan State University.


Dozens of Activists Occupy Baltimore City Hall Overnight

October 15, 2015 – Segment 1

Our show begins with an update of the events that unfolded last night after local activists occupied Baltimore’s City Hall following the confirmation hearing of newly appointed police commissioner, Kevin Davis. We are also updated on the status of those peaceful protesters who were arrested early this morning.   Guest host, Karsonya “Dr. Kaye” Wise Whitehead speaks with Dayvon Love, Director of Research and Public Policy for leaders of a Beautiful Struggle.

 


Tamir Rice, Police Accountability & the Freddie Gray Trials

www.flickr.com creative commonsOctober 14, 2015 – Segment 2

Today we look at the Cleveland investigations into the fatal police shooting of 12-year old Tamir Rice which concluded that a Cleveland police officer’s actions were “reasonable,” a conclusion that has spurred wide national outrage with: A. Dwight Pettit, Baltimore defense attorney who has represented clients in police misconduct cases; Tre Murphy, Organizer with Baltimore Algebra Project and Baltimore Bloc; and Kimberly Kindy, government accountability reporter for The Washington Post.


Justice or Else: Reflections on the 20th Anniversary of the Million Man March

October 13, 2015 – Segment 3Justice_OR_Else_255x360

Our panel reflects on the Million Man March 2o years on, and the role of the millennials in the modern movement.

Our panel of guests:  Malaika Aminata Clements, Morgan State University Print Journalism graduate and freelance life experiencer; Meshelle the Indie Mom of Comedy, former Open Society Institute-Baltimore Community Fellow and Founder of Goaldiggers, the Sankofa Project; Farajii Muhammad, Host of Listen Up! on WEAA 88.9-FM and member of the Nation of Islam; and Minister Carlos Muhammad, Baltimore representative for Minister Louis Farrakhan and Student Minister for Muhammad Mosque Number 6 in Baltimore.


The State Of Gilmor Homes Since The Baltimore Uprising

Gilmore Homes (Credit: BaltimoreSun)October 12, 2015 – Segment 4

We take a look at the current issues at Gilmor Homes, the housing project where Freddie Gray lived, in the months following Gray’s killing.

With: Eddie Conway, former Black Panther leader, former political prisoner, Producer at the Real News Network’s Baltimore Bureau, and co-author, with Domique Stevenson, of Marshall Law: The Life and Times of a Baltimore Black Panther; and Dominque Stevenson, Program Director for the American Friends Service Committee and co-author with Eddie Conway of Marshall Law: The Life and Times of a Baltimore Black Panther.


Tengella’s Take: My Black Life Matters Because I’m Black And Trying To Live It!

photo via Koli TengellaOctober 9, 2015 – Segment 1

It’s the latest edition of our weekly feature, Tengella’s Take with Koli Tengella. This week’s episode is called My Black Life Matters Because I’m Black And Trying To Live It! Koli is President of Tengella Edutainment, an instructor and creator of the Positive Social Change Performing Arts Program at Augusta Fells Savage Institute of Visual Arts High School, and he was a 2010 Open Society Institute Fellow.


Justice or Else: The 20th Anniversary of the Million Man March

Million Man March 1995 (Credit: Wikimedia - Yoke Mc / Joacim Osterstam)October, 7 2015 – Segment 2

We look at an upcoming event, Justice or Else: The 20th Anniversary of the Million Man March, which will take place in Washington, DC, on October 10. With: Farajii Muhammad, Host of Listen Up! on WEAA 88.9FM, co-director of the Justice of Else Baltimore Local Organizing Committee and member of the Nation of Islam.


Special West Wednesday Rally Outside Of Baltimore Central Booking & Intake Center

Tawanda Jones (Photo Credit: Megan Kenney on Twitter)October 6, 2015 – Segment 3

We check in on a special West Wednesday rally this Wednesday October 7th, 6:30pm, taking place outside of the Baltimore Central Booking and Intake Center at 300 E. Madison Street. The focus of the rally will be he death of Darrell Murray in prison and the police shooting of Keith Davis Jr.

With: Dayvon Love, Director of Research and Public Policy for Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle; and Tawanda Jones, activist and sister of Tyrone West, who was killed by Baltimore police in July 2013. Jones has organized West Wednesday protests every week for the past 2 years.


