The Marc Steiner Show

History – Page 2

Studs Terkel: Politics, Culture, but Mostly Conversation

studsSeptember 22, 2016 – Segment 1

We speak with author and oral historian Alan Wieder, about his new book Studs Terkel: Politics, Culture, but Mostly Conversation.
Alan Wieder will talk about his book Studs Terkel: Politics, Culture, but Mostly Conversation, Thursday September 22 at 7:30 PM at Red Emma’s Bookstore Café.

The Slave’s Cause: A History of Abolition

Manisha SinhaSeptember 9, 2016 – Segment 4

Marc interviews Dr. Manisha SinhaProfessor and Graduate Program Director of Afro-American Studies at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. She is author of the new book The Slave’s Cause: A History of Abolition.


Dr. Nancy Isenberg: White Trash & Class In America

White Trash, 500 Years of Class in AmericaSeptember 2, 2016 – Segment 2

I host an interview with historian and author Dr. Nancy Isenberg about her new book White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America. Dr. Isenberg is the T. Harry Williams Professor of History at Louisiana State University.


Event Preview: Fades and Fellowship

July 22, 2016 – Segment 316.07.23 Cuts And Conversation

On the show we preview an upcoming event at Baltimore’s Reginald F. Lewis Museum: Fades and Fellowship, a theatrical commentary that uses a barbershop as a backdrop and blends storytelling, music, and real life conversations with reflective stories about some of the most pressing issues affecting not only the communities in which Black barbershops reside, but also those of our larger collective consciousness of America. I’ll be talking with: Nelson Malden, who was the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s barber; Dr. LaMarr Darnell Shields, co-Founder and Senior Director of Education and Innovation for the Cambio Group and Darius Wilmore Creative Director for Taharka Brothers .

 


Philosopher’s Roundtable: Policing & The Attack On #BlackLivesMatter

NYC action in solidarity with Ferguson. Mo, encouraging a boycott of Black Friday Consumerism.July 21, 2016 – Segment 2

It’s a Philosopher’s Roundtable on topics to include policing and the current attack on #BlackLivesMatter, with: Dr. Robert Birt, author of The Liberatory Thought of Martin Luther King Jr.: Critical Essays on the Philosopher King and Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Bowie State University; Navasha Daya, singer, songwriter, and co-Founder and Director of the healing and performing arts at the Youth Resiliency Institute; and Denzel Mitchell, Baltimore City resident, educator, farmer, and food justice advocate.


From The Archives — Charles Johnson On The Anniversary Of ‘Middle Passage’

Charles JohnsonJuly 15, 2016 – Segment 4

Scholar and author Charles Johnson talks about the 25th anniversary of his National Book-award winning novel Middle Passage.


White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America

White TrashJuly 15, 2016 – Segment 2

I interview historian and author Dr. Nancy Isenberg on her new book White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America. Dr. Isenberg is the T. Harry Williams Professor of History at Louisiana State University.


The Slave’s Cause: A History of Abolition

Manisha SinhaJune 15, 2016 – Segment 1

I interview Dr. Manisha SinhaProfessor and Graduate Program Director of Afro-American Studies at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. She is author of the amazing new book The Slave’s Cause: A History of Abolition.


Tengella’s Take: Remembering Muhammad Ali

Koli TengellaJune 10, 2016 – Segment 1

We host the newest edition of  our weekly segment Tengella’s Take with Koli Tengella. Koli is President of Tengella Edutainment, an instructor and creator of the Positive Social Change Performing Arts Program at Augusta Fells Savage Institute of Visual Arts High School, and he was a 2010 Open Society Institute Fellow.


Tension City: Inside The Presidential Debates From Kennedy-Nixon To McCain-Obama

Jim LehrerJune 9, 2016 – Segment 2

We close the first hour with an archive edition of our show that is very relevant in light of today’s electoral climate: My 2012 interview with Jim Lehrer about his book Tension City: Inside the Presidential Debates from Kennedy-Nixon to McCain-Obama.


From The Archives: The Nazi Séance — The Strange Story of the Jewish Psychic in Hitler’s Circle

The Nazi Seance (Credit: Amazon)June 3, 2016 – Segment 4

We host a special archive edition of The Marc Steiner Show, my interview with Baltimore author Arthur Magida about his book The Nazi Séance: The Strange Story of the Jewish Psychic in Hitler’s Circle. The book follows Erik Jan Hanussen, a famous Jewish mind reader who advised leading Nazi figures, and Hitler himself, in the lead-up to World War II.


