The Marc Steiner Show

Racism

Marilyn Mosby Reopening Police Involved Killing Cases?

marilynmosbyJuly 28, 2015 – Segment 3

Last week Baltimore City Councilman Warren Branch called for State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby to reopen the cases of three black men who died in the custody of Baltimore Police during the last three years – Tyrone West, Anthony Anderson, and Maurice Johnson. In addition, the NAACP, ACLU, and other groups are calling for police reform in Baltimore. Our panel examines State’s Attorney Mosby’s first months in office and the possible responses from her office regarding these calls for change. With: Tom Maronick, Baltimore Attorney and Host of the Tom Moore show on AM 680 WCBM; and A. Dwight Pettit, Defense Attorney who has represented clients in police misconduct cases.

 


Talking About Race: Poll Shows Over 60% Of Americans Believe U.S. Race Relations Are Bad

Black Lives MatterJuly 27, 2015 – Segment 3

In light of the CBS News/New York Times poll released last week revealing that over 60% of Americans believe that race relations in the U.S. are bad, we take on this tough topic.

Our panel of guests includes: Baynard Woods, Editor at Large for the Baltimore City Paper; Catalina Byrd, media consultant and political strategist, and co-host of No Hooks for the Hip Hop Chronicles on WEAA 88.9 FM; Jodi Kelber-Kaye, Associate Director of the Honors College at UMBC; and Dr. Desiree H. Melton, Associate Professor of Philosophy in the School of Arts & Sciences at Notre Dame of Maryland University.


Sandra Bland And The #SayHerName Campaign

Sandra Bland, 28, was found dead Monday in a Waller County jail cell in Hempstead, Texas, after authorities said she hanged herself with a plastic trash bag. It is an act those close to her question.July 27, 2015 – Segment 2

We turn to the topic of Black women and the police, including Sandra Bland and the #SayHerName campaign. With: Dani McClain, Fellow at the Nation Institute.


The Experience Of Black Women In Academia

Dr. Bonnie Thornton-DillJuly 24, 2015 – Segment 5

We close out the show with a rebroadcast of last spring’s discussion on the topic of Black Women in Academia.

Our panel of guests includes: Dr. Bonnie Thornton Dill, Dean of Arts and Humanities at the University of Maryland, College Park; Dr. Pamela Scott Johnson, Interim Dean of College of Liberal Arts at Morgan State University; and Dr. Tara Bynum, Assistant Professor in the Department of English at Towson University.


Talking To Baltimore-Based Artist Loring Cornish

Loring CornishJuly 24, 2015 – Segment 3

We talk with Baltimore-based artist Loring Cornish about his inspirational new piece “Change for the Better” which was unveiled over the weekend at Artscape.


Wrestling With Ta-Nehisi Coates’ New Book ‘Between The World And Me’

Ta-Nehisi CoatesJuly 23, 2015 – Segment 2

Our guest host is Dr. Lester Spence, Center for Emerging Media Scholar-In-Residence, Associate Professor of Political Science and Africana Studies at Johns Hopkins University, and author of the forthcoming Knocking the Hustle: Against the Neoliberal Turn in Black Politics.

In follow-up to Marc’s discussion yesterday with Ta-Nehisi Coates on his new book Between the World and Me, we continue the discussion on this important and compelling book. The panel of guests includes: Dr. Karsonya “Kaye” Wise Whitehead, Assistant Professor of Communication and Affiliate Assistant Professor of African and African American Studies at Loyola University Maryland, the author of several books, including Letters to My Black Sons: Raising Boys in a Post-Racial America and the award-winning Notes From A Colored Girl: The Civil War Pocket Diaries of Emile Frances Davis, and writer of a review of Between the World and Me in the Baltimore Sun; Dr. Kimberly Moffitt, Associate Professor of American Studies at University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) and co-editor of Blackberries and Redbones: Critical Articulations of Black Hair/Body Politics in Africana Communities; and D. Watkins, Salon.com writer and author of the forthcoming The Beast Side: Living and Dying While Black in America.


#BaltimoreTRANSuprising Rally & March To Uplift Voices Of Transgender Baltimoreans

Baltimore Trans UprisingJuly 22, 2015 – Segment 4

Anthony McCarthy, host of The Anthony McCarthy Show on WEAA 88.9FM, sits in as guest host. We talk about the #BaltimoreTRANSuprising rally and march happening this Friday at 5:00pm at Charles and North. The rally and march are meant to lift up voices of transgender people in Baltimore.

We’re joined by Bryanna Jenkins, lead organizer for #BaltimoreTRANSUprising and founding member of the Baltimore Transgender Alliance; Monica Stevens Yorkman, community activist from Sistas of the T and part of the Baltimore Trans Alliance; and Vann Michael, Black Transmen Inc. Maryland/DC Chapter representative, and local advocate who pens the “Real Trans Talk” column for Baltimore OUTloud. 


Ta-Nehisi Coates: Between the World and Me

coatesJuly 22, 2015 – Segment 2

TaNehisi Coates joins us to discuss his new book, Between the World and Me. Coates is national correspondent at The Atlantic, where he writes about culture, politics, and social issues.

 


Anti-Black Racism, Trauma and Mental Health

fulliloveJuly 21, 2015 – Segment 4

We turn to the topic of the psychological impact of anti-Black racism, trauma and more by talking about the Black Mental Health Alliance. With: Dr. Mindy Fullilove, Professor of Clinical Psychiatry and Public Health at Columbia University; Michael Scott, Chief Equity Officer, President and Co-Founder of Equity Matters; Jan Desper, Executive Director of the Black Mental Health Alliance; and Maurissa Stone Bass, Director of The Living Well.

 

The Black Mental Health Alliance is launching its new innovative model of community engagement and transformative planning designed to infuse mental health strategies and solutions into the current and longstanding challenges facing Baltimore City. From July 2015 to June 2016, BMHA will convene national thought leaders, researchers and scholars who will share their knowledge and recommendations around the issues of education, housing, criminal justice, and more. The inaugural event of this series will feature Dr. Mindy Thompson Fullilove on Thursday, July 23, 2015. Dr. Fullilove helps cities neutralize the effects of policies detrimental to communities such as mass incarceration, planned shrinkage, disinvestment, and deindustrialization by undertaking deliberate actions to improve quality of life.


Roundtable: Sandra Bland, Chattanooga Shooting, and More

sandrabland2July 20, 2015 – Segment 2

We host a round table discussion addressing the headlines of the past week, including the shooting at a military recruitment center in Chattanooga, Tennessee, and the death of Sandra Bland in a jail cell in Waller County, Texas. With: Megan Sherman, Producer at The Real News Network; Dr. Richard Vatz, Professor of Rhetoric and Communication at Towson University’s Department of Instructional Leadership and Professional Development and author of The Only Authentic Book of Persuasion: The Salience-Agenda/Meaning-Spin Model; and Anthony McCarthy, Host of the Anthony McCarthy Show on WEAA 88.9-FM.


Tengella’s Take: What’s Up With Google?

Koli TengellaJuly 17, 2015 – Segment 4

Listen to our weekly feature, Tengella‘s Take with Koli Tengella. Koli is President of Tengella Edutainment, an instructor and creator of the Positive Social Change Performing Arts Program at Augusta Fells Savage Institute of Visual Arts High School, and was a 2010 Open Society Institute Fellow.

 


Remembering Tyrone West, Baltimore Man Who Died In Police Custody 2 Years Ago

Tawanda JonesJuly 17, 2015 – Segment 3

We remember Tyrone West, the Baltimore man who died while under police custody on July 18, 2013, in Northeast Baltimore.

With: Tawanda Jones, activist and sister of Tyrone West who has been organizing West Wednesday protests every week for the last 2 years. This Saturday, July 18, at 5pm, the West family will gather at the intersection of Kitmore & Kelway, in Northeast Baltimore, where the incident all began, and the public is invited.


Talking Culture With Koli & Meshelle: Who Should Be On The $10 Bill?

Shirley ChisholmJuly 17, 2015 – Segment 2

Koli Tengella, President of Tengella Edutainment, an instructor and creator of the Positive Social Change Performing Arts Program at Augusta Fells Savage Institute of Visual Arts High School is joined by comedienne Meshelle, the Indie Mom of Comedy, for a Cultural Roundtable discussion. Their topics include: the Confederate flag, Rachel Dolezal, and Who should be on the $10 bill?


