The Marc Steiner Show

Racism

Apache Sacred Land To Be Used For Copper Mining

tontoDecember 17, 2014 – Segment 3

We look at Apache Sacred Land in the Tonto National Forest in Arizona being ceded to copper mining interests. Our guests are: Mark Trahant, independent print and media journalist; Mike McAuliff, Senior Congressional Correspondent for the Huffington PostTerry Rambler, Chairman of the San Carlos Apache Tribe; and Gyasi Ross, member of the Blackfeet Tribe, father, entrepreneur, attorney and author of How to Say I Love You in Indian.

 


Beyond Ferguson: Moving Towards Societal Change & Talking To Kids About Race

african-american-kidsDecember 17, 2014 – Segment 2

We host a special discussion on lessons from Ferguson and practical advice for parents on how to talk with their children about race and societal change.

With: the Rev. Dr. Heber Brown, community activist, pastor of Pleasant Hope Baptist Church and Executive Director of Orisha’s Cross Freedom School; Dr. Kimberly Moffitt, Associate Professor of American Studies at University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) and co-editor of Blackberries and Redbones: Critical Articulations of Black Hair/Body Politics in Africana Communities; and Dr. Karsonya “Kaye” Whitehead, Assistant Professor of Communication and Affiliate Assistant Professor of African and African American Studies at Loyola University Maryland, and author of Notes from a Colored Girl: The Civil War Pocket Diaries of Emile Frances Davis and the forthcoming Letters to My Black Sons: Raising Boys in a Post-Racial America.

 


From The Archives: Dr. Eric Foner On Abraham Lincoln & Slavery

Abraham LincolnDecember 12, 2014 – Segment 3

We listen back to our interview with esteemed historian Dr. Eric Foner, DeWitt Clinton Professor of History at Columbia University, who talks about his 2011 Pulitzer Prize-winning book The Fiery Trial: Abraham Lincoln and American Slavery.


Ferguson, Staten Island & Baltimore: How Housing Apartheid Created The Basis For Police Brutality

Housing SegregationDecember 10, 2014 – Segment 2

Listen to analysis and discussion on how the history of housing apartheid created the basis for deep-seated racism and police brutality. Our guests will examine the current social and political landscapes of Ferguson, Staten Island, and Baltimore, and reflect upon how events in our history created a foundation for where we are today.

With: Dr. Lawrence Brown, activist, public health consultant, and Assistant Professor of Public Health in the School of Community Health and Policy at Morgan State University; Dr. Colin Gordon, Professor of History and Director of Undergraduate Studies at the University of Iowa, senior research consultant at the Iowa Policy Project, and author of Mapping Decline: St. Louis and the Fate of the American City and Growing Apart: A Political History of American Inequality.


Sound Bites: Where’s The Diversity in the Environmental Movement? | Diverse Legal Concerns for MD Agriculture

protestincineratorDecember 9, 2014 – Segment 4

It’s a brand new episode of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our future. The first segment springs from an article written for The Bay Journal by Whitney Pipkin: “The ‘green ceiling': Environmental organizations lack diversity.” Pipkin’s article examines”The State of Diversity in Environmental Organizations,” a report issued by the Green 2.0 working group.

Our panel of guests includes: Whitney Pipkin, writer on food, agriculture and the environment for The Bay Journal, Fellow of the Institute for Journalists of Natural resources and blogger at thinkabouteat.com; Fred Tutman, Patuxent Riverkeeper; Dr. Dorceta Taylor,  Professor, Environmental Justice Field of Studies Coordinator, Past Chair of the Environment and Technology Section of the American Sociological Association at the University of Michigan, and author of the report we are discussing and also Toxic Communities:  Environmental Racism, Industrial Pollution, and Residential Mobility; and Jacqueline Patterson, Director of the NAACP Climate Justice Initiative.

We close out the show with a look at a recent report on top legal concerns for Maryland’s agricultural community. We will talk with the report’s co-authors: Paul Goeringer, Extension Legal Specialist in the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources at the University of Maryland; and Dr. Stephan Tubene, Co-Project Director, Outreach for Socially Disadvantaged Farmers and Ranchers Project.

 


Police Violence & The Legal System’s Failure To Respond To Ferguson, NY & Cleveland

protestDecember 8, 2014 – Segment 2

We host a panel discussion on race and racism in the U.S., specifically looking at police violence and the legal system’s failure to respond to civilian killings in Ferguson, New York and Cleveland with: A. Adar Ayira, Project Manager of the More in the Middle Campaign for Associated Black Charities and facilitator and analyst at Baltimore Racial Justice Action, a program of Fusion Partnerships; and Doug Colbert, Professor of Law at the University of Maryland Carey Law School.


NY Grand Jury Decides ‘No Indictment’ For Officer In Chokehold Death Of Eric Garner

garnerDecember 4, 2014 – Segment 2

We take a look at the decision handed down this afternoon by the grand jury in New York, not to indict Officer Daniel Pantaleo in the chokehold death last July of Eric Garner, an unarmed 43-year old man who was suspected of illegally selling single cigarettes.

Our panel of guests includes: Rinku Sen, President of Race Forward and Publisher of Colorlines; Rev. Dr. Heber Brown, community activist and Pastor of Pleasant Hope Baptist Church; and Dr. Karsonya “Kaye” Whitehead, Assistant Professor of Communication and Affiliate Assistant Professor of African and African American Studies at Loyola University Maryland.


National News Roundup: Ferguson, Attorney General Holder Targets Racial Profiling & Bill Cosby Resigns From Temple

Eric HolderDecember 3, 2014 – Segment 3

We host a National News Roundup. Our panel will discuss Attorney General Eric Holder’s announcement of a plan to target racial profiling; Bill Cosby’s resignation from the Temple University Board; and the contingent of St. Louis-area police union members who are providing security to former officer Darren Wilson.

Our guests are: Dr. Tara Bynum, Assistant Professor in the Department of English at Towson University; Dr. Jared Ball, Associate Professor at Morgan State University’s School of Global Journalism and Communication, co-Editor of Malcolm X: A Lie of Reinvention and author of I Mix What I Like: A Mixtape Manifesto; and Tyrone Keys, author, public affairs strategist and public relations expert.


Reflecting Upon Racist “Watermelon” Remarks At The National Book Awards

Jacqueline WoodsonNovember 26, 2014 – Segment 3

We reflect upon last week’s National Book Award ceremonies, where Daniel Handler, author of the Lemony Snicket books, made the following racist remarks when introducing Jackie Woodson, who won the award for Young People’s Literature for her book Brown Girl:

I told you! I told Jackie she was going to win. And I said that if she won, I would tell all of you something I learned this summer, which is that Jackie Woodson is allergic to watermelon. Just let that sink in your mind.

And I said you have to put that in a book. And she said, “you put that in a book.” And I said “I am only writing a book about a black girl who is allergic to watermelon if I get a blurb from you, Cornell West, Toni Morrison, and Barack Obama saying, ‘This guy’s okay. This guy’s fine.'”

We hear from: Dr. Charles Johnson, National Book Award-winning novelist and scholar whose most recent book is called Taming the Ox; Tonya Bolden, award-winning author of over 20 books for young readers and adults, whose newest book is Searching for Sarah Rector: The Richest Black Girl in America; and Dr. George Yancy, Professor of Philosophy at Duquesne University who recently edited a book entitled White Self-Criticality beyond Anti-Racism: How Does It Feel to Be a White Problem?

 


Native American Perspectives On Ferguson Decision & Thanksgiving

Gyasi RossNovember 26, 2014 – Segment 2

As we look to the Thanksgiving Holiday, we host a Native American Roundtable. Our guests share their perspectives on Thanksgiving and also reflect on the Ferguson Grand Jury decision. With: author, historian, feminist, and self-described revolutionary Dr. Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, author of An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States; writer, entrepreneur, and attorney Gyasi Ross, member of the Blackfeet Tribe, whose newest book is How To Say I Love You In Indian; Ashley Minner, community artist, member of the Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina, and Founder of the Native American After School Art Program.