Roots: The Remake & The Impact Of The Original Series

RootsMay 31, 2016 – Segment 3

Did you watch the premiere of the new Roots series this week? We discuss the remake of the groundbreaking series with: Dr. Lester Spence, Center for Emerging Media Scholar-In-Residence, Associate Professor of Political Science and Africana Studies at Johns Hopkins University, and author of Knocking the Hustle: Against the Neoliberal Turn in Black Politics, and Stare in the Darkness: The Limits of Hip-hop and Black Politics; David Zurawik, Ph.D., Baltimore Sun media critic and Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication & Media Studies at Goucher College; and Carla Wills, Senior News Producer at Democracy Now!

Reels From the Attic: Preview With Joe Tropea

Reels From the Attic (Credit: Red Emma's)May 25, 2016 – Segment 2

We host an interview with Joe Tropea, Digital Projects Coordinator for the Maryland Historical Society, offers a preview of an event happening Wednesday  evening at Red Emma’s 2640 Space, Reels From the Attic: Bob and Teresa’s Documentary Picks and Not-Fiction OdditiesReels From the Attic is a selection of 16mm films & video curated by local film fiends Teresa & Bob.

Reels From the Attic: Bob and Teresa’s Documentary Picks and Not-Fiction Oddities with special guest Denny Lynch takes place Wednesday May 25 at 7pm at 2640 Space, 2640 St. Paul Street in Baltimore. Enjoy two sets of vintage short films and videos about historic Baltimore and beyond, and then stick around to talk about them. Some local, some lovely, some fun or funny. All vintage in content and format, projected, for free.

The Slave’s Cause: A History Of Abolition

Manisha SinhaMay 20, 2016 – Segment 1

I interview Dr. Manisha SinhaProfessor and Graduate Program Director of Afro-American Studies at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. She is author of the amazing new book The Slave’s Cause: A History of Abolition.


From The Archives: The Role Of Black Nationalism In Today’s Political & Cultural Landscape

Malcolm XMay 19, 2016 – Segment 2

We turn to a conversation about Black nationalism and its role in the political and cultural landscape today. Our guests include: Dr. Lester Spence, Center for Emerging Media Scholar-In-Residence and Associate Professor of Political Science and Africana Studies at Johns Hopkins University and author of Knocking the Hustle: Against the Neoliberal Turn in Black Politics; author and songwriter John Wesley; and Dr. Jeff Menzise, licensed school psychologist in Washington, DC, and author of Dumbin’ Down: Reflections on the Mis-Education of the Negro.


Downtown Voices: Episode 4 — The Uprising

Photo Credit: Stefanie MavronisMay 19, 2016 – Segment 1

Students involved in a recent project at UMBC have been collecting stories of Baltimore communities as they change and grow, meeting people where they are and listening to their stories. The project is called Baltimore Traces: Communities in Transition and it’s made possible by a Hrabowski Innovation Fund grant. This semester’s radio series, Downtown Voices, features students talking to city dwellers about their thoughts on the past, present, and future of Baltimore.

Today you will hear “The Uprising,” a snapshot of the movement that developed in the wake of Freddie Gray’s death, and the effect it has had on our city. Written by Michael Stone and Produced by Calvin Perry, both of Baltimore Traces.


Politics: Bernie Sanders, Race & Black Folks

Bernie SandersMay 18, 2016 – Segment 3

We turn to politics with a discussion on Bernie Sanders, Race and Black Folks. With: Kalima Young, instructor at Towson University and University of Maryland College Park; and Marshall “Eddie” Conway, Producer at the Real News Network‘s Baltimore Bureau, former Black Panther leader and political prisoner, and co-author of Marshall Law: The Life and Times of a Baltimore Black Panther.

Eddie Conway will give us a preview of an event happening this Thursday, May 19, which is Malcolm X’s birthday: A free film screening of the Real Newsdocumentary X: The Final Years. For more information click here.

At the end of the segment, Marc receives a special birthday surprise from good friend and actor Bob Wisdom.