Sound Bites: The Black Church Food Security Network

foodJuly 16, 2015 – Segment 3

In our latest episode of Sound Bites, our series on our food and our world, we take a look at an exciting and important new initiative that was just launched in Baltimore: The Black Church Food Security Network. With: Bishop J. L. Carter, Pastor of the Ark Church; the Rev. Dr. Heber Brown, Pastor of Pleasant Hope Baptist Church and Executive Director of Orita’s Cross Freedom School; and the Rev. Darriel Harris, Project Officer of the Baltimore Food & Faith Project at Johns Hopkins’ Center for a Livable Future.

 


Can Communication Bring Police & Community Together In Baltimore?

Jean LloydJuly 15, 2015 – Segment 5

We check-in on a Town Hall on Police-Community Relations taking place next week at the Real News Network Studios in Baltimore.

With: Karim Ali, Executive Producer of Vision View Media Group and co-Founder of Creating A Profound Sense of Community [CAPSOC]; Omar Henderson, Executive Producer of Vision View Media Group; and Jean Lloyd, President of Jean Lloyd and Associates.


Breaking Down Recent Events: Police-Community Relations Across the United States & More

March in MississippiJuly 15, 2015 – Segment 2

We discuss recent events to include the alleged strangling by a police officer of Jonathan Sanders, a 39-year-old unarmed Mississippi man.

With: A. Adar Ayira, Project Manager of the More in the Middle Campaign for Associated Black Charities (ABC) and facilitator and analyst at Baltimore Racial Justice Action, a program of Fusion Partnerships; Denzel Mitchell, founder of Five Seeds Family Farm and Apiary; and A. Rod Womack, author of Redwood and former owner of the Redwood Grill in Baltimore.


The Firing of Pokomoke City Police Chief Kelvin Sewel

kelvin-sewellJuly 14, 2015 – Segment 3

We take a look at Maryland’s Eastern Shore, where Pokomoke City Police Chief Kelvin Sewell was fired because he refused to terminate two Black members of his agency, according to his attorney. Sewell and the two other officers have filed Equal Employment Opportunity Commission complaints alleging a hostile racial environment. With: Delegate Jill Carter (41st District, Baltimore City); and Stephen Janis, Investigative Journalist for the Real News Network.


Two Years After the George Zimmerman Verdict: What’s Changed?

Emmet Till, Trayvon MartinJuly 13, 2015 – Segment 3

Two years ago, on July 13, 2013, George Zimmerman was found not guilty in the death of Trayvon Martin. We ask the question, Two Years After the George Zimmerman Verdict: What’s Changed? 

With: Dr. Lester Spence, Center for Emerging Media Scholar-In-Residence and Associate Professor of Political Science and Africana Studies at Johns Hopkins University; Dr. Desiree Melton, Associate Professor of Philosophy and Associate Director of the APA Site Visit Program in the School of Arts & Sciences at Notre Dame of Maryland University; and Dr. John Bullock, Professor of Political Science at Towson University and candidate for Baltimore City Council in the Ninth District.


From The Archives: Ending Segregation & Fighting For Civil Rights In Cambridge, Maryland

Arrest in Cambridge, Maryland - 1963July 10, 2015 – Segment 5

We present a special archive edition of The Marc Steiner Show, commemorating the 52nd anniversary of the desegregation of Cambridge, Maryland. Residents Enez Stafford-Grubbs, Betty Jackson, and Francine Woolford joined us to share their memories of the struggle for civil rights, an end to segregation, and better living conditions in their hometown on the Eastern Shore of Maryland.


Tengella’s Take: Think Twice About Celebrating The 4th Of July

4th of JulyJuly 10, 2015 – Segment 2

It’s a new Tengella’s Take, our weekly feature when actor, educator, and activist Koli Tengella offers his thoughts on our world today. This week’s segment is on the 4th of July.  Koli is President of Tengella Edutainment, an instructor & creator of the Positive Social Change Theater/Performing Arts Program at Augusta Fells Savage Institute of Visual Arts High School, and was a 2010 Open Society Institute Fellow.


Sound Bites: The Native & Black Roots Of American Barbecue | Whole Foods In The Spotlight For Massive Overcharging & Organic Rating System

Michael TwittyJuly 9, 2015 – Segment 3

On the newest episode of our series on our food and our world, Sound Bites, we begin with a fascinating look at the history of barbecue with Michael Twitty, Culinary Historian of African and African American Foodways and blogger at Afroculinaria, based on his recent article for The Guardian, “Barbecue is an American tradition – of enslaved Africans and Native Americans.”

We close the show with a look of Whole Foods, in light of recent allegations of their massive overcharging and complaints from organic farmers about their rating system. With Denzel Mitchell, Founder of Five Seeds Family Farm and Apiary.


Multi-City Meeting For Families Victimized By Police Violence

Tawanda JonesJuly 8, 2015 – Segment 3

We talk to activist Tawanda Jones, sister of Tyrone West — who was killed by Baltimore Police while in police custody — about a multi-city meeting taking place that includes families who have experienced police violence. Tawanda Jones has been organizing West Wednesday protests every week for the past two years since her brother was killed.

 

 


Update From The Freddie Gray Protest Legal Team

Freddie Gray protestJuly 8, 2015 – Segment 2

We get an update from the Freddie Gray protest legal team, with Iman Freeman, volunteer with the Baltimore Legal Action Committee.

 


From The Archives: Cultural Roundup on Black Girls Matter, McKinney, Texas & More

McKinney, TexasJune 26, 2015 – Segment 5

We rebroadcast of a powerful show with guest host Dr. Karsonya “Kaye” Whitehead: A Cultural Roundup on Black Girls Matter, McKinney, Texas and More. Our panel of guests discusses the Black Girls Matter movement, Caitlyn Jenner and representations of trans women in the media, and the death of Mya Hall, the transgender woman killed outside of the NSA on March 30th. With: the Rev. Merrick Moise, ordained minister, writer, community activist and teacher, and one of the first African Americans ordained within the Old Catholic Movement in Baltimore; Dr. Tara Bynum, Assistant Professor in the Department of English at Towson University; Michelle Antoinette AKA LOVE the Poet, indie spoken word artist and musician, and author of Black Marks on White Paper; and Kalima Young, Director of the Baltimore Art + Justice Project, a project of the Office of Community Engagement at the Maryland Institute College of Art.

Dr. Kaye Whitehead is Assistant Professor of Communication and Affiliate Assistant Professor of African and African American Studies at Loyola University Maryland, and the author of several books, including the recently released Letters to My Black Sons: Raising Boys in a Post-Racial America, and the award-winning Notes From A Colored Girl: The Civil War Pocket Diaries of Emile Frances Davis.


Tengella’s Take: Where Is The “Love” America?

Koli TengellaJune 26, 2015 – Segment 2

It’s our weekly feature, Tengella’s Take, with actor, comedian and educator Koli Tengella. This week Koli’s topic is Where Is The “Love” America?, a commentary on the racist shooting in Charleston, South Carolina.

Koli is President of Tengella Edutainment, an instructor and creator of the positive social change performing arts program at Augusta Fells Savage Institute of Visual Arts High School, and was a 2010 Open Society Institute Fellow.  


Sound Bites: Building a Model for Food and Jobs in Sandtown-Winchester

Good Food Gathering in SandtownJune 25, 2015 – Segment 4

It’s the newest episode of our series on our food and our world, Sound Bites. This week we bring you the first part of our Good Food Gathering town hall meeting held June 16 in partnership with Hopkins’ Baltimore Food and Faith Project, titled Sandtown: Building a Model for Food and Jobs. The town hall took place at Jubilee Arts, located in the Sandtown Winchester neighborhood of Baltimore, which was at the center of the Baltimore Uprising and was the neighborhood where Freddie Gray lived and was arrested.

The panel was comprised of three members of the faith community who are working on food and employment issues in interesting and effective ways: Elder C.W. Harris of Strength to Love II Farm and Newborn Holistic Ministries; Antoine Bennet of New Song Community Church; and Melissa Kelly of the No Boundaries Coalition.

 


Maryland Historical Society Collecting Baltimore Uprising Artifacts

Baltimore Youth: We Are Not ThugsBaltimore Youth: We Are Not ThugsJune 25, 2015 – Segment 3

Dr. Lester Spence, Center for Emerging Media Scholar-In-Residence and Associate Professor of Political Science and Africana Studies at Johns Hopkins University sits in for Marc this hour.

Joe Tropea, Digital Projects Coordinator for the Maryland Historical Society (MDHS), joins Lester to discuss MDHS’s new project to collect footage and images of the Baltimore Uprising.