Remembering Activist & Civil Rights Pioneer Grace Lee Boggs (1915-2015)

Grace Lee Boggs (Photo Credit: Kyle McDonald on Flickr)October 6, 2015 – Segment 1

Activist, civil rights pioneer, writer, and public intellectual Grace Lee Boggs passed yesterday morning at the age of 100, at her home in Detroit. We begin our show with a remembrance and tribute to this remarkable woman. With: Sine Hwang Jensen, Asian American Studies Librarian at the Ethnic Studies Library at UC Berkeley; and adrienne maree brown, co-editor of Octavia’s Brood, sci-fi writer, and Emergent Strategy facilitator.


Returning To Art-Part’heid: Disparities in Baltimore’s Art Scene

Station North Arts and Entertainment DistrictOctober 1, 2015 – Segment 1

Dr. Kimberly Moffitt moderates a discussion on Art-Part’heid: Continuing The Conversation On Disparities in Baltimore’s Art Scene. The panel of guests will include: Sheila Gaskins, performance artist, poet, stand up comic, and Director of Theater Action Group; Nia Hampton, writer and filmmaker who wrote an Op-Alt in this week’s City Paper titled “Somos Todos Iguais” about her experiences watching the Baltimore Uprising as a Baltimorean in Brazil; and Mia Loving, Curator and Founder of Invisible Majority, a creative community incubator.


Talking About Race: Media Bias and Black Communities

via http://www.audaciousideas.org/2015/09/media-bias-in-black-communities/September 29, 2015 – Segment 2

We host a discussion on media bias and Black communities, with: Dr. Kimberly Moffitt, Associate Professor of American Studies at University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) and co-editor of Blackberries and Redbones: Critical Articulations of Black Hair/Body Politics in Africana Communities; Rashad Robinson, Executive Director of Color Of Change, the nation’s largest online civil rights organization; and Stacey Patton, reporter for The Chronicle of Higher Education.

You can see Robinson and Patton tonight at the Enoch Pratt Free Library as part of the Open Society Institute-Baltimore series “Talking About Race.” For more information, click here.


The Hip Hop Chronicles Presents: The People’s Climate Music “Act on Climate” Tour

(Photo Credit: People's Climate Music)September 25, 2015 – Segment 4

The award-winning Hip Hop Chronicles takes over the Marc Steiner Show with two very interesting conversations.

We broadcast a panel discussion presented by the Hip Hop Chronicles: the People’s Climate Music “Act on Climate” National Bus Tour Event at WEAA, featuring: Rev. Lennox Yearwood, Founder and CEO of the Hip Hop Caucus; Antonique Smith, Grammy nominated singer and actress; Star Brooks, author, motivational speaker and media personality; and Malik Yusef, five time Grammy Award winning spoken word artist, poet, musician, and producer.

 

The Hip Hop Chronicles is produced by Mike “Nyce” Middleton, one of our creative and talented colleagues at WEAA 88.9-FM. The show combines current and classic socially conscious music and conversation to address the political and social issues affecting the Hip-Hopgeneration, featuring in-depth conversations with political analysts, social activists, and community leaders. You can hear it weeknights frommidnight to 2AM on WEAA 88.9FM. 


Koli & Meshelle: Presidential Candidates, The State Of Our Society & More

Photo Credit: Marc Nozell on FlickrSeptember 25, 2015 – Segment 2

Koli Tengella, President of Tengella Edutainment and an instructor and creator of the Positive Social Change Performing Arts Program at Augusta Fells Savage Institute of Visual Arts High School, is joined by comedienne Meshelle the Indie Mom of Comedy for a cultural roundtable on the candidates for President, the state of our society and more.


Sir Hilary Beckles, CARICOM Reparations Chairman, On Slavery & Britain’s Black Debt

Britain's Black Debt (Photo Credit: The University of the West Indies Press)September 24, 2015 – Segment 1

We start with a conversation about slavery, reparations, and the Caribbean with Sir Hilary Beckles, Vice-Chancellor of the University of the West Indies, Chairman of the CARICOM Reparations Commission and author of Britain’s Black Debt: Reparations for Caribbean Slavery and Native Genocide.

 


The Significance Of Pope Francis’ Visit To The United States

Pope Francis (Photo Credit: Raffaele Esposito on Flickr)September 17, 2015 – Segment 1

We begin the show with a panel of guests who will discuss the upcoming visit of Pope Francis to the East Coast. With: E. Ethelbert Miller, poet and literary activist who serves on the Board of the Institute for Policy Studies; Ralph Moore, Program Manager for Restoration Gardens, a housing and resource development center for homeless youth in Southern Park Heights; and Patricia Shannon Jones, Director of the Immigration Outreach Service Center and leader of Women in Ministry at Baltimore’s St. Matthews Catholic Church.