Minister Carlos Muhammad: Community Policing In Baltimore & The Nation Of Islam

Photo Credit: Lisa MuhammadMay 17, 2016 – Segment 3

We talk with Minister Carlos Muhammad about Community Policing in Baltimore. Minister Carlos Muhammad is the Baltimore representative for Minister Louis Farrakhan and Student Minister for Muhammad Mosque Number 6 in Baltimore.


Remembering Father Dan Berrigan

Father dan Berrigan (Credit: Havana Times)May 13, 2016 – Segment 4

We host a special remembrance of Father Daniel Berrigan who died last week. With: Brendan Walsh, co-founder of Viva House; and Liz McAlister, co-founder of Jonah House.


The World That Brought Us Freddie Gray: Episode 2 – Policing & Police-Community Relations

Baltimore PoliceMay 10, 2016 – Segment 1

We begin the show with Episode 2 of The World That Brought Us Freddie Gray, a 5-part radio documentary produced by students at the University of Maryland Baltimore County in collaboration with the UMBC American Studies Department, Baltimore Traces, and the Center for Emerging Media. During the past semester as part of the UMBC American Studies Class “Radio In American Culture” taught by Steiner Show producer Stefanie Mavronis and myself, students have worked to produce a series highlighting the voices of residents of Baltimore City who have all in one way or another been affected by the death of Freddie Gray and the Uprising that followed.

Episode 2 on Policing and Police-Community Relations features the voices of civil rights layer A Dwight Pettit, Law Enforcement Against Prohibition’s Neill Franklin, Communities United’s John Comer, Gilmor Homes resident Tyesha Harrell, McCulloh Homes resident Rochelle Barksdale, former Baltimore police officer Michael A. Wood Jr., and The Real News’ Eddie Conway.

Production, research, editing, and voice work for today’s segment on Policing and Police-Community Relations was done by: Jeremy Mosier, Charlie Klontz, Laura Osborne, and Bryan Hargraves with executive production assistance by Marc Steiner, Stefanie Mavronis and Adam Droneburg.


The World That Brought Us Freddie Gray: Part 4 – Housing

Baltimore Housing (Credit: ujreview.com)May 12, 2016 – Segment 1

We host Part 4 of The World That Brought Us Freddie Gray, a 5-part radio documentary produced by students at the University of Maryland Baltimore County, a collaboration between the students, the UMBC American Studies Department, Baltimore Traces, and the Center for Emerging Media. During the past semester as part of the UMBC American Studies Class “Radio In American Culture” taught by Steiner Show producer Stefanie Mavronis and myself, students have worked to produce a series highlighting the voices of residents of Baltimore City who have all in one way or another been affected by the death of Freddie Gray and the Uprising that followed. Today’s episode focuses on Housing.

Episode 4 on Housing features the voices of Rochelle Barksdale of McCulloh Homes, Tyesha Williams of Gilmor Homes, homeless persons’ and housing advocate Jeff Singer, and Communities United’s John Comer.

Production, research, editing, and voice work for today’s segment on Education was done by: Dalton Maize, Kamilla Keldiyarova, Navaal Mahdi, and James Harris.


Rebroadcast: Voices From the Freddie Gray Protests

Baltimore Uprising (Credit: BaltimoreSun)May 6, 2016 – Segment 3

We continue with Baltimore Uprising, One Year Later, with a rebroadcast of a piece we produced a year ago, Voices from the Freddie Gray Protests, featuring the voices of people at protests during the Uprising. You will hear from: Nyasha Dixon, Ralikh Hayes, Paul Rucker, Willa Bickham, Brendan Walsh, Rev. Dr. Heber Brown III, Molly Amster, Minister Carlos Muhammad, Dayvon Love, Dr. Lawrence Brown, Cordy Shaw, Person Ablach, students from Goucher, Councilpersons Carl Stokes, Nick Mosby, Brandon M. Scott and more.


Jean Albert Renaud on the Lead Up to the 1968 Riots

JARMay 5, 2016 – Segment 2

We continue our feature Baltimore Uprising: One Year Later, as Steiner Show producer Mark Gunnery interviews Jean Albert Renaud in a conversation about the lead up to the 1968 Baltimore riots. Renaud is a former Motown artist, horseman, wild Mustang rancher, and founder of Protect Yourself 1 and Project Arrowhead, two programs for at-risk youth.


Remembering Fr. Daniel Berrigan

berriganMay 2, 2016 – Segment 1

We begin the show with a brief reflection on the life of poet and activist Fr. Daniel J. Berrigan, who died on Saturday at the age of 94. Berrigan was one of the “Catonsville Nine” and a leader of the anti-Vietnam War movement.