Analyzing The Leaked Freddie Gray Autopsy Findings

Freddie GrayJune 25, 2015 – Segment 2

Dr. Lester Spence, Center for Emerging Media Scholar-In-Residence and Associate Professor of Political Science and Africana Studies at Johns Hopkins University sits in for Marc this hour.

Today the Baltimore Sun released results of the autopsy report of Freddie Gray, which indicate that he suffered from a “high-energy injury” to his neck and spine. We talk about the medical examiner’s report and what this new information means for the case. With: D. Watkins, author, filmmaker and professor at Coppin State University; and Tim Wilson, co-Director of On Our Shoulders and the new Vice Chair of the NAACP Criminal Justice Committee.


Symbols Of The Confederacy: Important Relics Of History Or Outdated Monuments Of Hate

Lee Jackson Statue in BaltimoreJune 24, 2015 – Segment 2

As the Confederate flag is still flying on the South Carolina Capitol grounds, we have a discussion about the symbolism and meaning of flying that flag, as well as monuments to the Confederacy in Baltimore and beyond.

We are joined by Zoe Carpenter, The Nation‘s Assistant Washington Editor, who wrote a blog post “A History of Hate Rock From Johnny Rebel to Dylann Roof“; Yoni Appelbaum, a senior editor at The Atlantic, where he oversees the Politics section and wrote article titled “Why Is The Flag Still There“; Chris Roberts, advocate and a doctoral student and instructor in the African American Studies Department at Temple University; Dr. Tara Bynum, assistant professor of English at Towson University; and Evan Serpick, Editor of the City Paper, wrote the article “Stop Honoring White Supremacy” and started an online petition to change the name of Robert E. Lee Park.


The American Dream on Hold: Economic Challenges in the African American Community

baltimoreJune 22, 2015 – Segment 3

Congressman G. K. Butterfield, Chairman of the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC), Congresswoman Carolyn B. Maloney, Ranking Democrat on the U.S. Congress Joint Economic Committee (JEC), and Congressman Elijah E. Cummings, Ranking Member of the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform join us to discuss a public forum and press conference on the impact of economic challenges and persistent inequities facing African American communities across the country. They join us on the show to speak about that, TPP, and Charleston.


Reflecting on the Shooting at Emanuel AME in Charleston

charlestonJune 22, 2015 – Segment 2

We discuss the massacre at Emanuel AME in Charleston, with: Dani McClain, fellow at the Nation Institute; Dr. Karsonya “Kaye” Wise Whitehead, Assistant Professor of Communication and Affiliate Assistant Professor of African and African American Studies at Loyola University Maryland, and the author of several books, including the recently released Letters to My Black Sons: Raising Boys in a Post-Racial America, and the award-winning Notes From A Colored Girl: The Civil War Pocket Diaries of Emile Frances Davis; Dr. Lawrence Brown of Morgan State University; and Dr. Douglas Egerton, Professor of History at Le Moyne College.


What Fanon Said: A Philosophical Introduction To His Life And Thought

Frantz FanonJune 19, 2015 – Segment 5

We close the show with a conversation with internationally renowned interpreter of Franz Fanon’s works, Lewis R. Gordon about his latest book What Fanon Said: A Philosophical Introduction To His Life And Thought.


YES! Magazine Podcasts: His Ancestors Were Slave Traders and Hers Were Slaves

His Ancestors Were Slave Traders and Hers Were Slaves. What They Learned About Healing from a RoadtripJune 19, 2015 – Segment 4

Listen to one of our new regular features in partnership with Yes! Magazine, based on their Make It Right issue. We talk to two of their contributing writers who tell an interesting story: His ancestors were slave traders and hers were slaves. The two went on a roadtrip together, and this is what they learned.

With Sharon Leslie Morgan and Thomas Norman DeWolf, who co-authored Gather at the Table: The Healing Journey of a Daughter of Slavery and a Son of the Slave Trade. Sharon is a pioneer in multicultural marketing and a founder of the National Black Public Relations Society. She is founder of OurBlackAncestry.com. Tom is the author of Inheriting the Trade. He is Executive Director for Coming to the Table, a STAR Practitioner, and a Certified Trainer for “Infinite Possibilities: The Art of Changing Your Life.”


YES! Magazine Podcasts: Make it Right Issue

YES! Magazine - Make It RightJune 19, 2015 – Segment 3

Listen to one of our new regular features in partnership with Yes! Magazine, based on their Make It Right issue. We begin with Sarah Van Gelder, co-Founder and Editor-in-Chief of YES! Magazine and YesMagazine.org.


Tengella’s Take: Being Black Is So Easy, Even A White Women Can Do It!

Rachel DolezalJune 19, 2015 – Segment 2

It’s our weekly feature Tengella‘s Take with actor, comedian and educator Koli Tengella. This week, Koli‘s topic is Rachel Dolezal. Koli is President of Tengella Edutainment, an instructor and creator of the positive social change performing arts program at Augusta Fells Savage Institute of Visual Arts High School, and was a 2010 Open Society Institute Fellow


National Roundtable: Emanuel AME Shooting | Presidential Election

charlestonJune 18, 2015 – Segment 2

We have a national roundtable on the attack on Emanuel AME in Charleston and the presidential election with guest host Dr. Karsonya “Kaye” Whitehead, Assistant Professor of Communication and Affiliate Assistant Professor of African and African American Studies at Loyola University Maryland, and author of Notes From a Colored Girl: The Civil War Pocket Diaries of Emile Frances Davis and My Black Sons: Raising Boys in a Post-Racial America. The panelists are: Charles Robinson, political and business correspondent for Maryland Public Television; and Richard Vatz, Professor of Rhetoric and Communication at Towson University’s Department of Instructional Leadership and Professional Development.

 


Haitian Migrant Workers In The Dominican Republic Facing Deportation

Haitian migrant workers in Dominican RepublicJune 17, 2015 – Segment 4

We turn to the Dominican Republic, where hundreds of thousands of migrant workers, 90% of whom are Haitian, are facing deportation.

With: Ezili Danto, President of the Haitian Lawyers Leadership Network in New York; Dr. Ray Winbush, Director of the Institute for Urban Research at Morgan State University; Silvio A Torres-Saillant, Professor of English at Syracuse University, former head of the Latino-Latin American Studies Program in the College of Arts and Sciences at Syracuse, and Founder of La Casita Cultural Center and the CUNY Dominican Studies Institute; and Dr. Kiran Jayaram, faculty member in the Department of History and Philosophy at the York College of the City University of New York.


In Baltimore, Black Women And Girls’ Lives Matter

Black Women and Girls Lives MatterJune 15, 2015 – Segment 3

We look at #BlackWomenandGirlsLivesMatter, with: Kalima Young, Director of the Baltimore Art + Justice Project, a project of the Office of Community Engagement at the Maryland Institute College of Art; A. Adar Ayira, Project Manager of the More in the Middle Campaign for Associated Black Charities and facilitator and analyst at Baltimore Racial Justice Action, a program of Fusion Partnerships; Lenora Knowles, Amorous Ebony, and Emelda De Coteau, and organizers of the #BlackWomenandGirlsLiveMatter Rekia’s Rally March / Protest that is happening this Saturday and Sunday, June 20 & 21.


Cultural Roundtable: From Spokane To Baltimore

Rachel DolezalJune 15, 2015 – Segment 2

We begin the show with a roundtable discussion on analyses of a number of top news stories, including the Spokane NAACP’s Rachel Dolezal scandal and the rough handling of Black teens at a pool party by police in McKinney, Texas.

With: Rahne Alexander, Baltimore-based artist and arts organizer; Kalima Young, Director of the Baltimore Art + Justice Project, a project of the Office of Community Engagement at the Maryland Institute College of Art; A. Adar Ayira, Project Manager of the More in the Middle Campaign for Associated Black Charities and facilitator and analyst at Baltimore Racial Justice Action, a program of Fusion Partnerships; and ER Shipp, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, Journalist-in-Residence and Associate Professor of Journalism at Morgan State University.


Roundtable on Prisons, Policing, and Community Responses

Kalief BrowderJune 10, 2015 – Segment 2

We host a roundtable discussion on recent headlines involving violence, prison, policing, and community solutions, including: the suicide last Saturday of Kalief Browder, who spent 3 years without trial as a teenager on Rikers Island before his release in 2013; the freeing of Angola 3 member Albert Woodfox after 43 years in solitary confinement; violence in Baltimore; and initiatives in Sandtown. Our panel of guests includes: Maryland State Delegate Jill P. Carter (District 41); JC Faulk, community organizer and community development consultant; Mia Loving, curator and founder of Invisible Majority, a creative community incubator; and Michael Scott, chief equity officer/president and co-founder of Equity Matters.