 


What The Ferguson Grand Jury Decision Says

Rioting erupts in Ferguson, Missouri after police involved shooting of an unarmed teenNovember 25, 2014 – Segment 2

We will look at the decision of the Grand Jury in St. Louis, MO, that decided not to indict Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson, who fatally shot unarmed teenager Michael Brown in August, with: Missouri State Senator Maria Chappelle-Nadal (St. Louis County – District 14), who has been attending the protests in Ferguson since the beginning; Dr. Lawrence Brown, public health consultant and Assistant Professor of Public Health in the School of Community Health and Policy at Morgan State University; Mothyna James-Brightful, Visionary Director for Heal A Woman To Heal A Nation and Cameron Miles, Director of Mentoring Male Teens in the Hood.

 


Baltimore Town Hall: Should The Community Control The Police?

Real News Town HallNovember 21, 2014 – Two Hour Special

Listen to a special 2-hour broadcast of excerpts from a town hall meeting I moderated Wednesday night at the Real News Network, on the role of the community in the Police Department. The panel and the audience – including representatives from the Baltimore Police Department, public officials, activists and community members – debated and discussed the issues and possible solutions.

Included in the discussion were: the ACLU’s Sonia Kumar; community activist Kim Trueheart; Adam Jackson of Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle; Chief of the Baltimore Police Department’s Community Partnership Division Lt. Col. Melvin Russell; criminal defense attorney J. Wyndal Gordon; former Black Panther Marshall “Eddie” Conway; Baltimore County Police Department Lt. Jeffrey Shorter; Alok Mukherjee of the Toronto Police Services Board; and Dr. Ray Winbush of the Institute for Urban Research at Morgan State University.

Click here to see a transcript of the town hall and the full-length video of the event.

 


Ferguson Update: Still No Grand Jury Decision

FergusonNovember 19, 2014 – Segment 2

We get an update on the current political climate in Ferguson, Missouri, with Missouri State Senator Maria Chappelle-Nadal, St. Louis County-District 14, who has been out at the protests since they began.

 


Minister Farrakhan Visits Morgan

louis-farrakhanNovember 18, 2014 – Segment 2

Minister Carlos Muhammad, Nation of Islam historian-archivist, Student Minister for Muhammad Mosque Number 6 in Baltimore, and Baltimore representative for The Honorable Minister Louis Farrakhan joins us to talk about Farrakhan’s visit to Morgan State University on Saturday, November 22nd as the keynote speaker for the BUSI (Black United Summit International) Conference.


Awaiting the Ferguson Grand Jury Decision: What Are The Implications of the Possible Outcomes?

Ferguson ProtestNovember 17, 2014 – Segment 2

The country is braced for the Grand Jury decision in Ferguson, Missouri, regarding whether to indict a police officer who shot and killed unarmed teenager Michael Brown on August 9. We examine the possible outcomes in this case and their implications.

Our panel of guests includes: Edward Wyckoff Williams, Contributing Editor at The Root and Political Contributor and Special Correspondent withAlJazeera America; Megan Sherman, producer at the Real News Network; and Dr. Lawrence Brown, activist, public health consultant, and Assistant Professor of Public Health in the School of Community Health and Policy at Morgan State University

 


Sexual Assault, Reporting and African Americans

Robert-JenningsNovember 12, 2014 – Segment 3

We discuss a controversial speech by Robert Jennings, the president of Lincoln University. Speaking to students, he said women should not report rape in order to keep Black men out of prison.
We’re joined by Dr. Kimberly Moffitt, Associate Professor of American Studies at University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) and co-editor of Blackberries and Redbones: Critical Articulations of Black Hair/Body Politics in Africana Communities; Dr. Eric Pritchard, Assistant Professor of English at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and Lincoln University alumna; Adam Jackson, CEO of Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle; and Stephanie Keene, Lincoln University alumna, intimate partner violence specialist and Lincoln University Alumna.

Voices From The Archives: Pulitzer Prize-Winning Author Taylor Branch

Taylor Branch

November 7, 2014 – Segment 5

Listen to a special “Voices of the Archives” interview from The Marc Steiner Show, with noted writers of our time.

I talk with Taylor Branch, Pulitzer Prize-winning author and historian whose trilogy America in the King Years chronicles the life of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and the Civil Rights Movement.

 


The Whiteness Project: Exploring How White Americans Experience Their Ethnicity

The Whiteness ProjectOctober 30, 2014 – Segment 3

We take a look at The Whiteness Project, an interactive investigation into how Americans who identify themselves as “white” experience their ethnicity.

We talk with Whitney Dow, Founder of Two Tone Productions and Director/Producer ofThe Whiteness ProjectMarco Williams, Associate Arts Professor at the Kanbar Institute of Film & Television, Tisch School of the Arts, New York University; A. Adar Ayira, project manager of the More in the Middle Campaign for Associated Black Charities and facilitator and analyst at Baltimore Racial Justice Action, a program of Fusion Partnerships; and Sarah Tooley, member of Baltimore Racial Justice Action.


Michelle Alexander On Mass Incarceration and African Americans

Michelle AlexanderOctober 23, 2014 – Segment 5

We close out the show with a special archive edition of The Marc Steiner Show, our conversation with civil rights litigator and legal scholar Michelle Alexander about mass incarceration and African Americans. Alexander is the author of the highly-acclaimed book The New Jim Crow.

LINK

 


From Ferguson to Gaza: Black & Palestinian Communities and Activism

palestine gazaOctober 23, 2014 – Segment 3

We discuss the growing synergy between African American and Palestinian activists in the U.S., and discuss the points of unity and tension within Black and Arab communities. We are joined by academic, author, and activist Dr. Steven Salaita; and the Rev. Dr. Heber Brown, community activist, Pastor of Pleasant Hope Baptist Church, and Executive Director of Orisha’s Cross Freedom School.

LINK

 


Ebola Update: What We Know, The Politics and Treatment

ebolaOctober 21, 2014 – Segment 2

We continue our conversation on Ebola, and talk about health and political issues surrounding Ebola, treatment, public health implications, and Ebola in the United States. We’re joined by Dr. Lawrence Brown, activist, public health consultant, and Assistant Professor of Public Health in the School of Community Health and Policy at Morgan State University; Dr. Benjamin Hale, writer forSlate, Associate Professor of Philosophy and Environmental Studies at the University of Colorado-Boulder, Vice President of the International Society of Environmental Ethics and co-Editor of the journal Ethics, Policy & Environment; and Emira Woods, Director of Social Impact at Thoughtworks, a software consulting firm dedicated to economic and social justice, and Associate Fellow at the Institute for Policy Studies.

LINK


Racial Divides in Baltimore’s Art World

siloOctober 20, 2014 – Segment 3

We host a panel on the racial divides in the artistic world in Baltimore, inspired by articles in last week’s Baltimore City Paper‘s 2014 Fall Arts Guide. With: Kalima Young, Director of the Baltimore Art + Justice Project, a project of the Office of Community Engagement at MICA; Baynard Woods, Senior Editor for the Baltimore City Paper; Deana Haggag, Director of The Contemporary Museum in Baltimore; and Mia Loving, community organizer, entrepreneur, mother and wife.

LINK

 


Update on Ferguson from Young Journalists and Activists

ferguson

October 20, 2014 – Segment 2

We get an update on events in Ferguson, Missouri, with a number of young journalists and activists who recently returned from that troubled city: freelance reporter Michelle Zei; Muna Mire, intern for The Nation; Ralikh Hayes, executive assistant for the Real News Network and and Board President of the Baltimore Algebra Project; and Megan Sherman, producer at the Real News Network.   

 

LINK


Notes from a Colored Girl: The Civil War Pocket Diaries of Emilie Frances Davis

whitehead_coverOctober 17, 2014 – Segment 2

Dr. Karsonya “Kaye” Whitehead, Assistant Professor of Communication and Affiliate Assistant Professor of African and African American Studies at Loyola University Maryland, talks about her book Notes from a Colored Girl: The Civil War Pocket Diaries of Emilie Frances Davis, which recently received the Letitia Woods Brown Book Award for the Best Edited Book in African American History from the Association of Black Women Historians.