Against All Odds: Voices of Popular Struggle In Iraq

Tale Of Two Cities (Credit: Tadween Publishing)April 29, 2016 – Segment 3

We have a conversation with Ali Issa, national field organizer for War Resisters League, about his book “Against All Odds: Voices of Popular Struggle in Iraq.”


A Tale of Two Cities: Examining West Baltimore Then & Now In The Context Of Last April’s Uprising

Tale of Two cities (Credit: Baltimore Magazine)April 29, 2016 – Segment 2

We talk with Ron Cassie, Senior Editor of Baltimore Magazine, about his in-depth and thought-provoking article “A Tale of Two Cities: For half a century, West Baltimore was a vital center of black culture, mixed-income neighborhoods, and groundbreaking civil rights activism. After Freddie Gray, can it be again?”


Baltimore Uprising One Year Later

Baltimore Uprising (Credit: Salon Magazine)April 27, 2016 – Segment 3

We host the most recent episode of Baltimore Uprising, One Year Later. With: Malaika Aminata Clements, Morgan State University Print Journalism graduate and Director of Not About a Riot; Ericka Alston, Director of Business Development for Penn North and Founding Director of Kids Safe Zone; and Dr. Karsonya “Kaye” Whitehead, Assistant Professor of Communication and Affiliate Assistant Professor of African and African American Studies at Loyola University Maryland, and author of Race Brave: New and Selected WorksNotes From a Colored Girl: The Civil War Pocket Diaries of Emile Frances Davis and My Black Sons: Raising Boys in a Post-Racial America.


Remembering Prince

Prince (Credit: Playbuzz)April 26, 2016 – Segment 1

We host a special hour-long tribute to Prince, who died last week at the age of 57. With: Carla Wills, Senior News Producer at Democracy Now!Kalima Young, instructor at Towson University and University of Maryland College Park; Dr. Lester Spence, Center for Emerging Media Scholar-In-Residence, Associate Professor of Political Science and Africana Studies at Johns Hopkins University, and author of Knocking the Hustle: Against the Neoliberal Turn in Black Politics, and Stare in the Darkness: The Limits of Hip-hop and Black Politics; and Steve Parke, Baltimore photographer who was Prince’s art director for nearly 15 years.


Rebroadcast: Symbols Of The Confederacy

Confederate Statue Vandalism (Credit: CBS News)April 13, 2016 – Segment 2

We host a rebroadcast of “Symbols of the Confederacy,” about Baltimore’s statuary honoring the Confederacy. In January the Baltimore Special Commission that reviewed the city’s Confederate monuments recommended that the Roger Taney Monument on Mount Vernon Place and the Robert E. Lee and “Stonewall” Jackson Monument in the Wyman Park Dell – 2 out of 4 Confederate monuments in Baltimore – be removed.

Our panel of guests includes: Zoë CarpenterThe Nation‘s Assistant Washington Editor, who wrote a blog post “A History of Hate Rock From Johnny Rebel to Dylann Roof;” Yoni Appelbaum, a senior editor at The Atlantic, where he oversees the Politics section and wrote an article titled “Why Is The Flag Still There;” Chris Roberts, advocate and a doctoral student and instructor in the African American Studies Department at Temple University; Dr. Tara Bynum, post-doctoral fellow at Rutgers University; and Evan Serpick, former Editor of the City Paper, who wrote the article “Stop Honoring White Supremacy” and started an online petition to change the name of Robert E. Lee Park.


Understanding Jim Crow: Using Racist Memorabilia to Teach Tolerance and Promote Social Justice.

Understanding Jim Crow (Credit: Amazon)April 13, 2016 – Segment 2

We host a conversation with Dr. David Pilgrim. He is a professor, orator, and human rights activist best known as the founder and curator of the Jim Crow Museum — a ten-thousand-piece collection of racist artifacts located at Ferris State University in Michigan, which uses objects of intolerance to teach about race, race relations, and racism. We talk about his book Understanding Jim Crow: Using Racist Memorabilia to Teach Tolerance and Promote Social Justice.


Baltimore Uprising, One Year Later: Paul Rucker on History, Art, and the Uprising

Baltimore Uprising Art (Credit: YesMagazine)April 8th, 2016 – Segment 2

We play a  segment of our project: Baltimore Uprising, One Year Later, we talk with cellist, artist, and Baker Artist Award recipient Paul Rucker about history, art, and the Uprising.