Baltimore Experiencing Highest Murder Rate In 40 Years: Crime and Policing in Baltimore

policeJune 1, 2015 – Segment 3

We take an intensive look at issues of crime and policing in Baltimore. In May, Baltimore experienced the highest murder rate in a single month in 40 years.

First, we talk with individuals who were former police and/or are involved in work with issues of criminal justice. Our panel of guests includes: Lt. Kenneth Butler, President of Vanguard Justice Society; retired Major Neill Franklin, Executive Director of Law Enforcement Against Prohibition; and Samuel Walker, Emeritus Professor of Criminal Justice at the University of Nebraska at Omaha, and author of Presidents and Civil Liberties: From Wilson to Obama and arecent report on the Baltimore City Police Department’s contract with the FOP.

Then we shift gears a bit and talk with community leaders and advocates about concrete solutions to the issues of crime and policing in the community. With:Imhotep Fatiu, Executive Director of Urban Youth Initiative Project and author ofUrBan Philosophy; the Rev. Dr. Heber Brown, Pastor of Pleasant Hope Baptist Church and Executive Director of Orita’s Cross Freedom School; Doug Ward, Director of of Johns Hopkins University’s Division of Public Safety Leadership; and Kimberly Armstrong, community advocate, author, and speaker, who was awarded the Spirit of Woman Award.


From The Archives: Art-Part’heid — Bridging the Gap of Disparities in the Baltimore Art Scene

artpartMay 29, 2015 – Segment 4

We bring you a special archive edition of The Marc Steiner Show as we listen back to Art-Part’heid: Bridging the Gap of Disparities in the Baltimore Art Scene, a panel discussion and community dialogue on race, power, privilege, exclusion and shared wealth. With: Mia Loving, Curator and Founder of Invisible Majority, a creative community incubator; Michelle Gomez, independent curator who works collaboratively with under-represented audiences on community-focused exhibitions in Baltimore; Sophia Mak, artist, dancer, performer, educator, and activist; and Abdu Ali, artist and musician.

 


Dr. Lester Spence: Black History, Policing & The Black Left

Black history and policingMay 28, 2015 – Segment 2

Our guest host is Dr. Lester Spence, Center for Emerging Media Scholar-In-Residence and Associate Professor of Political Science and Africana Studies at Johns Hopkins University. The topic is Black history and policing, with Daryl Scott, Professor of History and Chair of the Department of History at Howard University and outgoing President of the Association for the Study of African American Life.


Sound Bites: Baltimore Uprising and Food Sovereignty

 afyaMay 21, 2015 – Segment 4

In the latest installment of our series about our food and our world, Sound Bites, we look at the connection between food insecurity in Baltimore and what has come to be known as the Baltimore Uprising, the demonstrations and violence that occurred after the death of Freddie Gray.

We begin the discussion with Michael Twitty, Culinary Historian of African and African American Foodways and blogger at Afroculinaria.

And then we continue this topic with a number of young farmers who  joined us for a roundtable discussion: Walker Marsh, Founder and owner of the Flower Factory; Sache Jones, Food Justice Consultant for the Park Heights Community Health Alliance and Manager of the AFYA Community Teaching Garden in Park Heights; and Blain Snipstal, returning generation farmer on the Eastern Shore of Maryland at Black Dirt Farm.

 


Tengella’s Take: Fear of a Pinstripe Suit

koliMay 15, 2015 – Segment 2

We introduce a new segment, Tengella’s Take, featuring commentary from Koli Tengella, President of Tengella Edutainment, 2010 Open Society Institute Community Fellow, and Executive Director of the Kujichaglia Project . Tengella teaches his program at the Augusta Fells Savage Institute of Visual Arts High where he uses theater, film and new media for positive social change.


Baltimore Orioles Fans Mock Black Lives Matter Movement

Our Birds MatterMay 12, 2015 – Segment 3

We discuss the Orioles and some of the signs held by the team’s fans that mocked the Black Lives Matter movement and protests for justice for Freddie Gray with Milton Kent, Host of Sports At Large with Milton Kent on WYPR and Lecturer in the Department of Multimedia Journalism in the School of Global Journalism and Communication at Morgan State University.


Continuing the Momentum of the Baltimore Uprising

bmore

bmore

May 11, 2015 – Segment 3

We continue our discussion on the Baltimore Uprising, and ask how the momentum and unity of the past few weeks can be continued. We’ll ask how local activists can use resources, attention and energy that are pouring into the city right now? Do we need to be wary of the attention we’re getting? Are there lessons to be learned from Ferguson?

Our panel of guests includes: Marshall “Eddie” Conway, former Black Panther who was released from prison in 2014 after being incarcerated for 44 years, co-author ofMarshall Law: The Life and Times of a Baltimore Black Panther, and staff member ofThe Real News Network‘s Baltimore Bureau; Jessica Lewis, housing organizer at the Right to Housing Alliance (RTHA); Gary Stroud, resident of Bernard E. Mason and member of the RTHA leadership council; Elder CW Harris, Pastor at Newborn Community of Faith and Founder of Newborn Ministries Inc., which created Martha’s Place, Jubilee Arts, Strength to Love II, and Strength to Love Farm in Sandtown-Winchester; and Farajii Muhammad, host of Listen Up! on WEAA and Youth Empowerment Coordinator for the American Friends Service Committee in Baltimore.

 


Bias in Baltimore Bail Hearings?

baltimorecityMay 11, 2015 – Segment 2

We talk with Todd H. Oppenheim, felony trial attorney in the Office of the Public Defender, about his recent op-ed for the Baltimore Brew titled, “The bias in Baltimore bail hearings: a presumption of guilt.”


Sound Bites: Good Food Gathering — Keeping The Tradition Of African American Farming Alive

African American farmersMay 7, 2015 – Segment 3

On a new episode of Sound Bites, we broadcast of a very lively town hall meeting held on March 23 – one of our “Good Food Gatherings” in partnership with Baltimore Food & Faith Project – in which our panel of guests and the audience engaged in a discussion following a screening of the movie Homecoming, about the history of Black farmers in the U.S. Our panel of guests includes: Rev. Dr. Heber Brown, Pastor of Pleasant Hope Baptist Church and Executive Director of Orita’s Cross Freedom School; Aleya Fraser, educator and co-manager of an Eastern Shore Farm; Dwayne Cousar, founder of Brooklyn Greenhouse Community; and Lavette Blue, co-founder/manager of The Greener Garden.


In Baltimore and Across the Country, Black Faces In High Places Haven’t Helped Average Black People

BALTIMORE, MD - MAY 01: Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake of Baltimore speaks at a press conference after it was announced that charges will be filed against Baltimore police officers in the death of Freddie Gray on May 1, 2015 in Baltimore, Maryland. Gray died in police custody after being arrested on April 12, 2015. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)May 7, 2015 – Segment 1

Our guest host is Dr. Karsonya “Kaye” Wise Whitehead, Assistant Professor of Communication and Affiliate Assistant Professor of African and African American Studies at Loyola University Maryland.

We begin the hour with Dr. Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, Assistant Professor in Princeton University’s Center for African American Studies, who talks about her article last week in In These Times: “In Baltimore and Across the Country, Black Faces in High Places Haven’t Helped Average Black People: Electing African-American political leaders has done little to alleviate the suffering of Black America.”


Baltimore Protests and Police Brutality in Historical Context

baltimore2May 6, 2015 – Segment 3

We take a look at Baltimore’s history and put the events of the past several weeks into that context. With: Dr. Lawrence Brown, activist, public health consultant, and Assistant Professor of Public Health in the School of Community Health and Policy at Morgan State University; and Antero Pietila, author of Not in my Neighborhood: How Bigotry Shaped a Great American City.

 


Congressman Elijah Cummings on Protests and More

elijah cummingsMay 6, 2015 – Segment 2

Congressman Elijah Cummings joins us to talk about the events following the death of Freddie Gray and steps to move Baltimore forward. He and Senator Elizabeth Warren will hold a “Middle Class Prosperity Project” Forum in Baltimore on Predatory Financial Practices and Economic Injustice on Monday, May 11, 2015 1 pm — 2:30 pm at the University of Maryland Carey School of Law Ceremonial Courtroom, 500 W. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201.


Where Does Baltimore Go From Here?

protest baltimoreMay 5, 2015 – Segment 2

We continue our discussion of “Where does Baltimore go from here?” as the city begins to heal and move forward, with a focus on issues of poverty and upward mobility. We also ask if “Black culture” is a problem.