LINK


Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz: An Indigenous People’s History of the United States

Roxanne Dunbar-OrtizOctober 17, 2014 – Segment 1

Listen to Marc’s interview with Native American author, historian, feminist, and self-described revolutionary Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz on her fascinating and informative book An Indigenous People’s History of the United States.

LINK


Remembering Steve Biko: His Life, His Legacy & South Africa Today

Steve BikoOctober 15, 2014 – Segment 1

It’s WEAA’s fund drive, and we have a week’s worth of interesting shows and premiums for you! Please call in to 410-319-8888 from 10-noon and help us meet our goal! You can also pledge online at: http://www.weaa.org/contribute-now/

Listen in to our show commemorating Steve Biko, who was murdered in 1977 while in custody of the South African police. Biko was an anti-apartheid activist in the 1960s and 70s and founder of the Black Consciousness Movement. We reflect upon his life, his legacy, Black Consciousness, and South Africa today, with: Dr. Rozena Maart, Director of the Centre for Critical Research on Race and Identity at the University of Kwa Zulu Natal; and Dr. Xolela Mangcu, Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Cape Town, Oppenheimer Fellow at the Hutchins Center at Harvard University, and author of Biko: A Life, the first full-length biography of Steve Biko; and Adrian Louw, Programme Integrator for Africa’s oldest community radio station project, Bush Radio 89.5FM, who served as the Media Liaison for the Parliament of the Republic of South Africa from 1999 to 2001.

This segment originally aired September 12, 2014.

LINK


Black Nationalism Today

black nationalismOctober 10, 2014 – Segment 2

We turn to a conversation about Black nationalism and its role in the political and cultural landscape today. Our guests include: Dr. Lester Spence, Center for Emerging Media Scholar-In-Residence and Associate Professor of Political Science and Africana Studies at Johns Hopkins University; author and songwriter John Wesley; and Dr. Jeff Menzise, licensed school psychologist in Washington, DC, and author of Dumbin’ Down: Reflections on the Mis-Education of the Negro.

 

LINK


Raising and Educating Black Boys

Classrooms and educationOctober 8, 2014 – Segment 2

Listen to our discussion about the complexities, challenges, and joys of raising and educating boys. With: Jack Pannell, founder of Baltimore Collegiate School for Boys, a Baltimore City Public Charter School scheduled to open in 2015; Dr. Kimberly Moffitt, Associate Professor of American Studies at University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) and co-editor of Blackberries and Redbones: Critical Articulations of Black Hair/Body Politics in Africana Communities; and educator David Banks, President and CEO of the Eagle Academy Foundation, founding principal of the Eagle Academy for Young Men in the Bronx, and author ofSoar: How Boys Learn, Succeed, and Develop Character.

David Banks will be speaking about his book Soar: How Boys Learn, Succeed, and Develop Character, on Wednesday, October 8, 6:00pm, at the Frederick Douglass-Isaac Myers Maritime Park Museum, 1417 Thames Street in Baltimore. For more information and to RSVP, emailmjewsdouglassmyers@gmail.com.

LINK


Baltimore City: Breaking Your Heart?

Baltimore SkylineOctober 6, 2014 – Segment 3

We listen back to an archive edition of the Marc Steiner Show from last year where we discussed the article, “Baltimore City, You’re Breaking My Heart” and the many responses to it. That article recently took the title for Baltimore City Paper’s Best White Whine” of 2014. We hear from: Adam Jackson, CEO of Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle; Tim Barnett, founder of Baltimore Bike Party and author of a response to the aforementioned article, titled “Baltimore City: You’re Not Breaking My Heart. I’m not leaving”; Katie Long, Program Director and Hispanic Liaison of the Friends of Patterson Park; Hasdai Westbrook, Partner at ChangingMedia, a digital agency devoted to social change, and author of the blog post, “To #SaveBaltimore, Embrace the Wire”; Dr. Tara Bynum, assistant professor in the Department of English at Towson University; and Bobby Marvin Holmes, Youth Advocate for Baltimore Youth Advocate Programs, Inc. (BYAP) and Producer of Live Young Blood, a documentary focused on the struggle to end youth violence.

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Wil Haygood: On Inspiring ‘The Butler’

Wil HaygoodOctober 3, 2014 – Segment 4

We talk to Wil Haygood, Guggenheim and National Endowment for the Humanities fellow, who wrote the 2008 Washington Post article that inspired the film Lee Daniels’ The Butler.

This broadcast is an archive of the Marc Steiner Show.

LINK


The Long Shadow: Family Background, Disadvantaged Urban Youth, and the Transition to Adulthood

The Long ShadowOctober 2, 2014 – Segment 3

Listen to my interview with Dr. Karl Alexander, Research Professor in the Department of Sociology at Johns Hopkins University and co-author of The Long Shadow: Family Background, Disadvantaged Urban Youth, and the Transition to Adulthood. Alexander and his team tracked 800 children in Baltimore from first grade until their late 20s to discover what factors determine success. The study found that a child’s fate is often determined by family strength and the parents’ financial status.  

Karl Alexander will speak about his book The Long Shadow at Red Emma’s in Baltimore on Friday October 17th at 7:30 pm.

Podcast will be available soon.


Charles E. Cobb Jr.’s ‘This Nonviolent Stuff’ll Get You Killed: How Guns Made the Civil Rights Movement Possible’

Civil Rights marchOctober 2, 2014 – Segment 2

Listen in as I talk with Charles E. Cobb, Jr., about his book: This Nonviolent Stuff’ll Get You Killed: How Guns Made the Civil Rights Movement Possible. Cobb is a Visiting Professor of Africana Studies at Brown University. From 1962-1967 he served as a field secretary for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) in Mississippi.

This broadcast is an archive of the Marc Steiner Show.

LINK


Roundtable: Police Brutality, Perception of Black Children, and Obama

childrenSeptember 29, 2014 – Segment 2

We hear a current events roundtable discussion, and speak about: police brutality; our society’s perception of Black children; and the latest attacks from the right on President Obama. With: Marshall Bellhost of Midday Magazine with Marshall Bell on WOLB-AM, managing partner of The Bell Group, LLC, and author of Baltimore Blues: Harm CityDr. Ray Winbush, Director of the Institute for Urban Research at Morgan State University; and Dr. Kimberly Moffitt, Assistant Professor of American Studies at UMBC and co-editor of Blackberries and Redbones: Critical Articulations of Black Hair/Body Politics in Africana Communities.

LINK


Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz: An Indigenous People’s History of the United States

Roxanne Dunbar-OrtizSeptember 25, 2014 – Segment 3

Listen to my interview with Native American author, historian, feminist, and self-described revolutionary Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz on her fascinating and informative book An Indigenous People’s History of the United States.

LINK


Promises Kept: Raising Black Boys to Succeed in School and Life

american-promise-screen-captureSeptember 15, 2014 – Segment 3

Marc speaks to Dr. Joe Brewster, creators of the acclaimed documentary American Promise and authors of the new book, Promises Kept: Raising Black Boys to Succeed in School and Life. Monday evening at 7:00, he will discuss their new book as part of Open Society Institute-Baltimore’s “Talking About Race” series at the Enoch Pratt Free Library Central Branch.

LINK


Remembering Steve Biko: His Life, His Legacy & South Africa Today

Steve BikoSeptember 12, 2014 – Segment 3

We remember anti-apartheid activist Steve Biko, who was murdered on September 12, 1977, while in the custody of the South African police. Biko was an anti-apartheid activist in the 1960s and 70s and founder of the Black Consciousness Movement. We reflect upon his life, his legacy, Black Consciousness, and South Africa today, with: Dr. Rozena Maart, Director of the Centre for Critical Research on Race and Identity at the University of Kwa Zulu Natal; and Dr. Xolela Mangcu, Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Cape Town, Oppenheimer Fellow at the Hutchins Center at Harvard University, and author of Biko: A Life, the first full-length biography of Steve Biko; and Adrian Louw, Programme Integrator for Africa’s oldest community radio station project, Bush Radio 89.5FM, who served as the Media Liaison for the Parliament of the Republic of South Africa from 1999 to 2001.