Baltimore Uprising, One Year Later: Kim Chase On Growing Up In West Baltimore

Kim ChaseApril 7, 2016 – Segment 1

We begin the show with the next installment of our series Baltimore Uprising, One Year Later. We look back at the 1968 unrest in Baltimore following the death of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. With: Kim Chase, Business Manager for WEAA.

Baltimore Uprising, One Year Later: 1968 and 2015

Voices Of The Freddie Gray ProtestApril 6, 2016 – Segment 2

As part of our series this month, Baltimore Uprising, One Year Later, our guests consider both the 1968 unrest and the 2015 uprising.  With: The Rev. Dr. Heber Brown, Pastor of Pleasant Hope Baptist Church and Executive Director of Orita’s Cross Freedom School; Lady Brion, spoken word artist and Baltimore’s Grand Slam Champion, Resident Poet for Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle, and Program Manager for Dewmore Baltimore; Avon Bellamy, Sr., poet, writer and activist; and Dr. Robert Birt, author of The Liberatory Thought of Martin Luther King Jr.: Critical Essays on the Philosopher King, and Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Bowie State University.

Baltimore Uprising, One Year Later: Looking Back at 1968

riotApril 5, 2016 – Segment 5

It’s our latest installment of our month-long series, Baltimore Uprising, One Year Later. Today’s installment is called Looking Back at 1968. With guest host Mark Gunnery, producer for The Marc Steiner Show, who interviews Dr. Robert Birt, author of The Liberatory Thought of Martin Luther King Jr.: Critical Essays on the Philosopher King, and Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Bowie State University.


The Comparison & Contrast of MLK and The Baltimore Uprising

17083894938_8d818e19c2_nApril 4, 2016 – Segment 2

Marc reflects upon, contrast and compare the 1968 Baltimore riots following the death of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and the 2015 Baltimore Uprising. With: Dominique Stevenson, Program Director for the American Friends Service Committee and co-author of Marshall Law: The Life and Times of a Baltimore Black Panther; and Marshall “Eddie” Conway, Producer at the Real News Network‘s Baltimore Bureau, former Baltimore Black Panther leader and political prisoner, and co-author of Marshall Law: The Life and Times of a Baltimore Black Panther.


The Social Life of DNA: Race, Reparations, and Reconciliation After the Genome

Dr. Alondra NelsonMarch 31, 2016 – Segment 1

We rebroadcast a fascinating discussion held earlier this year with Dr. Alondra Nelson, Professor of Sociology and Dean of Social Science at Columbia University, where she has served as Director of the Institute for Research on Women, Gender, and Sexuality. Dr. Nelson talks about her book The Social Life of DNA: Race, Reparations, and Reconciliation After the Genome. She also authored Body and Soul: The Black Panther Party and the Fight Against Medical Discrimination.


Tengella’s Take: Who Created the Beat in Beatbox?!

Koli TengellaApril 1, 2016 – Segment 1

We host our weekly feature Tengella’s Take with Koli Tengella. Koli is President of Tengella Edutainment, an instructor and creator of the Positive Social Change Performing Arts Program at Augusta Fells Savage Institute of Visual Arts High School, and he was a 2010 Open Society Institute Fellow.


Legalize It All: How To Win The War On Drugs

Dan Baum (Credit: Dan Baum website)March 28, 2016 – Segment 1

We host a conversation with with author Dan Baum, about his current front page article in Harper’s magazine, Legalize It All: How to win the war on drugs, which discusses how the Nixon administration’s “War on Drugs” was started to attack Black people and the anti-war left.

Baum has been a staff writer for The New Yorker, as well as a reporter for The Wall Street Journal, The Asian Wall Street Journal, and The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. His books include: Smoke and Mirrors: The War on Drugs and the Politics of Failure and Gun Guys: A Road Trip with author Dan Baum, about his current front page article in Harper’s magazine, Legalize It All: How to win the war on drugs, which discusses how the Nixon administration’s “War on Drugs” was started to attack Black people and the anti-war left. Baum has been a staff writer for The New Yorker, as well as a reporter for The Wall Street JournalThe Asian Wall Street Journal, and The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. His books include: Smoke and Mirrors: The War on Drugs and the Politics of Failure and Gun Guys: A Road Trip.with author Dan Baum, about his current front page article in Harper’s magazine, Legalize It All: How to win the war on drugs, which discusses how the Nixon administration’s “War on Drugs” was started to attack Black people and the anti-war left. Baum has been a staff writer for The New Yorker, as well as a reporter for The Wall Street Journal, The Asian Wall Street Journal, and The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. His books include: Smoke and Mirrors: The War on Drugs and the Politics of Failure and Gun Guys: A Road Trip.