With: the Rev. Todd Yeary, Senior Pastor of the Douglas Memorial Community Church; Jessica Lewis, housing organizer at the Right to Housing Alliance; Dr. N.D.B. Connolly, Assistant Professor in the Department of History at Johns Hopkins University and author of A World More Concrete: Real Estate and the Remaking of Jim Crow South; and Diane Bell McKoy, President and Chief Executive Officer of Associated Black Charities.


The Hip-Hop Chronicles: On #FreddieGray & Baltimore’s Curfew

Baltimore curfewMay 1, 2015 – Segment 2

We broadcast an exceptional audio experience produced by Mike “Nyce” Middleton, one of our creative and talented colleagues at WEAA 88.9-FM: a special edition of The Hip-Hop Chronicles. The show combines current and classic socially conscious music and conversation to address the political and social issues affecting the Hip-Hop generation, featuring in-depth conversations with political analysts, social activists, and community leaders.

We especially wanted to showcase this episode of the Hip-Hop Chronicles because it addresses what’s happening in Baltimore in this moment. I also had the pleasure of being interviewed in one of the segments. The show airs Monday through Fridayfrom midnight to 2:00am.


Special Presentation: Voices From The Freddie Gray Protests

Voices of the Freddie Gray protestMay 1, 2015 – Segment 1

We begin the show with a special production, Voices from the Freddie Gray Protests, from our Marc Steiner Show producers Mark Gunnery and Stefanie Mavronis who have been out with the protesters throughout the week.

You will hear from: Nyasha Dixon, Ralikh Hayes, Paul Rucker, Willa Bickham, Brendan Walsh, Rev. Dr. Heber Brown III, Molly Amster, Minister Carlos Muhammad, Dayvon Love, Touré, Dr. Lawrence Brown, Cordy Shaw, Person Ablach, students from Goucher, Councilpersons Carl Stokes, Nick Mosby, Brandon M. Scott and more.


Baltimore Uprising: Analyzing The Demonstrations, Protests & Violence Following The Death Of Freddie Gray

Baltimore UprisingApril 29, 2015 – Segment 2

Listen to our continuing discussion and analysis of the demonstrations, protests, and violence following of the death of Freddie Gray, with: Hip-Hop artist Kane Mayfield; Doug Colbert, Professor of Law at University of Maryland Carey School of Law; Faraji Muhammad, Host of Listen Up!on WEAA and Youth Empowerment Coordinator for the American Friends Service Committee in Baltimore; Christa Daring, publicist at AK Press and collective member at Red Emma’s Bookstore and Coffeehouse; Michael Scott, Chief Equity Officer, President and Co-Founder of Equity Matters; singer songwriter Navasha Daya, co-Founder / Director of the Healing & Performing Arts at the Youth Resiliency Institute, and Founder of the Daya World, LLC.; Fanon Hill,Executive Director & co-Founder of The Youth Resiliency Institute; and City Paper Managing Editor Baynard Woods.


Special Coverage of Freddie Gray’s Funeral

funeralApril 27, 2015 – Segment 2

Marc serves as anchor for the WEAA team as we go live with special coverage of the funeral of Freddie Gray. With on-site reporting from: Sean Yoes, Host of First Edition on WEAA; Beverly Burke, WEAA’s Morning News Anchor and Host of Morgan State University: A World of Education News; and Farajii Muhammad, Host of Listen Up! on WEAA and Youth Empowerment Coordinator for the American Friends Service Committee in Baltimore. Joining us in studio are Makayla Gilliam-Price, student from Baltimore City College High School and Founder of City Bloc; D Watkins, author, filmmaker, and Professor at Coppin State University; Dominique Stevenson, Program Director for the American Friends Service Committee and co-author with Eddie Conway of Marshall Law: The Life and Times of a Baltimore Black Panther; and Dayvon Love, Director of Research and Public Policy for Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle.

 


Freddie Gray Protests in Baltimore

bmoreprotestsApril 27, 2015 – Segment 1

We look at the protests over the weekend to demand justice for Freddie Gray, with Makayla Gilliam-Price, student from Baltimore City College High School and Founder of City Bloc; D Watkins, author, filmmaker, and Professor at Coppin State University; Ralikh Hayes, member of Baltimore Bloc; Dominique Stevenson, Program Director for the American Friends Service Committee and co-author with Eddie Conway of Marshall Law: The Life and Times of a Baltimore Black Panther; and Dayvon LoveDirector of Research and Public Policy for Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle.

 


Breaking The Silence: A National Town Hall On Women & Girls Of Color

National Conference on Women and Girls of ColorApril 24, 2015 – Segment 2

Listen as we look at an important event coming up this weekend at Morgan State University (MSU): a National Town Hall on Women and Girls of Color. With Dr. Anika Simpson, Associate Professor of Philosophy and Religious Studies and Coordinator of the Women’s and Gender Studies Program at MSU; Dr. Jared Ball, Associate Professor at the School of Global Journalism and Communication at MSU, co-Editor of Malcolm X: A Lie of Reinvention, and author of I Mix What I Like: A Mixtape Manifesto; and Rachel Gilmer, Associate Director for the African American Policy Forum.

Morgan State University and the African American Policy Forum present the National Town Hall on Women and Girls of Color: Saturday, April 25, noon-4pm, Morgan State University Student Theatre, 1700 E. Cold Spring Lane in Baltimore.  Click here to register. 


#FreddieGray: Community Activists On Protests In Baltimore

freddieApril 23, 2015 – Segment 2

We take a look at the Baltimore story that is reverberating across the nation: What happened to Freddie Gray, the 25-year old man who died of a spinal injury on Sunday, a week after being chased and tackled by police officers in Baltimore.

Our panel of guests includes: Dr. Kimberly Moffitt, Associate Professor of American Studies at University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) and co-editor ofBlackberries and Redbones: Critical Articulations of Black Hair/Body Politics in Africana Communities; the Rev. Dr. Heber Brown, Pastor of Pleasant Hope Baptist Church and Executive Director of Orita’s Cross Freedom School; Tawanda Jones, sister of Tyrone West, a man who died while in police custody in July 2013 in Baltimore; Megan Sherman, Producer at The Real News Network; Tim Wilson, co-Director of On Our Shoulders; A. F.  James MacArthur, blogger for the Baltimore Spectator, who spent several months in jail in 2013, following a standoff with the police; and Ray Cook.


Report Back From The International Black Reparations Summit

Reparations SummitApril 22, 2015 – Segment 2

Our guests report back on an important event that took place in New York, April 9-12: Institute of the Black World 21st Century International Black Reparations Summit. The three-day meeting honored pioneers in the fight for reparations for Black Americans.

With: Yvette Modestin, Founder and Director of Encuentro Diaspora Afro in Boston, and Afro Panamanian activist, poet, and writer on issues of the African Diaspora; Dr. Raymond Winbush, Director of the Institute for Urban Research at Morgan State University; and Don Rojas, Director of Communications for the Institute of the Black World 21st Century (IBW) and member of the Board of the Institute of the Black World.

 


Sound Bites: 45th Earth Day – How Far The Environmental Movement Has To Go | Environmental Policy in Maryland

gardeningApril 21, 2015 – Segment 3

Wednesday is the 45th anniversary of Earth Day, and on Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world, our panel reflects upon how far we have come and how far we need to go. With: Sache Jones, Food Justice Consultant for Park Heights Community Health Alliance and Manager of the AFYA Community Teaching Garden in Park Heights; Gerald Winegrad, attorney and Adjunct Professor at the University of Maryland School of Public Policy where he has taught a graduate course on Chesapeake Bay Restoration since 1988; the Rev. Merrick Moise, ordained minister, writer, community activist and teacher, and one of the first African Americans ordained within the Old Catholic Movement in Baltimore; and Patuxent Riverkeeper Fred Tutman.

We close out the hour with a look back at the food, farm and environmental issues covered in the 2015 Maryland State Legislative Session, which came to a close last week. With Bryan Sears, Government Reporter for The Daily Record.  


Local Roundtable: Freddie Gray, Police Violence, and 300 Man March

baltimore-freddie-grayApril 21, 2015 – Segment 2

We host a local news roundtable, where we discuss police violence, this past weekend’s 300 Man March, and Freddie Gray, who died last week while in police custody in Baltimore. With: Bobby Marvin Holmes, Founder of Son of a Dream, a multimedia social development firm committed to empowering youth and families, and co-director and producer of Live Young Blood; John P. Comer, Lead Organizer of Communities United; Tyrone Powers, Professor in the Criminal Justice department at Anne Arundel Community College and former FBI agent; and Sonia Kumar, Staff Attorney at the ACLU of Maryland.