 

We will also listen to the music of the Anti-Apartheid movement throughout the segment.

LINK


The State of Race, Gender, Sexuality and Sports

Ray RiceSeptember 8, 2014 – Segment 3

In light of recent news stories concerning NFL players, we turn to the topic of racial and gender issues in the NFL and sports generally. With: Dave Zirin, Sports Editor for The Nation magazine and author of a number of books including Brazil’s Dance with the Devil: The World Cup, the Olympics, and the Struggle for Democracy.

Click here to read the full email sent by Atlanta Hawks co-owner Bruce Levenson.

LINK


Remembering Fannie Lou Hamer

FANNY LOU HAMERAugust 28, 2014 – Segment 3

We look back 50 years and remember Fannie Lou Hamer’s heartrending and inspirational speech given at the 1964 Democratic National Convention in Atlantic City. With: author and songwriter John Wesley, who was Fannie Lou Hamer’s godson; and Dr. Peniel Joseph, Professor of History at Tufts University and author of the award-winning Waiting ‘Til the Midnight Hour: A Narrative History of Black Power in America and Dark Days, Bright Nights: From Black Power to Barack Obama.

LINK


Disproportionate Victimization of African Americans

morganAugust 28, 2014 – Segment 2

We discuss a teach-in and rally that will be held Thursday at Morgan State University. The event, which focuses on the disproportionate victimization of African Americans, will happen from 11:00am – 1:00pm in Jenkins 104 and the Outdoor Amphitheater. Our guests are: Dr. Jared BallAssociate Professor at Morgan State University’s School of Global Journalism and Communication, Co-Editor of Malcolm X: A Lie of Reinvention, and author of I Mix What I Like: A Mixtape Manifesto (imixwhatilike.org); and Dr. Natasha Pratt-Harris,Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at Morgan State University.

LINK


Town Hall Inspired By Ferguson: On Police Killings of Black Men

Ferguson and Beyond Town HallAugust 27, 2014 – Segment 5

We return to the topic of Ferguson, Missouri, as a lead up to a town hall webcast that will be streamed Wednesday evening, sponsored by the Institute of the Black World 21st Century. Our panel of guests includes: Don Rojas, Director of Communications and Board Member of the Institute of the Black World 21st Century (IBW); Ron Hampton, retired DC Metropolitan Police Department Community Relations Officer, DC Representative for Blacks in Law Enforcement of America, former Executive Director of the National Black Police Association, and member of the Board of IBW; and Nkechi Taifa, senior policy analyst for civil and criminal justice reform at the Open Society Foundations.

LINK


Latin@s and Ferguson

solidarityAugust 22, 2014 – Segment 5

We discuss how Latin@s are viewing the uprising and police repression in Ferguson with Marisa Franco, Leader of the National Day Laborer Organizing Network’s Not One More Campaign.

LINK


Martin Luther King III on Ferguson

mlk3August 22, 2014 – Segment 2

We’re joined for a special conversation by Martin Luther King III. We speak on the events in Ferguson, Missouri, following the shooting death of teenager Michael Brown by the Ferguson police.

LINK


Remembering 7 ‘Race Riots’ That Happened Exactly 50 Years Ago

Harlem Race RiotAugust 21, 2014 – Segment 4

We talk with Aura Bogado, contributor to The Nation and Colorlines‘ News Editor and reporter, about her article: “Remembering 7 ‘Race Riots’ That Happened Exactly 50 Years Ago.”

LINK


Baltimore Stands In Solidarity With Ferguson

West WednesdayAugust 21, 2014 – Segment 3

Yesterday, the family of Tyrone West held their weekly West Wednesday protest in front of City Hall. This week, people rallied in solidarity with Tyrone West, Michael Brown, Anthony Anderson, and other victims of police brutality. They marched through Downtown Baltimore and the Inner Harbor. Producer Mark Gunnery was there and shares some of the voices from the march and rally. Included are the voices of Michael Travis Wiggins-Bey, Tawanda Jones and Brendon Joyner.

LINK


The History Of Ferguson & Voices From The Ground

FergusonAugust 21, 2014 – Segment 2

We explore the history of Ferguson, Missouri, and hear from individuals who live there. My co-host is Dr. Lawrence Brown, Assistant Professor of Public Health at Morgan State University.

Our guests are: Jeffrey Smith, Assistant Professor in the Milano School of International Affairs, Management and Urban Policy at the New School, former Missouri state senator, and author of this article for the New Republic: “You Can’t Understand Ferguson Without First Understanding These Three Things: Reflections from a former state senator from St. Louis;” Dr. Clarence Lang, Associate Professor of African and African-American Studies and American Studies at the University of Kansas, Associate Editor of The Journal of African American History, author of Grassroots at the Gateway: Class Politics and Black Freedom Struggle in St. Louis, 1936-75, and co-editor with Robbie Lieberman of Anticommunism and the African American Freedom Movement: “Another Side of the Story;” and Senator Maria Chappelle-Nadal, Missouri state Senator for St. Louis County-District 14, who has been at the protests since the beginning.

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Baltimore in the Context of Ferguson: Police Relations, Tyrone West & More

Baltimore in solidarity with FergusonAugust 20, 2014 – Segment 4

We consider Baltimore in the context of the events of Ferguson. With: Tawanda Jones, sister of Tyrone West who died while in police custody in July 2013 in Baltimore; Diana Butler, Tyrone West’s aunt; A. Adar Ayira, project manager of the More in the Middle Campaign for Associated Black Charities and facilitator and analyst at Baltimore Racial Justice Action, a program of Fusion Partnerships; St. Louis recording artist Tef Poe; and the Rev. Kevin A. Slayton, Sr.

LINK


All Eyes On Ferguson, MO

fergusonAugust 20, 2014 – Segment 3

We return to the events in Ferguson, Missouri, following the shooting death by police of unarmed teenager Michael Brown. Our guests will include: Dr. Tara Bynum, Assistant Professor of English at Towson University; and the Rev. Kevin A. Slayton, Sr., pastor at New Waverly United Methodist Church.

LINK


Dr. Lester Spence on Michael Brown & Ferguson

Protests in FergusonAugust 19, 2014 – Segment 2

We take another look at Ferguson, Missouri, from a couple different perspectives. My co-host for this discussion is Dr. Lester Spence, Center for Emerging Media Scholar-in-Residence and Associate Professor of Political Science and Africana Studies at Johns Hopkins University, and we hear from our listeners.

We first reflect on the result of the most recent autopsy of Michael Brown and then will explore the gap between young and old activists and consider the question: Would anyone be paying attention without this type of protest?

LINK


Analyzing Ferguson: Police-Community Relations, Culture of Policing & Militarization of Police Departments

FergusonAugust 18, 2014 – Segment 2

We take an in-depth look at the situation in Ferguson, Missouri, following the shooting death of unarmed teenager Michael Brown by the police last week. The issue will be addressed from the perspectives of police/community relations, the culture of policing, and the militarization of police departments nationwide.

Our panel of guests for this discussion will include: the Rev. Dr. Heber Brown, community activist and pastor at Pleasant Hope Baptist Church; Nadra Enzi,
community policing activist in New Orleans and member of the national advisory council of the black leadership network Project 21; Adar Ayira, project manager of the More in the Middle Campaign for Associated Black Charities and facilitator and analyst at Baltimore Racial Justice Action, a program of Fusion Partnerships; Doug Ward, Director of Johns Hopkins University’s Division of Public Safety Leadership; Jacqui Robarge, Founder and Director of Power Inside; and author Kristian Williams, whose books include Hurt: Notes on Torture in a Modern Democracy and Our Enemies in Blue: Police and Power in America.