Black Lives Matter: Structural Racism in 21st Century America

blacklivesmatterSeptember 16, 2015 – Segment 4

We preview this year’s Constitution Day Symposium, occurring on Thursday September 17th, co-sponsored by the Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA) and the American Civil Liberties Union of Maryland (ACLU-MD). The symposium topic is Black Lives Matter: Structural Racism in 21st Century America.

With: Reggie Shuford, American Civil Liberties Union of Pennsylvania Executive Director; and Dr. Firmin DeBrabander, professor of Philosophy at the Maryland Institute College of Art and author of Do Guns Make us Free: Democracy and the Armed Society.


The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution

The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the RevolutionSeptember 16, 2015 – Segment 3

We talk with filmmaker Stanley Nelson about his important new documentary The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolutionwhich examines the rise of the Black Panther Party in the 1960s and its impact on civil rights and American culture.


Reactions To ‘The Black Family in the Age of Mass Incarceration’

Ta-Nehisi Coates (Photo Credit: The Atlantic)September 16, 2015 – Segment 2

In our second segment our guests offer their review and analysis of Ta-Nehisi Coates’ article.

Our guests are Adar Ayira, Project Manager of the More in the Middle Campaign for Associated Black Charities and facilitator and analyst at Baltimore Racial Justice Action, a program of Fusion Partnerships; and Lenny McAllister, Republican strategist, former congressional candidate, and host of NightTalk: Get To The Point on the Pittsburgh cable news channel and Get Right with Lenny McAllister on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA in Pittsburgh.


Ta-Nehisi Coates: The Black Family in the Age of Mass Incarceration

Ta-Nehisi Coates (Photo Credit: The Atlantic)September 16, 2015 – Segment 1

We host a live interview with Ta-Nehisi Coates, national correspondent for The Atlantic and author of Between the World and Me and The Beautiful Struggle, who joins us to discuss his recent article for The Atlantic, “The Black Family in the Age of Mass Incarceration.”


Sound Bites: How We Define Organic Food | When Cultural Food Becomes “Trendy”

Ngau lam is Cantonese braised beef brisket, made with at least seven spices. (Photo Credit: Ruth Tam via Washington Post)September 10, 2015 – Segment 2

Join us for our newest episode of Sound Bites, our series on our food and our world. Today we look at organic food with Steve Savage, blogger and Agricultural Technology consultant; and Jay Martin, farmer at Provident Organic Farm.

We then interview Ruth Tam, Web Producer of The Kojo Nnamdi Show and contributor to She the People, about her recent article for the Washington Post: How it feels when white people shame your culture’s food – then make it trendy.”


David Simon & Bill Zorzi On ‘Show Me A Hero’

Photo Credit: HBO.comSeptember 4, 2015 – Segment 2

Did you watch the 6-part HBO miniseries Show Me A Hero? Even if you didn’t, you will want to hear my interview with the series’ co-writers David Simon and Bill Zorzi. Writer and journalist David Simon is a former Baltimore Sun reporter and creator of The Wire; journalist and screenwriter Bill Zorzi is a former Baltimore Sunreporter and wrote for The Wire.


Tengella’s Take: My Black Life Matters Because I’m Black And Trying To Live It!

Koli TengellaSeptember 4, 2015 – Segment 1

We begin the show with our weekly feature Tengella’s Takewith Koli Tengella. Koli is President of Tengella Edutainment, an instructor and creator of the Positive Social Change Performing Arts Program at Augusta Fells Savage Institute of Visual Arts High School, and he was a 2010 Open Society Institute Fellow.


The Black Lives Matter Movement & The Civil Rights Movement

Photo Credit: russell howze via FlickrSeptember 2, 2015 – Segment 1

We begin our show with a discussion about the Black Lives Matter movement and the Civil Rights Movement: differences, tensions, and connections. Our panel of guests will be responding in part to an op-ed in the Washington Post last week, written by Civil Rights activist Barbara Reynolds, “I was a civil rights activist in the 1960s. But it’s hard for me to get behind Black Lives Matter.”

Our panel will include: Kalima Young, Director of the Baltimore Art + Justice Project, a project of the Office of Community Engagement at the Maryland Institute College of Art; the Rev. Dr. Heber Brown, Pastor of Pleasant Hope Baptist Church and Executive Director of Orita’s Cross Freedom School; and John Milton Wesley, author, songwriter, and Senior Fellow in Social Marketing with the National Center for Health Behavioral Change at Morgan State University.