Encore Presentation: Ta-Nehisi Coates’ & The Case For Reparations

Case for ReparationsApril 17, 2015 – Segment 1

We bring you two hours of the Coates family – Ta-Nehisi and Paul Coates, that is. The premium for these two hours when you donate at the $100 level is a copy of Ta-Nehisi Coates’ book The Beautiful Struggle: A Father, Two Sons, and an Unlikely Road to ManhoodPlease call in to 410-319-8888 and help us achieve our goal, or click here to donate online, and please designate The Marc Steiner Show in the drop down menu.

As you know, Ta-Nehisi Coates stepped into the international spotlight last year when his article “The Case for Reparations,” was featured as the cover story for the June 2014 issue of The Atlantic. In the article he puts forth the argument that Black Americans as a group – because of slavery, segregation, and Federal housing policy – have been prevented from building inter-generational wealth.  In the first hour you will hear my interview with him from last June.

 


News Roundup: Police-Involved Killings, Maryland Political Landscape & More

Congressman Elijah CummingsApril 16, 2015 – Segment 2

It’s Thursday morning, and one of my very best friends and colleagues (he even officiated at Valerie and my wedding!) Anthony McCarthy, Host of the Anthony McCarthy Show on WEAA, will be joining me in-house! Once again we have great shows and great premiums when you donate to the WEAA Spring Membership Campaign. In fact, if you are able to donate at the $250 level, you will be invited to a dinner with Anthony and me!

It’s a live news roundtable with Anthony and Catalina Byrd, co-host of No Hooks for the Hip-Hop Chronicles on WEAA, with topics to include the police-involved killings across the U.S.

 


From The Archives: Forbidden Fruit: Love Stories from the Underground Railroad

Betty DeRamusApril 16, 2015 – Segment 1

It’s Thursday morning, and one of my very best friends and colleagues (he even officiated at Valerie and my wedding!) Anthony McCarthy, Host of the Anthony McCarthy Show on WEAA, will be joining me in-house! Once again we have great shows and great premiums when you donate to the WEAA Spring Membership Campaign. In fact, if you are able to donate at the $250 level, you will be invited to a dinner with Anthony and me!

Listen in to my conversation with author Betty DeRamus about her fascinating book Forbidden Fruit: Love Stories from the Underground RailroadFor $100 donation you will want to have this book in your library – I couldn’t put it down!


Encore Presentation: Lawrence Hill’s ‘The Book Of Negroes’

The Book of NegroesApril 15, 2015 – Segment 1

We begin the show with my interview with Lawrence Hill, author of nine books including The Book of Negroes, which has been made into a television miniseries on BET. The Book of Negroes is our premium for this hour when you donate at the $100 level to WEAA 88.9FM at 410-319-8888.


Parenting: Talking To Your Children About Race

blmApril 13, 2015 – Segment 2

This week is the Spring Membership Drive for WEAA, and we have a lineup of great programs and great premiums! Please call into our show this week between 10 AM and noon eastern to make a pledge–410.319.8888, or pledge online here.

Our panel speaks about parenting and talking to children about race. The guests are: Dr. Karsonya “Kaye” Whitehead, Assistant Professor of Communication and Affiliate Assistant Professor of African and African American Studies at Loyola University Maryland and author of Letters to My Black Sons: Raising Boys in a Post-Racial AmericaDr. Roni Ellington, Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at Morgan State University; and Dr. Tara Mundell, mental health specialist, clinical psychologist and author of Let’s Talk About It, a book for children aimed at inspiring young, brilliant minds to build their self-esteem and confidence.


Reparations: A Musical

reparationsApril 9, 2015 – Segment 2

We take a sneak peak of Reparations: A Musical, a unique production that blends drama, comedy, music and dance to make the concept and issue of reparations “relatable.” With: Joseph Edwards, author of Reparations: A Musical; and Shirley Basfield Dunlap, Director of Reparations: A Musical and Associate Professor and Coordinator of Theatre Arts at Morgan State University.


Billie Holiday and the War of Drugs

billieApril 7, 2015 – Segment 1

Today is the 100th anniversary of the birth of Billie Holiday. In honor of her birth, we speak to Johann Hari, author of Chasing the Scream: The First and Last Days of the American Drug War, the centerpiece of which tells the tale of Harry Anslinger, the first head of the Federal Bureau of Narcotics, and his personal war to destroy Billie Holiday. Holiday struggled with heroin addiction but was also emblematic of the fearlessness of standing up against racism. Anslinger was a racist and he hated jazz, so Billie Holiday embodied all that he loathed.


Philosophers’ Roundtable: Race & Class In The United States

protestApril 6, 2015 – Segment 2

We host a discussion about race and class in the U.S. with Dr. Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, Assistant Professor in Princeton University’s Center for African American Studies; and A. Adar Ayira, Project Manager of the More in the Middle Campaign for Associated Black Charities and facilitator and analyst at Baltimore Racial Justice Action, a program of Fusion Partnerships.


Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., The Poor Peoples Campaign & Reparations

KING ASSASSINATIONApril 6, 2015 – Segment 1

April 4th marked the 47th anniversary of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination. To honor him, we listen to a recent show on King’s visions for racial and economic justice.

The Poor People’s Campaign was a testament to Dr. King’s long term vision for civil rights and equality,  beyond integration and voters rights.  He understood that unless there were equal economic opportunities for all Americans, the dream of social mobility and equality  would never truly be realized.

Marc and his panel turn their attention to Dr. King’s economic policies and the Activities of the Poor People’s Campaign.  Our guests for this segment: Adar Ayira, Project Manager of the More in the Middle Campaign for Associated Black Charities and facilitator and analyst at Baltimore Racial Justice Action, a program of Fusion Partnerships; Robert Birt, author of The Liberatory Thought of Martin Luther King Jr.: Critical Essays on the Philosopher King, and Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Bowie State University; and Jeff Singer, Founder and former Executive Director of Health Care for the Homeless.


Black and Jewish: What It Means To Be Both

twittypraysApril 3, 2015 – Segment 2

We delve into the world of Black Jewish traditions and discover what it means to be both Black and Jewish as Marc speaks with author, blogger and public speaker MaNishtanahip hop artist, Orthodox Jew and Baltimore native Yitz Jordan aka Y-LoveMichael Twitty, Culinary Historian of African and African American Foodways and blogger at Afroculinaria. Michael Twitty discussed his recent harassment at Israel’s Ben-Gurion Airport in Haaretz.


Lawrence Hill on The Book of Negroes

Lawrence_HillApril 1, 2015 – Segment 4

Marc speaks with author Lawrence Hill, who has written nine books including the acclaimed The Book of Negroes, which was made into a television miniseries on BET.


The SNCC Organizing Model

SNCCMarch 30, 2015 – Segment 2

We look back at the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, or SNCC, and reflect upon that organization’s organizing model and how it translates to community organizing efforts today. With: Betty Robinson, former member of SNCC, co-Editor of Hands on the Freedom Plow: Personal Accounts of Women in SNCC, 2003 Open Society Institute Community Fellow, and former lead organizer for the Citizens Planning and Housing Association (CPHA); and Judy Richardson, former member of SNCC, filmmaker who worked on Eyes on the Prize, co-Editor of Hands on the Freedom Plow: Personal Accounts by Women in SNCC, and Board Member of the SNCC Legacy Committee.

 


Gentrification: “Against the New Baltimore”

eastsideMarch 30, 2015 – Segment 1

Dr. Lawrence Brown sits in as guest host for Marc Steiner.

We revisit the topic of gentrification in Baltimore, springing from D. Watkins’ recent piece for salon.com: “Black history bulldozed for another Starbucks: Against the new Baltimore.” With: D. Watkins, author, filmmaker and professor at Coppin State University; Dr. Tonya Sanders, Assistant Professor, Graduate City and Regional Planning program, Graduate Department of Built Environment Studies, School of Architecture + Planning at Morgan State University; Dr. Marisela Gomez, physician, community activist and author of Race, Class, Power, and Organizing in East Baltimore: Rebuilding Abandoned Communities in America; Donald Gresham, East Baltimore resident and founder of the Baltimore Redevelopment Action Coalition for Empowerment.

 


Dr. Charles Johnson: Taming the Ox: Buddhist Stories and Reflections on Politics, Race, Culture, and Spiritual Practice

Dr. Charles JohnsonMarch 27, 2015 – Segment 1

Prepare to be inspired as Marc talks with National Book Award-winning novelist and scholar Dr. Charles Johnson about his newest book Taming the Ox: Buddhist Stories and Reflections on Politics, Race, Culture, and Spiritual Practice.