LINK


Masculinity and Violence

300-man-marchAugust 14, 2014 – Segment 2

Guest host Dr. Lawrence Brown, Assistant Professor of Public Health at Morgan State University, sits in for Marc. We turn to the topic of Masculinity and Violence. Our guests are: Michael Eugene Johnson, Executive Director of the Paul Robeson Institute for Social Change, and Bobby Marvin Holmes, youth development professional, filmmaker and co-producer Of Live Young Blood, Producer of the Anthony Mccarthy Show on WEAA.

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Mental Health in the African-American Community

healAugust 13, 2014 – Segment 2

Now more than ever, mental health in the African-American community is a crucial issue. We discuss, with: Dr. Grady Dale, clinical psychologist and co-founder of the American Institute for Urban Psychological Services; and Mothyna James-Brightful, Visionary Director for Heal A Woman To Heal A Nation.

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Reflection on the Killings of Michael Brown & Renisha McBride

Michael Brown ProtestAugust 12, 2014 – Segment 2

Dr. John Bullock, professor of Political Science at Towson University, sits in for Marc as guest host. 

We focus on the killings of Michael Brown and Renisha McBrideRenisha McBride was the 19-year old Michigan woman who was fatally shot in the face last year by Theodore Wafer after her car broke down and she walked onto Wafer’s porch seeking help. Wafer was recently convicted of second-degree murder in the shooting. Michael Brown is the teenager who was fatally shot by police in a suburb of St. Louis last Saturday; all accounts state that the young man was holding his hands in the air while police shot him multiple times.

Our panel of guests includes: Carla Murphy, reporter and blogger for Colorlines.orgDr. Margaret Flowers, organizer with PopularResistance.org and co-host of the Clearing the FOG Radio Program; and Edward Wyckoff Williams, contributing editor at The Root and Political Contributor and Special Correspondent with AlJazeera America.

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Economic Mobility: What Determines A Child’s Success in Baltimore?

Baltimore SkylineAugust 11, 2014 – Segment 2

We speak with Karl Alexander, Research Professor in the Department of Sociology at Johns Hopkins University and co-author of The Long Shadow: Family Background, Disadvantaged Urban Youth, and the Transition to Adulthood. We talk about a 30-year study in which Alexander and his team tracked 800 children in Baltimore from first grade until their late 20’s to discover what factors determine success. The study found that a child’s fate is often determined by family strength and the parents’ financial status.

We then discuss the findings with Bill Fletcher, Senior Scholar at Institute for Policy Studies; Dr. Karsonya “Kaye” Whitehead, Assistant Professor of Communication and Affiliate Assistant Professor of African and African American Studies at Loyola University Maryland; Jordan Bloom, Opinion Editor for the Daily Caller and board member of Alumni for Liberty, a project of the Students for Liberty; and  A. Adar Ayira, project manager of the More in the Middle Campaign for Associated Black Charities and facilitator and analyst at Baltimore Racial Justice Action, a program of Fusion Partnerships.

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Sugar Changed the World: A Story of Magic, Spice, Slavery, Freedom, and Science

sugarAugust 6, 2014 – Segment 2

What does the sweet stuff you put in your coffee have to do with the French Revolution? Or the history of slavery in the Caribbean and United States? We find out in this conversation with Marc Aronson and Marina Budhos, authors of Sugar Changed the World: A Story of Magic, Spice, Slavery, Freedom, and Science.

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Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle

dayvonadamJuly 31, 2014 – Segment 4

We speak with members of Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle about projects they are working on now. We are joined by Adam Jackson, CEO, Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle; and Dayvon Love, Director of Research and Public Policy, Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle.


Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle Update

dayvonadamJuly 30, 2014 – Segment 5

We speak with members of Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle about projects they are working on now. We are joined by Adam Jackson, CEO, Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle; and Dayvon Love, Director of Research and Public Policy, Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle.

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National News Roundtable: Police Brutality, Ray Rice, Immigration

garnerJuly 28, 2014 – Segment 2

We discuss the national news from this week with a panel of experts. Are incidents of police brutality like the Eric Garner killing isolated or evidence of institutionalized problems? Was the Ravens’ reaction to Ray Rice’s incident appropriate?

Our guests will be: Dr. Richard Vatz, Professor of Rhetoric and Communication at Towson University’s Department of Instructional Leadership and Professional Development; Dr. Karsonya “Kaye” Whitehead, Assistant Professor of Communication and Affiliate Assistant Professor of African and African American Studies at Loyola University Maryland; Dr. Anika Simpson, Professor in the Department of Philosopy and Religious Studies at Morgan State University; and longtime journalist and commentator Bob Somerby, Editor of The Daily Howler.

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Remembering Nelson Mandela

mandelaJuly 18, 2014 – Segment 2

We rebroadcast our special two-hour tribute to Nelson Mandela to honor his birthday. You will hear from a vast array of guests from around the globe – some of whom fought with Mandela in the struggle to end Apartheid – who will discuss the life and legacy of this legendary international leader and fighter for justice.

Our first guest is Brenda Leonard, Managing Director of Bush Radio in Cape Town, South Africa, who will talk about who Mandela was and how South Africa reacted to the news of his death. Leonard was an officer in the military wing of the African National Congress (ANC).

We then turn to the topic of the history of the struggle against Apartheid. Our guests are: Dr. Robert Edgar, Professor of African Studies at Howard University; and Danny Schechter, who created the South Africa Now series, made 6 documentaries with Nelson Mandela and just published Madiba A to Z: the Many Faces of Nelson Mandela in association with the Mandela Long Walk To Freedom Movie; and Brenda Leonard.

In the second hour, we examine Mandela’s legacy and the contemporary politics of South Africa. Joining us are: Dr. Patrick Bond, Professor at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where he has directed the Centre for Civil Society since 2004; Dr. Simon Stacey, Director of the Honors College at University of Maryland Baltimore CountyEmira Woods, co-Director of Foreign Policy In Focus at the Institute for Policy Studies, and an expert on U.S. foreign policy with a special emphasis on Africa; and Zane Ibrahim, joining us from the Netherlands, who grew up in the time of Mandela’s activities and was in exile at the time of the resistance.

 

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Honduras, The Immigration Crisis At The Border & Black/Latino Relations

Honduras and the Immigration CrisisJuly 16, 2014 – Segment 2

We turn to the topic of Honduras and the border crisis, with co-host Dr. Lawrence Brown, Assistant Professor of Public Health at Morgan State University.

Our guest is the Rev. Dr. Raymond Terry, who has led health experiential trips for students around the world and is with the School of Community Health and Policy at Morgan State University.

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Where Is America One Year After George Zimmerman’s Acquittal?

Family of Trayvon MartinJuly 15, 2014 – Segment 3

We reflect upon the acquittal of George Zimmerman in the killing of Trayvon Martin, a verdict which was handed down a year ago this week. With: Edward Wyckoff Williams, Contributing Editor at The Root and Political Contributor and Special Correspondent with AlJazeera America; and Dr. Raymond Winbush, Director of the Institute for Urban Research at Morgan State University.

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Charles Cobb: This Nonviolent Stuff’ll Get You Killed

Guns in the civil rights movementJuly 14, 2014 – Segment 2

Today, we talk with Charles E. Cobb Jr. about his new book: This Nonviolent Stuff’ll Get You Killed: How Guns Made the Civil Rights Movement Possible. Cobb is a Visiting Professor of Africana Studies at Brown University and Senior Writer and Diplomatic Correspondent for AllAfrica.com. From 1962-1967 he served as a field secretary for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) in Mississippi.

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National News Roundtable: Fear Of A Black Planet?

fear of black planetJuly 7, 2014 – Segment 2

Marc discusses attempts to impeach Barack Obama, the duel-faced bumper-sticker nature of the rhetoric against Obama, and the institutionalized and embedded racism in our culture, with a panel of experts:  Dr. Lawrence Brown, Assistant Professor of Public Health at Morgan State University; E.R. Shipp, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, Journalist-in-Residence and Associate Professor of Journalism at Morgan State University; and Jackie Wellfonder, conservative activist and blogger.