Local News Roundtable: Upcoming Trials Connected To Freddie Gray, Dirt Bikes In The City & Beyond

Baltimore City Courthouse. Photo credit: Jimmy Emerson, DVM via FlickrAugust 31, 2015 – Hour 2

On our Local News Roundtable we discuss the Freddie Gray trial, dirt bikes in the city, and beyond.

With: Dr. Lawrence Brown, public health consultant and Assistant Professor of Public Health in the School of Community Health and Policy at Morgan State University; political consultant Phil Tran; and Dr. Roni Ellington, Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at Morgan State University.


Reflecting On The 10 Years Since Hurricane Katrina

"Honoring Those Still Missing" (Photo Credit: Craig Morse via Flickr)August 28, 2015 – Segment 2

Listen to a special Marc Steiner Show / Center for Emerging Media presentation: 10 Years Since Hurricane Katrina. You will hear the diverse voices of a number of individuals from and/or living in the Crescent City, most of whom lived through the storm.

With: Tracie Washington, President of Louisiana Justice Institute; James Perry, New Orleanian and former Director of the Greater New Orleans Fair Housing Action Center; Jordan Flaherty, New Orleans-based journalist, author of the book Floodlines: Community and Resistance from Katrina to the Jena Six, and creator of the new short documentary film New Orleans: Recovery or Removal (which can be seen at GRITTV.org); Kristina Kay Robinson, writer, artist, and New Orleans native; Karen Gadbois, founder and reporter at The Lens, New Orleans’ first investigative news non-profit; Adam Karlin, freelance journalist and travel writer in New Orleans; Ellis Marsalis III, photographer and native New Orleanian; Tara Conley, Social Media Manager at Race Forward, Producer of Kellen and Katrina, and Brackish: A Visual Ethnography of Hurricane Katrina; and Kellen, musician and subject of the film Kellen and Katrina


Tengella’s Take: The NFL Delusion!

Koli TengellaAugust 28, 2015 – Segment 1

We begin the show with our weekly feature Tengella’s Take with Koli Tengella. Koli is President of Tengella Edutainment, an instructor and creator of the Positive Social Change Performing Arts Program at Augusta Fells Savage Institute of Visual Arts High School, and he was a 2010 Open Society Institute Fellow.


Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz: Continuing The Conversation On ‘An Indigenous People’s History Of The US’

An Indigenous People's History of the USAugust 21, 2015 – Segment 3

I talk with Native American author, historian, feminist, and self-described revolutionary Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, whose seminal book An Indigenous People’s History of the United States was just released in paperback.


Remembering Longtime Civil Rights Leader Julian Bond & The Critical Years Of The Civil Rights Movement

**FILE** This July 8, 2007 file photo shows NAACP Chairman Julian Bond addressing the civil rights organization's annual convention in Detroit. Bond says he will not seek re-election as chairman, a post he has held since 1998. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya, file)August 20, 2015 – Segment 1

Our guest host for the first hour is Dr. Lawrence Brown, public health consultant and Assistant Professor of Public Health in the School of Community Health and Policy at Morgan State University. We begin the show by remembering longtime Civil Rights leader Julian Bond, who died Sunday, and looking back at 1965 and 1966, which were critical years of the movement.

The panel of guests includes: Betty Robinson, former member of SNCC, co-editor of Hands on the Freedom Plow: Personal Accounts of Women in SNCC, and 2003 Open Society Institute Community Fellow; and Judy Richardson, former member of SNCC, filmmaker who worked on Eyes on the Prize, co-editor of Hands on the Freedom Plow: Personal Accounts by Women in SNCC, and board member of the SNCC Legacy Committee.


Baltimore Musicians of Color Discuss Race In the Music Scene

August 19, 2015 – Segment 3burney

We look at Lawrence Burney’s article in City Paper, “Race and Music in Baltimore: Baltimore musicians of color talk about race in the music scene.

With: Lawrence Burney, founder and editor of True Laurels; Spike Arreaga of the band Natural Velvet; and Afia Lydia of the band DaikonDaikon.

 


Black Lives Matter, Bernie Sanders & The Presidential Election

August 19, 2015 – Segment 1

blacklivesmatter

We begin the show with a roundtable discussion on the Black Lives Matter movement, Bernie Sanders, and the Presidential Election in collaboration with The Nation magazine.