Panther Baby: A Life of Rebellion & Reinvention

Jamal JosephMarch 11, 2016 – Segment 4

In an archive edition of the Steiner Show, we hear an interview with Jamal Joseph, activist, urban guerrilla, FBI’s most wanted fugitive, poet, and filmmaker, who joined us to discuss his memoir, Panther Baby: A Life of Rebellion & Reinvention. He is currently chair of Columbia’s School of the Arts film division.


From The Archives: Philipp Meyer’s ‘American Rust’

American RustFebruary 19, 2016 – Segment 3

We listen back to a special archive edition of The Marc Steiner Show, when I spoke with Baltimore native Philipp Meyer about his novel American Rust, a story set in a small, former steel town in western Pennsylvania, that explores how people’s lives change when stable, middle-class jobs disappear from the place they call home.

The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution

black panthersFebruary 16, 2016 – Segment 3

We have a preview of the new documentary Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution, which premieres Tuesday, February 16 on PBS. With: Stanley Nelson, award-winning filmmaker, founder of Half Nelson Productions and Director of Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution; and Paul Coates, former Baltimore Black Panther and founder of Black Classic Press.
Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution will be screened tomorrowevening, February 16, at 6:00 pm at the Catonsville Branch of the Baltimore County Public Library. 

David Pilgrim On Understanding Jim Crow: Using Racist Memorabilia To Teach Tolerance

David Pilgrim (Credit: Salon)February 5, 2016 – Segment 2

We have a conversation with Dr. David Pilgrim. He is a professor, orator, and human rights activist best known as the founder and curator of the Jim Crow Museum — a ten-thousand-piece collection of racist artifacts located at Ferris State University, which uses objects of intolerance to teach about race, race relations, and racism.We speak to him about his book Understanding Jim Crow: Using Racist Memorabilia to Teach Tolerance and Promote Social Justice.


Charles Johnson & Ethelbert Miller: On Martin Luther King, Jr.

Charles JohnsonJanuary 21, 2016 – Segment 1

We begin the show with a conversation with two of our great writers and thinkers, Charles Johnson and E. Ethelbert Miller, about Johnson’s powerful and insightful book The Words and Wisdom of Charles Johnson. Novelist and scholar Charles Johnson is a National Book Award-winning author whose works include Middle Passage; and poet E. Ethelbert Miller is a literary activist and Board Chairperson of the Institute for Policy Studies.


2-Hour Special: The Relevance of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. In Today’s World

MLK Jr. (Credit: Biography.com)January 18, 2015 – Two Hour Special

In honor of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, we feature a special 2-hour conversation on the Rev. Dr. King’s relevancy to this moment: From the 2016 election to community organizing in Baltimore.
Our first panel of guests includes: Dedrick Muhammad, Director of the Racial Wealth Divide Initiative of CFED; Dorcas Gilmore, attorney and consultant focused on community economic development and race equity issues; and Charly Carter, Director of Maryland Working Families.
On our second panel of guests we feature: Makayla Gilliam-Price, Founder of City Bloc and Assata’s Syllabus; Betty Robinson, former member of SNCC and member of Baltimore Standing Up For Racial Justice; Molly Amster of Jews United for Justice; and John Comer, Lead Organizer for Maryland Communities United.