 

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On Election Day: State of Voting Rights with NAACP President Lorraine Miller

Shelby County v. HolderJune 24, 2014 – Segment 3

On the day of the Maryland primary election, we are joined by Lorraine Miller, Interim President and CEO of the NAACP, to discuss the state of voting rights, one year after the Supreme Court’s landmark decision in Shelby County v. Holder.

 

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National News Roundtable: Central Park Five Settlement, Foreign Policy and More

Central Park FiveJune 24, 2014 – Segment 2

We discuss the national news with: Jordan Bloom, Opinion Editor for the Daily Caller and board member of Alumni for Liberty, a project of the Students for Liberty; and Dr. Lawrence Brown, Assistant Professor of Public Health at Morgan State University.

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The Washington NFL Team Loses Its Trademark

redskinsJune 23, 2014 – Segment 3

We turn to the ongoing controversy over the name of the Washington NFL team, in light of last week’s cancellation of the team’s trademark registration by the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board. In a 99-page decision, the Board said the team’s name and logo are disparaging to Native Americans. Joining us are: Mark Trahant, an independent print and media journalist; Suzan Shown Harjo, (Cheyenne and Hodulgee) President of The Morning Star Institute, a national Native rights organization, columnist for Indian Country Today Media Network, and past Executive Director of the National Congress of American Indians; and Julie A. Hopkins, partner at Tydings and Rosenberg LLP where she practices Intellectual Property and Technology Law.

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The Other Blacklist: The African American Literary and Cultural Left of the 1950s

washingtonJune 11, 2014 – Segment 4

We’re joined by Mary Helen Washington, Professor in the English Department at the University of Maryland, College Park, to talk about her new book, The Other Blacklist: The African American Literary and Cultural Left of the 1950s. Washington is speaking tonight at Red Emma’s at 7:30.

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Lead Paint Lawsuit and Kennedy Krieger Institute

leadpaintJune 11, 2014 – Segment 3

We discuss a lawsuit involving Kennedy Krieger Institute, which is being accused of knowingly exposing black children as young as a year old to lead poisoning in the 1990s as part of a study exploring the hazards of lead paint. We’re joined by: 

  • Dr. Ray Winbush, Director of the Institute for Urban Research at Morgan State University;
  • William Murphy Jr., Founder and a Senior Partner of Murphy, Falcon & Murphy in Baltimore;
  • Dr. Gerald Markowitz, Distinguished Professor at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice at the City University Of New York and co-author, with David Rosner, of Lead Wars: The Politics of Science and the Fate of America’s Children; 
  • Dr. David Buchanan, Professor and Director of the Institute for Global Health at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and co-author of Justice and Fairness in the Kennedy Krieger Institute Lead Paint Study: The Ethics of Public Health Research on Less Expensive, Less Effective Interventions;
  • and Dr. Kristal Brent Zook, award-winning journalist, director of the MA Journalism Program at Hofstra University and author of Black Women’s Lives: Stories of Power and Pain. She can be found at www.kristalbrentzook.com and tweets at @kristalzook.

LINK


Exploring African-American/Latino Community Relations in Baltimore

Left to right, praying at the end of a press conference: Jose Dominguez, Edwin Vasquez, Yanderi Hernandez. Representatives from hispanic and African American communities held a press conference at CASA de Maryland regarding ideas to prevent violence between the two communities. (Barbara Haddock Taylor, Baltimore Sun)June 4, 2014 – Segment 2

In response to the recent killing of a Latino Digital Harbor High School student, we examine African American and Latino relations in Baltimore, with: Luis Larin, United Workers Leadership Organizer; Lawrence Grandpre, Assistant Director of Research and Public Policy for Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle and an alumnus of Baltimore City Public Schools; Misael Garcia, youth leader and CASA de Maryland Board Member; and Dr. Lawrence Brown, activist, public health consultant, and Assistant Professor of Public Health at Morgan State University.

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Debating Reparations: Exploring the Politics & Economics

The September 1966 Cicero protest against housing discrimination was one of the first nonviolent civil-rights campaigns launched near a major city. (Associated Press)June 2, 2014 – Segment 3

Our distinguished panel of guests will discuss and debate the issues raised in essayist Ta-Nehisi Coates’ The Case for Reparations“:

  • Dr. Nathan Connolly, Assistant Professor in the Department of History at Johns Hopkins University and author of A World More Concrete: Real Estate and the Remaking of Jim Crow South;
  • Hughey P. Newsome, member of the national advisory council of the Project 21 black leadership network, member of the MoveOnUp.org black political network, and blogger at The Objective Citizenwww.theobjectivecitizen.com;
  • Reniqua Allen, Emerging Voices Fellow at Demoswhere she writes for their PolicyShop blog, and former producer for Moyers & Company;
  • Dr. Peniel Joseph, Professor of History at Tufts University and author of the award-winning Waiting ‘Til the Midnight Hour: A Narrative History of Black Power in America and Dark Days, Bright Nights: From Black Power to Barack Obama;
  • and W. James Antle III, Editor of the Daily Caller News Foundation, Senior Editor of the American Spectator, Contributing Editor to the American Conservative, and author of the book Devouring Freedom: Can Big Government Ever Be Stopped?

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Ta-Nehisi Coates: The Case for Reparations

The Case for ReparationsJune 2, 2014 – Segment 2

In the cover story for the June issue of The Atlantic, essayist Ta-Nehisi Coates makes “The Case for Reparations.” Coates argues that Black Americans as a group – because of slavery, segregation, and Federal housing policy – have been prevented from building inter-generational wealth.

We begin the show with my interview with Ta-Nehisi Coates about his article, which has reignited a national discussion on the topic of reparations.

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Sojourner Truth’s “Ain’t I A Woman?”: African American Women & Feminism

Sojourner TruthMay 30, 2014 – Segment 3

May 29 marked the 163rd anniversary of Sojourner Truth’s “Ain’t I a Woman?” speech. Center for Emerging Media cultural correspondent Lea Gilmore joins us for a reading of that speech. Then, we discuss African American women and feminism with:

  • Lea Gilmore, singer, activist, and Center for Emerging Media cultural correspondent;
  • dream hampton, writer, filmmaker and co-author of the New York Times best seller Decoded
  • A. Adar Ayira, project manager of the More in the Middle Campaign for Associated Black Charities and facilitator and analyst at Baltimore Racial Justice Action;
  • Jodi Kelber-Kaye, Associate Director of the Honors College at UMBC and former faculty member in Gender and Women’s Studies there.

This segment originally aired May 29, 2013.

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We’re Dreaming if We Think We’ve Dealt With Racism

Attorney General Eric HolderMay 27, 2014 – Segment 3

We talk with columnist and political analyst Edward Wyckoff Williams about the piece he recently wrote for The Root: “We’re Dreaming if We Think We’ve Dealt With Racism.” Williams is Contributing Editor at The Root and a contributor to Al Jazeera America. He appears on MSNBC, CNN, ABC, CBS Washington and national syndicated radio.

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Conversation With Eddie Conway

conwayMay 26, 2014 – Segment 2

We listen to tape from a special evening Marc hosted with Eddie Conway last week at Red Emma’s. Eddie Conway is a former Black Panther who was released from prison earlier this year after being incarcerated for 44 years. He discusses his time in prison, his work with young men inside and outside prison, and Friend of a Friend, a mentoring project he started with American Friends Service Committee.  Friend of a Friend works to reduce institutional violence by providing tools that build healthy relationships, create support structures, and develop effective communication skills. We also hear from Green Bay, one of the young men Eddie mentored who is part of Friend of a Friend.

 LINK


60 Years After Brown v. Board & The Resegregation of America’s Schools

Brown v. Board of EducationMay 21, 2014 – Segment 4

Saturday was the 60th anniversary of the landmark Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court decision, which established that separate public schools for black children and white children was unconstitutional. We remember that decision and look at today’s schools, with: 

  • E.R. Shipp, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, Journalist-in-Residence and Associate Professor of Journalism at Morgan State University; 
  • Daniel Denvir, reporter at the Philadelphia City Paper and contributor toThe GuardianSalon and The New Republic, who wrote about “The Resegregation of America’s Schools” for Al Jazeera America;
  • A. Adar Ayira, project manager of the More in the Middle Campaign for Associated Black Charities and facilitator and analyst at Baltimore Racial Justice Action, a program of Fusion Partnerships;
  • and longtime journalist and commentator Bob Somerby, Editor of The Daily Howler.