With: Kai Wright, Features Editor for The Nation, where he wrote “Black Lives Matter Is a Demand, Not a Plea;” Farajii Muhammad, host of Listen Up! on WEAA 88.9 FM and Youth Empowerment Coordinator for the American Friends Service Committee in Baltimore; Washington State Senator Pramila Jayapal, who has represented District 37 in the Washington State Senate since January 2015 and who wrote “Why the Bernie Sanders Rally Left Me Heartbroken” for Huffington Post; and Ericka Blount Danois, award-winning journalist, writer, editor and professor who wrote “Bernie Sanders, Black Lives Matter and the Search for a Black Agenda” in The Root.


Upsurge In Violence In Baltimore With 208 Homicides & Governor Hogan’s Closing Of Baltimore City Detention Center

August 18, 2015 – Segment 2violence

We address the upsurge in violence in Baltimore. So far, there have been 208 homicides in Baltimore. The 2014 year-end total was 2011. What’s going on? And how do we address it?

With: Baltimore poet, writer and activist Avon Bellamy Sr.; and Tara Huffman, Director, Criminal and Juvenile Justice Program for OSI-Baltimore.

Then, Diamonte Brown, director of Out for Justice and co-chair of the Unlock the Vote Coalition; and Luke Broadwater, Reporter for the Baltimore Sun, also join the conversation to discuss Governor Hogan’s closing of the Baltimore City Detention Center.


Local News Roundtable: Rawlings-Blake V. Dixon, Dirt Bikes And Street Culture & More

August 17, 2015 – Segment 2blake

We bring the discussion home with a Local News Roundtable, topics to include: Rawlings-Blake v. Dixon for Mayor; dirt bikes, street culture and the police; murders in our city; and Are Baltimore schools ready for the start of the year?

With: Dr. Roni Ellington, Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at Morgan State University; Charles Robinson, Political and Business Correspondent For Maryland Public Television; Roberto Alejandro, reporter for Baltimore’s Afro-American newspaper; and longtime citizen activist Kim Trueheart.


National News Roundtable: Election 2016

August 17, 2015 – Segment 1debate

We begin the show with a National News Roundtable on Election 2016, topics including: the Republican Debate; Donald Trump’s comments on money and women; racial justice, O’Malley and Sanders; and Hillary Clinton and Black women.

With: Dr. Mileah Kromer, Director of the Sarah T. Hughes Field Politics Center and Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science and International Relations at Goucher College; Eugene Craig III, grassroots activist and 3rd Vice-Chair of the Maryland Republican State Party; and Edward Wyckoff Williams, Contributing Editor at The Root and Political Contributor and Special Correspondent with Al Jazeera America.


Sound Bites: The Launch Of The Black Church Food Security Network

Black Church Food Security NetworkAugust 13, 2015 – Segment 3

We listen back to a recent episode of Sound Bites, our series on our food and our world, about an exciting and important new initiative that was launched this summer in Baltimore: The Black Church Food Security Network. With: Bishop J. L. Carter, Pastor of the Ark Church; the Rev. Dr. Heber Brown, Pastor of Pleasant Hope Baptist Church and Executive Director of Orita’s Cross Freedom School; and the Rev. Darriel Harris, Project Officer of the Baltimore Food & Faith Project at Johns Hopkins’ Center for a Livable Future.

 


Textile Artist Sonya Clark: On Sculpting With Human Hair

Sonya ClarkAugust 13, 2015 – Segment 1

We begin the show with my 2009 interview with textile artist Sonya Clark, who had an exhibit at the Walters Art Museum featuring sculptures made of human hair. Do you run your hands happily through your lover’s hair, but cringe when you find one of their hairs on your pillow or in a dish they have prepared for you? Do you spend hundreds of dollars on fancy salons and designer gels and shampoos to achieve that “just rolled out of bed” look? Is your hair more important to you than you might like to admit? These are just a few of the tensions that Clark’s work evokes.

Philosopher’s Roundtable: Exploring Institutional Racism

jimAugust 11, 2015 – Segment 3

It’s another Philosopher’s Roundtable, on Defining and Exploring Institutional Racism. “Institutional racism” is a term often used but not often clearly defined. We look at its definition and historical roots, especially as they relate to today.

Our panel of guests includes: A. Adar Ayira, Project Manager of the More in the Middle Initiative at Associated Black Charities and facilitator and analyst at Baltimore Racial Justice Action, a program of Fusion Partnerships; Doug Colbert,University of Maryland Law School professor and co-chair of the Society of American Law Teachers’ (SALT) Access to Justice Curriculum Project; Michael Higginbotham, Wilson H. Elkins Professor of Law at the University of Baltimore, and author of Ghosts of Jim Crow: Ending Racism in “Post-Racial” America; and freelance media maker Maegan La Mala Ortiz.


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