Black Women in Academia

Audre-LordeMarch 26, 2015 – Segment 5

We close out the show with a discussion of Black Women in Academia. Our guests are: Dr. Bonnie Thornton Dill, Dean of Arts and Humanities at the University of Maryland, College Park; Dr. Pamela Scott Johnson, Interim Dean of the College of Liberal Arts at Morgan State University; and Dr. Tara Bynum, Assistant Professor in the Department of English at Towson University.


An Indigenous People’s History of the United States

roxanneMarch 25, 2015 – Segment 1

Marc speaks with Native American author, historian, feminist, and self-described revolutionary Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz on her fascinating and informative book An Indigenous People’s History of the United States.


Transforming Criminal Justice Policy

rollcallMarch 23, 2015 – Segment 2

Our panel of guests discusses ways to transform criminal justice policy in Baltimore and Maryland. With: the Rev. Dr. Heber Brown, community activist, pastor of Pleasant Hope Baptist Church and Executive Director of Orita’s Cross Freedom School; David Rocah, Senior Staff Attorney for ACLU of Maryland; and Marc Schindler, Executive Director of the Justice Policy Institute.


Baltimore’s Race Problems: Part 2

fergMarch 18, 2015 – Segment 2

We continue our discussion on the topic of race and racism in Baltimore, focusing on practical solutions. Our panel of guests includes: Dr. Roni Ellington, Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at Morgan State University; Roberto Alejandro, reporter for Baltimore’s Afro-American newspaper; Dr. Lawrence Brown, public health consultant and Assistant Professor of Public Health in the School of Community Health and Policy at Morgan State University; Michael Scott, Chief Equity Officer/President/Co-Founder of Equity Matters; and Dr. Tara Bynum, Assistant Professor in the Department of English at Towson University.


Baltimore’s Race Problems: Part 1

battsMarch 17, 2015 – Segment 2

Do you think Baltimore has a race problem? An article in the Baltimore Sun this past weekend indicates that Baltimore leaders agree: City has a race problemWe discuss it with: Dr. Lawrence Brown, public health consultant and Assistant Professor of Public Health in the School of Community Health and Policy at Morgan State University; community activist Kim Trueheart; Michael Eugene Johnson, Executive Director of the Paul Robeson Institute for Social Change; and Roberto Alejandro, reporter for Baltimore’s Afro-American newspaper.


Philosophers’ Roundtable: Race & Class In The United States

protestMarch 12, 2015 – Segment 4

We host a discussion and debate about race and class in the U.S. with Dr. Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, Assistant Professor in Princeton University’s Center for African American Studies; and A. Adar Ayira, Project Manager of the More in the Middle Campaign for Associated Black Charities and facilitator and analyst at Baltimore Racial Justice Action, a program of Fusion Partnerships.


Being A Black Woman In Academia

Dr. Bonnie Thornton DillMarch 6, 2015 – Segment 4

We close out the show with a discussion of Black Women in Academia. Our guests will be: Dr. Bonnie Thornton Dill, Dean of Arts and Humanities at the University of Maryland, College Park; Dr. Pamela Scott Johnson, Interim Dean of the College of Liberal Arts at Morgan State University; and Dr. Tara Bynum, Assistant Professor in the Department of English at Towson University.


Reactions to Justice Department Report On Ferguson Police Department

Ferguson, MOMarch 6, 2015 – Segment 3

Our guests reflect upon the report issued this week by the U.S. Department of Justice on the Ferguson Police Department, with: Akiba Solomon, Colorlines Editorial Director; and Dr. Tara Bynum, Assistant Professor in the Department of English at Towson University.


50th Anniversary Of Selma March: Remembering Our History & Voting Rights Today

Selma 1965March 6, 2015 – Segment 2

This month marks the 50th anniversary of the Selma march, and we take time to reflect upon the events of March 1965. Our first guest will be Cornell William Brooks, President and CEO of the NAACP.

Then at 10:20 we consider the history of the Selma march in relationship to the current state of voting rights. With: Andrew Aydin, Digital Director and Policy Advisor to Congressman John Lewis and co-author with Lewis of the New York Times best-selling graphic memoir trilogy, March (illustrated by Nate Powell); Dr. Barbara Harris Combs, Assistant Professor of Sociology and Southern Studies at University of Mississippi’s Center for the Study of Southern Culture and author of From Selma to Montgomery: The Long March to Freedom; A.Adar Ayira, Project Manager of the More in the Middle Campaign for Associated Black Charities and facilitator and analyst at Baltimore Racial Justice Action, a program of Fusion Partnerships; and journalist Brentin Mock, who writes regularly for Grist about environmental justice issues.


Visualizing America’s Uncomfortable History: Paul Rucker’s ‘Rewind’ At Creative Alliance

Paul Rucker - RewindMarch 5, 2015 – Segment 2

We take an audio tour of Rewind, a fascinating exhibit currently showing at Baltimore’s Creative Alliance, featuring the work of artist, composer and musician Paul Rucker.  Rucker is artist-in-residence at both the Creative Alliance and Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA).  Rewind is the largest collection of Rucker’s work to date, and visually embodies America’s uncomfortable history regarding issues of social justice through sculptural installations, text, quilts, and animations.


Masculinities — Intersections: Sexuality, Gender, Race, and Ethnicity

masculinitiesMarch 4, 2015 – Segment 4

We offer a preview of Morgan State University’s (MSU) academic symposium “Intersections: Sexuality, Gender, Race, and Ethnicity,” which is taking place from 9am to 4pm on Saturday, March 7th, in Morgan’s Student Center. The theme of this year’s symposium is “Masculinities.”

Joining us to discuss the event are: Kylar Broadus, Rockwood Leadership Fellow, Founder of Trans People of Color Coalition, Senior Public Policy Counsel and Leader of the Transgender Civil Rights Project At Task Force;  Dr. Mark Anthony Neal, Professor of African & African American Studies at Duke University, host of Left of Black, and author of the book Leroy: Illegible Black MasculinitiesBakari Jones, Founder and Executive Director of Bois of Baltimore; and Dr. Anika Simpson, Associate Professor of Philosophy and Religious Studies and Coordinator of the Women’s and Gender Studies Program at MSU.


Local Action Against Wrongful Arrests of Young People

babybookingMarch 4, 2015 – Segment 3

We are joined by Charnell D. Cobb-El, Site Director of The Baltimore Algebra Project at Patterson High School and Executive Director and Founder of Convert Consulting, who tells us about an action on Thursday, March 5th on the wrongful arrests by Baltimore City Police against young people of color as well as the school funding crisis.


Sound Bites: Radical Farmers Use Fresh Food to Fight Racial Injustice | Debating The Maryland Farmers’ Rights Act | Tribute To Juanita Ewell Of Cherry Hill Urban Garden

Juanita Ewell, Cherry Hill Urban GardenMarch 3, 2015 – Segment 3

On Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world, we begin the hour with a story from Yes! Magazine: Radical Farmers Use Fresh Food to Fight Racial Injustice and the New Jim Crow. With: Jalal Sabur, farmer and prison abolitionist, who helped to start the Freedom Food Alliance, a collective of farmers, political prisoners, and organizers in upstate New York committed to incorporating food justice to address racism in the criminal justice system; and Leah Penniman, farmer and educator based in the Albany, NY, area who wrote the article for YES!.

Then, our guests debate proposed legislation before the Maryland General Assembly, the Farmers’ Rights Act. With: Delegate Charles Otto (Republican, District 38A, Somerset & Worcester Counties), Deputy Minority Whip in the Maryland State House, and member of the House Environment and Transportation Committee and the House Natural Resources, Agriculture & Open Space Subcommittee; and Senator Richard Madaleno, Jr. (Democrat, District 18, Montgomery County), Vice-Chair of the Senate Budget and Taxation Committee, Chair of the Senate Health and Human Services Subcommittee, and primary sponsor of Senate Bill 0532, or the Farmers’ Rights Act.

We close out the show with a tribute to a local hero, Cherry Hill Urban Garden’s Juanita Ewell, who passed away on February 17th. From the Garden’s Facebook Page:

Juanita started the garden in 2010 with the mission of saving the community. She worked tirelessly to spread her love of gardening and healthy eating, and her energy and passion touched the hearts of so many. She will be dearly missed by her family, friends, and the entire Cherry Hill community.”

We remember this amazing person, an agent for change in her community, by listening back to an excerpt from our interview with her from last summer.