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What’s White Male Privilege and Why Is It So Difficult To Talk About?

White Male PrivilegeMay 15, 2014 – Segment 3

We ask the questions: What Is White Male Privilege? And Why Is It So Hard To Talk About? Inspired by the discussion around Princeton Freshman Tal Fortgang’s controversial essay on the topic of privilege, reprinted in Time last week, we talk with our panel:

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Everyman Theatre: By The Way, Meet Vera Stark

By The Way Meet Vera StarkMay 9, 2014 – Segment 3

We talk with three of the actors in Everyman Theatre’s current production of By The Way, Meet Vera StarkIf you haven’t yet seen this production, make sure to go this weekend (it closes on Sunday)! By The Way, Meet Vera Stark is a play by Lynn Nottage about the intersections of race in 1930s Hollywood. I sat down last week for a fun and compelling conversation with Yaegel WelchBeth Hylton, and Kathryn Tkel. 

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Taylor Branch on Citizenship & Freedom: Memphis 1968, and Afterward

Taylor Branch and Harry BelafonteMay 5, 2014 – Segment 3

We talk with Pulitzer Prize-winning author of the America in the King Years TrilogyTaylor Branch, about the course he teaches at the University of Baltimore, ” Citizenship & Freedom: The Civil Rights Era.” On Tuesday evening, May 6, at 5:30, acclaimed singer, actor, and human rights activist Harry Belafonte will be the featured guest at the final seminar for Branch’s class. The topic will be “Memphis 1968, and Afterward.” This class will be open for Baltimore-area visitors. Visit freedomclass.org for more information.


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World Of The Play: Race And Representation

vera starkMay 2, 2014 – Segment 4

We hear an illuminating discussion that took place last Saturday at Everyman Theatre as part of their World of the Play series. The topic was Race and Representation: “Our greatest accomplishment. Our greatest shame.” Our exceptional panel of guests shared their commentaries on race, theatre, and film, drawing from the current production at Everyman, By the Way, Meet Vera Stark by Lynn Nottage. You will hear from: playwright and dramaturg Jacqueline Lawton, who was named one of the top 30 of the nation’s leading black playwrights by Arena Stage’s American Voices New Play Institute; Dr. Kimberly Moffitt, professor of American Studies at UMBC and author of Blackberries and Redbones: Critical Articulations of Black Hair/Body Politics in Africana Communities; and Otis Cortez Ramsey-Zoe, Lecturer of Theatre Arts at Howard University and Associate Artistic Director at banished? productions.

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What Does Outrage Around LA Clipper’s Donald Sterling Mean?

Donald Sterling, V. StivianoApril 30, 2014 – Segment 2

We discuss the outrage surrounding Los Angeles Clipper’s owner Donald Sterling. Today, NBA Commissioner Adam Silver banned Sterling for life for making racist comments in a recorded conversation, and fined him $2.5 million. It is anticipated that Sterling will be removed from the league. Joining us for this conversation are: Dr. Tara Bynum, Assistant Professor of English at Towson University; Ali Danois, a senior writer and editor of The Shadow League and co-host of WEAA’s Blacktop Xchange Sports Report; and Dr. Jared Ball, Associate Professor of Media Studies in the School of Global Journalism and Communication at Morgan State University.

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Donald Sterling’s Racist Comments

donald-sterlingApril 28, 2014 – Segment 4

We discuss Clippers’ owner Donald Sterling’s racist statements about African Americans, released last Friday. We’re joined by Ali Danois, Senior Editor of Bounce Magazine and co-host of the Blacktop Xchange Sports Report on WEAA; and Dr. Lester Spence, Center for Emerging Media Scholar-in-Residence and Associate Professor of Political Science and Africana Studies at Johns Hopkins University, who wrote this piece on Sterling.

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NAACP Criminal Justice Director Dr. Niaz Kasravi

niazApril 28, 2014 – Segment 2

We have a conversation with NAACP Criminal Justice Director Dr. Niaz Kasravi about mass incarceration and the war on drugs.

 

 

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What If African Americans Were in Charge of the Literary World?

Felicia PrideApril 21, 2014 – Segment 4

We look at African American representation in literature and the arts, asking What if African Americans were in charge of the literary world? Our guest will be author and film producer Felicia Pride.

 

This segment originally aired April 15, 2009.

LINK


Baltimore’s African American & Latino Communities Talk Tension

African American and Latino CommunitiesApril 18, 2014 – Hour 1

We travel back to 2010 to a show featuring leaders from Baltimore’s African American and Latino communities. In recent weeks on the Marc Steiner Show and Anthony McCarthy Show we have noted that many of the tensions that we explored in this conversation are still present between the communities. In August 2010, a 51-year-old Honduran man named Martin Reyes was beaten to death by a mentally ill man who said he hated “Mexicans.” This tragic death occurred only a month after Reyes’ nephew Juan de Dios Hernandez was shot in the forehead.

Our guests for this conversations were: Reverend Hector Rodriguez, Co-Vicar of the Episcopal Church of the Resurrection; Luis Larin, Organizer for the United Workers; Dr. Marvin “Doc” Cheatham, former President of the Baltimore Branch of the NAACP, the local chapter of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, and the Greater Baltimore Chapter of the National Action Network; and Earl Ofari Hutchinson,political analyst and author of ten books, including The Latino Challenge to Black America.

This segment originally aired August 26, 2010.

LINK


Tragic Shooting in Kansas City: Is It an Act of Terror?

Kansas City ShootingApril 16, 2014 – Segment 4

We turn our attention to Sunday’s tragic shooting in Kansas City, where a self-proclaimed white supremacist murdered three people outside a Jewish community center. One of the questions we consider is why this incident hasn’t been labeled a terrorist act.

Our guests are: A. Adar Ayirah, Project Manager of the More in the Middle Campaign for Associated Black Charities and facilitator and analyst at Baltimore Racial Justice Action, a program of Fusion Partnerships; Zainab Chaudry, Executive Director of the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) Maryland; and Devin Burghart, Vice President of Institute for Research and Education on Human Rights and co-author of Guns & Gavels: Common Law Courts, Militias & White Supremacy.

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Remembering Karyn Washington

karyn washingtonApril 15, 2014 – Segment 2

We remember Karyn Washington, creator of For Brown Girls, a movement to empower and uplift darker-skinned Black women, who died of an apparent suicide this past weekend. Our guests are: Ty Alexander, beauty and lifestyle writer based in New York and originally from Baltimore; and Baltimore based performing artist, Black Shesus.

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Forbidden Fruit: Love Stories from the Underground Railroad

Forbidden Fruit

April 11, 2014 – Hour 2

This week is the WEAA Happiness Spring Membership Drive, so tune in for compelling topics and wonderful premiums! Now is your opportunity to support the station you have come to love: WEAA, THE Voice of the Community. Call 410-319-8888 or visit weaa.org to make your pledge of support during the show.

I talk to award-winning journalist Betty DeRamus about her fascinating book, Forbidden Fruit: Love Stories from the Underground Railroad. The book tells the largely untold tales of ordinary men and women who faced mobs, bloodhounds, bounty hunters, and bullets to be together — and defy a system that categorized blacks not only as servants, but as property.

This segment originally aired February 14, 2014.

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How To Say I Love You In Indian

Gyasi RossApril 11, 2014 – Hour 1

This week is the WEAA Happiness Spring Membership Drive, so tune in for compelling topics and wonderful premiums! Now is your opportunity to support the station you have come to love: WEAA, THE Voice of the Community. Call 410-319-8888 or visit weaa.org to make your pledge of support during the show.

We talk the foundations of love and more with author and lawyer Gyasi Ross talks about his book How to Say I Love You in Indian. Ross is a member of the Blackfeet Indian Nation and also comes from the Suquamish Nation.

This segment originally aired March 21, 2014.

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Body and Soul: The Black Panther Party and the Fight Against Medical Discrimination

Body and SoulApril 10, 2014 – Hour 1

This week is the WEAA Happiness Spring Membership Drive, so tune in for compelling topics and wonderful premiums! Now is your opportunity to support the station you have come to love: WEAA, THE Voice of the Community. Call 410-319-8888 or visit weaa.org to make your pledge of support during the show.

We talk about the book Body and Soul: The Black Panther Party and the Fight Against Medical Discrimination, with author Dr. Alondra Nelson, professor of Sociology and Gender Studies at Columbia University.

This interview originally aired March 7, 2014.

LINK


Unpacking The Asian-American “Model Minority” Stereotype

BEIJING, CHINA - FEBRUARY 17: (CHINA OUT) Members of a family toast during New Year's Eve dinner at a resident's home on February 17, 2007 in Beijing, China. The Chinese lunar New Year, or the Spring Festival, falls on February 18. (Photo by China Photos/Getty Images)March 26, 2014 – Segment 4

We examine the stereotype of Asians as a “Model Minority” that outperforms other minorities. Our guests are: Imara Jones, who wrote an article for Colorlines titled “The Economic Truth About the ‘Model Minority;'” Sine Hwang Jensen, a member of Baltimore Racial Justice Action and member of Moonroot Collective; and Suey Park, writer and activist based in Chicago who created the hashtag #NotYourAsianSidekick on Twitter.

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Where Are The People Of Color In Children’s Books?

kidsbooksMarch 20, 2014 – Segment 2

Last week in the New York Times’ Sunday Review, an opinion piece by children’s book author Walter Dean Myers was published, titled “Where Are the People of Color in Children’s Books?” To answer the question, we talk to: Dr. Charles Johnson, National Book Award-winning novelist and scholar, who co-authored (with his daughter Elisheba) the children’s book Bending Time: The Adventures of Emery Jones, Boy Science Wonder; Tonya Bolden, award-winning author of over twenty books for young readers and adults, including Searching for Sarah Rector: The Richest Black Girl in America; and Deborah Taylor, School and Student Services Coordinator for the Enoch Pratt Free Library in Baltimore.

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Stokely Carmichael: His Life and Legacy

stokelyMarch 18, 2014 – Segment 2

We talk to Dr. Peniel E. Joseph, about the life & legacy of Stokely Carmichael. Dr. Joseph is a Professor of History at Tufts University, Founding Director of the Center for the Study of Race and Democracy at Tufts, and author of the biography, Stokely: A Life.

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Philosopher’s Roundtable: Defining & Exploring Institutional Racism

African American flood victims lined up to get food & clothing fr. Red Cross relief station in front of billboard extolling WORLD'S HIGHEST STANDARD OF   LIVING/ THERE'S NO WAY LIKE THE AMERICAN WAY. City: LOUISVILLE State: KY Country: US Photographer: MARGARET BOURKE-WHITE/TimePixMarch 3, 2014 – Segment 3

Institutional racism is something we hear a lot about, but something that is not often enough defined. We look at its definition and historical roots, especially as they relate to today. Our panel of guests includes:

This segment originally aired February 4, 2013.

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Remembering Jackson Mayor Chokwe Lumumba & Trayvon Martin

Chokwe LumumbaFebruary 26, 2014 – Segment 3

Wednesday is the second anniversary of the tragic shooting death of Trayvon Martin, our panel addresses revisits Trayvon’s death and examines where we have come as a society since that day. With:

  • Edward Wyckoff Williams, contributing Editor at The Root and political contributor and Special Correspondent with Al Jazeera America;
  • Lenny McAllister, author, conservative media personality and public speaker;
  • Michelle Antoinette aka LOVE the Poet, spoken word artist and musician;
  • Dr. Karsonya Wise Whitehead, Assistant Professor of Communication and Affiliate Assistant Professor of African and African American Studies at Loyola University Maryland;
  • and author and songwriter John Milton Wesley.

We also reflect on the death of Jackson Mayor Chokwe Lumumba.

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CeCe McDonald, Trans Woman & Activist, Released From Prison

CeCe McDonaldFebruary 20, 2014 – Segment 3

Listen to our interview with CeCe McDonald, a transgender woman and activist from Minneapolis, and Katie Burgess, Executive Director of Trans Youth Support Network in Minneapolis.  McDonald was released from prison on January 13th after serving 19 months for her alleged involvement in stabbing a man with scissors. Supporters of McDonald say that she was defending herself against a group of people who came at her and her friends with a bar glass, in a racist and trans-phobic attack. She was held in a men’s prison, even though she identifies as a trans woman.

DOWNLOAD

 


Craig Steven Wilder On “Ebony And Ivy”

Craig Wilder, author of the new book "Ebony and Ivy: Race, Slavery and the Troubled History of American's Universities" poses for a portrait on the Massachusetts Institute of Technology campus in Cambridge, Massachusetts on October 7, 2013.February 19, 2014 – Segment 4

Craig Steven Wilder, author of Ebony & Ivy: The Secret History of How Slavery Helped Build America’s Elite Colleges, joins us to talk about the legacy of slavery in the Ivy League.

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Gyasi Ross on Richard Sherman, White Privilege, Racism & Being a Brown Man

gyasi rossFebruary 7, 2014 – Segment 2

We talk to Gyasi Ross – father, writer, entrepreneur, attorney, and member of the Blackfeet Tribe – about his most recent articles, “Big Brown Men, Richard Sherman and the Fire Next Time,” and “Is There a Problem? Racism, White Privilege and That ‘Scary’ Brown Man.”

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Richard Sherman and the Implications of the Word “Thug”

SEATTLE, WA - DECEMBER 09:  Cornerback Richard Sherman #25 of the Seattle Seahawks celebrates on the bench near the end of the game against the Arizona Cardinals at CenturyLink Field on December 9, 2012 in Seattle, Washington. The Seahawks defeated the Cardinals 58-0.  (Photo by Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images) *** Local Caption *** Richard ShermanJanuary 28, 2014 – Segment 2

Did you see the clip of Richard Sherman after the Seattle Seahawks defeated the San Francisco 49ers in last week’s NFC Championship game? He’s been called a “thug” by some, while others have come to his defense. What do you think, and why is this discussion important?

Joining us to talk about the Richard Sherman controversy and its implications for our larger society are: Ali Danois, Senior Editor of Bounce Magazine; and Dave Zirin, sports correspondent for The Nationand author of Game Over: How Politics Has Turned the Sports World Upside Down.

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Craig Steven Wilder, Author of ‘Ebony & Ivy,’ On How Slavery Built the Ivy League

Craig Wilder, author of the new book "Ebony and Ivy: Race, Slavery and the Troubled History of American's Universities" poses for a portrait on the Massachusetts Institute of Technology campus in Cambridge, Massachusetts on October 7, 2013.January 16, 2014 – Segment 5

We close out the show with Craig Steven Wilder, author of Ebony & Ivy: The Secret History of How Slavery Helped Build America’s Elite Colleges.

Wilder will be speaking at Red Emma‘s Thursday evening at 7:30.

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Cultural Crossroads: Where’s The Color At The Golden Globes?

Golden GlobeJanuary 15, 2014 – Segment 4

We continue our Cultural Crossroads conversation with Center for Emerging Media Cultural Editor and chanteuse extraordinaire Lea Gilmore! Why were there no African American artists with Billboard Number One hit singles in 2013? Were African American actors and directors snubbed at the Golden Globes? We talk about all that and more.

 


Forget Duck Dynasty: There Are Important Civil Rights Battles To Fight

IFILLJanuary 6, 2014 – Segment 3

Sherrilyn Ifill, President and Director-Counsel of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, joins us to talk about how media hype around bigoted comments made by public figures can distract us from focusing on important civil rights struggles. Last week Ifill wrote an article for The Root: “Forget Duck Dynasty: There Are Important Civil Rights Battles To Fight.”

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