Bring Your Voice To Annapolis: Lobby Days To Reform Police, Discuss Housing And Jobs

Leaders of a Beautiful StruggleFebruary 25, 2015 – Segment 4

We take a look at a number of opportunities to engage in civic involvement here in Maryland, with Dayvon Love, Director of Research and Public Policy for Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle and Caryn Aslan, Policy Associate at the Job Opportunities Task Force. First we will hear about the opportunity to attend Annapolis hearings on reforming the Law Enforcement Officers Bill of Rights,Thursday, February 26th at 1pm and Thursday, March 12th at 1pm.

Also on Thursday, February 26, beginning at 9:30am, you can attend Lobby Day in Annapolis: Housing & Jobs. This annual lobby day, which will include a rally, march and opportunities to meet with legislators, is organized by Jobs Opportunity Task Force (JOTF), Healthcare for the Homeless, and Out for Justice.


Neighborhood Revitalization & Gentrification In Baltimore: Creating The City We Want

Gentrification in BaltimoreFebruary 25, 2015 – Segment 3

We talk about Neighborhood Revitalization and Gentrification in Baltimore, and how we can create the city we want.

With: Jeff Singer, Founder and former Executive Director of Health Care for the Homeless; Ben Stone, Executive Director of Station North Arts and Entertainment, Inc.; Lena Leone, President of the New Greenmount West Association; John Duda, worker owner at Red Emma’s, Communications Coordinator for the Democracy Collaborative and a founding board member of Baltimore Activating Solidarity Economies; and Mia Loving, Curator and Founder of Invisible Majority, a creative community incubator.


Talking About Race With Bryan Stevenson Of The Equal Justice Initiative

Bryan StevensonFebruary 25, 2015 – Segment 2

We preview of the newest lecture in Open Society Institute-Baltimore’s Talking About Race series, taking place Thursday night. I will talk with Bryan Stevenson, Executive Director of Equal Justice Initiative, a law practice dedicated to defending some of America’s most rejected and marginalized people, about his new book Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption. The book details one of the first cases Stevenson took on, that of Walter McMillan, a Black man who was sentenced to die for a notorious murder he insisted he didn’t commit.

Bryan Stevenson will give his talk Thursday night, February 26th at 7pm in the Wheeler Auditorium at the Enoch Pratt Free Library in Baltimore. This event is open to the public and is part of OSI-Baltimore’s Talking About Race Series, co-sponsored by the Enoch Pratt Free Library. 

Roland Park: One Of America’s First Garden Suburbs, And Built For Whites Only

Roland Park in BaltimoreFebruary 19, 2015 – Segment 3

Dr. Lawrence Brown, activist, public health consultant, and Assistant Professor of Public Health in the School of Community Health and Policy at Morgan State University, sits in for Marc.

We look at a piece of Baltimore’s history as a segregated city as we examine the Roland Park neighborhood. Our guest is Elizabeth Evitts Dickinson, who wrote an article in the Fall 2014 issue of Johns Hopkins Magazine, Roland Park: one of America’s first garden suburbs, and built for whites only. Dickinson has written about architecture, design, and urbanism for national publications for nearly 20 years. Her articles and essays have been published in The New York TimesThe New York Times Magazine, and The Atlantic Magazine’s CityLab, among manyothers. She is a contributing editor with Architect magazine, teaches writing at the Maryland Institute College of Art, and was the former editor of Urbanite magazine in Baltimore.


Remembering Audre Lorde On Her Birthday

audreFebruary 18, 2015 – Segment 2

We celebrate the birthday of Audre Lorde, who described herself as a “Black lesbian mother warrior poet.” Producer Mark Gunnery spoke to local artists, activists, poets, academics and performers about her life and impact, and asked them to share some of their favorite writings of hers. With: the Rev. Merrick Moise, writer, community activist and teacher, and one of the first African Americans ordained within the Old Catholic Movement in Baltimore; Kalima Young, Instructor at the University of Maryland College Park and Towson University and Director of the Baltimore Art + Justice Project, a project of the Office of Community Engagement at the Maryland Institute College of Art; Abdu Ali, musician, DJ, and arts and culture events curator; Dr. Karsonya “Kaye” Wise Whitehead, Assistant Professor of Communication and Affiliate Assistant Professor of African and African American Studies at Loyola University Maryland, and the author of several books, including the recently released Letters to My Black Sons: Raising Boys in a Post-Racial America, and the award-winning Notes From A Colored Girl: The Civil War Pocket Diaries of Emile Frances Davis; and Michelle Antoinette Nelson aka LOVE the Poet, indie spoken word artist and musician, and author of the book Black Marks on White Paper.

 


Creating Brave Spaces: UMBC’s Critical Social Justice Intensive

UMBC Critical Social Justice WeekFebruary 17, 2015 – Segment 2

Marc Steiner Show Producer Stefanie Mavronis talks to University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) Women’s Center Director Jess Myers, Women’s Center Coordinator Megan Tagle Adams, UMBC student organizer Amelia Meman, and Assistant Director of Student Life, Cultural and Spiritual Diversity Lisa Gray about UMBC Critical Social Justice Week, a week-long series of events focused on learning social justice, teaching social justice and “Creating Brave Spaces,” this year’s theme.

The Women’s Center with Student Life’s Mosaic Center presents the Critical Social Justice 2015 Keynote Lecture with comedian and blogger Franchesca “Chescaleigh” Ramsey. She’ll be discussing “Your Powerful Online Voice: Social Media for Social Change” this Wednesday night, February 18th, at 7pm in the UMBC University Center Ballroom, 1000 Hilltop Circle in Catonsville. This event is open to the public.

More information about the keynote and the other great programming happening at UMBC during Critical Social Justice week at critsocjustice.wordpress.com  and at womenscenter.umbc.edu 


Islamophobia in the US In The Wake Of Fatal North Carolina Shooting

ncFebruary 12, 2015 – Segment 2

In light of Tuesday’s fatal shootings of three young Muslims near the University of North Carolina, we examine Islamophobia in America, with: Imam Earl El-Amin of the Muslim Community Cultural Center of Baltimore;  Zainab Chaudry, CAIR Maryland Outreach Manager for the Council on American-Islamic Relations; and theRev. Dr. Heber Brown, community activist, pastor of Pleasant Hope Baptist Church and Executive Director of Orita’s Cross Freedom School.

 


Freedom’s Diaries: Diaries Of Free African Americans Throughout The Antebellum & Civil War

Freedoms DiariesFebruary 6, 2015 – Segment 3

We hear a preview of an event this weekend at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of African American History and Culture, Freedom’s Diaries. The event showcases two diaries of Black individuals from the Antebellum and Civil War period.

With: Dr. Karsonya “Kaye” Whitehead, Assistant Professor of Communication and Affiliate Assistant Professor of African and African American Studies at Loyola University Maryland, author of Notes From a Colored Girl: The Civil War Pocket Diaries of Emile Frances Davis and My Black Sons: Raising Boys in a Post-Racial America, which just came out last week; and Dr. Myra Young Armstead, Professor of History and Director of Africana Studies at Bard College and author of a number of books including Freedom’s Gardener: James F. Brown, Horticulture, and the Hudson Valley in Antebellum America.


Art-Part’heid: Bridging the Gap of Disparities in the Baltimore Art Scene

Station North Arts and Entertainment DistrictJanuary 29, 2015 – Segment 4

We discuss an important event this Sunday at the 2640 Space: Art-Part’heid: Bridging the Gap of Disparities in the Baltimore Art Scene, a panel discussion and community dialogue on race, power, privilege, exclusion and shared wealth.

With: Mia Loving Curator and Founder of Invisible Majority, a creative community incubator; Michelle Gomez, independent curator who works collaboratively with under-represented audiences on community-focused exhibitions in Baltimore; Sophia Mak, artist, dancer, performer, educator, activist, and Program Manager at 901 Arts, a youth community arts organization; and Abdu Ali, musician and writer.


Do Baltimore Teens Face Worse Conditions Than Their Nigerian Counterparts?

Youth-JailJanuary 27, 2015 – Segment 2

Do poor teens in Baltimore face worse conditions than their counterparts in Nigeria, as a recent study suggests? We look at the study, published in December’s Journal of Adolescent Health, with: Dr. Kristin Mmari, Assistant Professor in the Department of Population, Family and Reproductive Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health; Dr. Lawrence Brown, public health consultant and Assistant Professor of Public Health in the School of Community Health and Policy at Morgan State University; and Dr. Roni Ellington, Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at Morgan State University.


×

Listen to The Marc Steiner Show • M-F 10am-Noon LISTEN LIVE