From The Archives: Symbols of the Confederacy

Confederacy Counter Protest (Credit: City Paper)January 15, 2015 – Segment 3

We rebroadcast this conversation in light of the Baltimore Special Commission that’s been reviewing the city’s Confederate monuments announcing their recommendation yesterday that the Roger Taney Monument on Mount Vernon Place and the Robert E. Lee and “Stonewall” Jackson Monument in the Wyman Park Dell — 2 out of 4 Confederate monuments in Baltimore — be removed. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake will have final say over that recommendation.
We are joined by Zoe Carpenter, The Nation‘s Assistant Washington Editor, who wrote a blog post “A History of Hate Rock From Johnny Rebel to Dylann Roof“; Yoni Appelbaum, a senior editor at The Atlantic, where he oversees the Politics section and wrote article titled “Why Is The Flag Still There“; Chris Roberts, advocate and a doctoral student and instructor in the African American Studies Department at Temple University; Dr. Tara Bynum, post-doctoral fellow at Rutgers University; and Evan Serpick, former Editor of the City Paper, wrote the article “Stop Honoring White Supremacy” and started an online petition to change the name of Robert E. Lee Park.

Capitol Men: The Epic Story of Reconstruction Through the Lives of the First Black Congressmen

capitolJanuary 8, 2016 – Segment 3

In a special archive edition of The Marc Steiner Show, we talk with award-winning author Philip Dray about his book Capitol Men: The Epic Story of Reconstruction Through the Lives of the First Black Congressmen. Dray’s works include novels such as Stealing God’s Thunder and At the Hands of Persons Unknown, which won the Robert F. Kennedy Book Award and the Southern Book Critics Circle Award.


Baltimore Traces: Communities In Transition – Part 3: Changes

Bromo Tower (Credit: baltimore.com)December 9, 2015 – Segment 1

We host the third segment of a series of productions by students in the American Studies Program at University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC), called Baltimore Traces: Communities in Transition.


Baltimore Traces: Communities in Transition – Part 1: History

Bromo Arts District (Credit: Bromo Arts District Website) December 7, 2015 – Segment 1

We host a production by students in the American Studies Program at University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC), called Baltimore Traces: Communities in Transition – Part 1.

During the past semester, students have worked on the Bromo Speaks project to produce a radio series featuring the voices of the residents, artists, workers, and business owners in Baltimore’s Bromo Tower Arts & Entertainment District. The students gathered over 40 interviews with various people living, working, and visiting the district, highlighting themes such as: history, neighborhood change, racism and structural inequality, displacement and development, and the potential future of the area.


From The Archives: The Rebellious Life Of Mrs. Rosa Parks

The Rebellious Life of Mrs Rosa Parks. (Credit: PBS)December 4, 2015 – Segment 6

We host a special archive edition of The Marc Steiner Show. December 1st marked the 60th anniversary of the beginning of the Montgomery Bus Boycott, so to commemorate that date we talk with Dr. Jeanne Theoharis about her book The Rebellious Life of Mrs Rosa Parks.


150th Anniversary Of The Ratification Of The 13th Amendment Ending Slavery

13th AmendmentDecember 3, 2015 – Segment 2

On December 6, 1865 the 13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, officially ending the institution of slavery, was ratified. “Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.” With these words, the single greatest change bought about from the Civil War was officially noted in the Constitution. The ratification came eight months after the end of the war, but it represented the culmination of a long struggle against slavery.

Joining guest host Dr. Kaye Whitehead to talk to us about these changes and about how far we need to go are: Dr. Joycelyn Moody, Sue E. Denman Distinguished Chair in American Literature at the University of Texas at San Antonio, where she teaches and researches 19th-century African American literature; and Dr. Treva Lindsey, Assistant Professor in the Department of Women’s Gender and Sexuality Studies at Ohio State University.


Dispatches From Africa and the Diaspora

November 20, 2015 – Segment 3

We present our newest Center for Emerging Media production, Dispatches from Africa and the Diaspora.  The monthly feature will focus on news and trends from around Africa and the Diaspora.  In our inaugural episode we explore what the Diaspora really is, where it started, and pan-ethnic relationships in the black community.  With: Dr. Raymond Winbush, research professor and Director of the Institute for Urban Research at Morgan State University and author of Belinda’s Petition: A Concise History of Reparations for the Transatlantic Slave Trade; Dr. Stephanie Shonekan, Associate Professor of Ethnomusicology and Black Studies at the University of Missouri and author of The Life of Camilla Williams, African American Classical Singer and Opera Diva; Nia Hampton, writer, journalist, filmmaker and playwright, whose recent op-alt “Todos Somos Iguais” in the City Paper detailed her experiences in Bahia, Brazil during the Baltimore Uprising; and Dr. Lester Space, Center for Emerging Media Scholar-in-Residence, Associate Professor of Political Science and Africana Studies at Johns Hopkins University, and author of a number of books including Knocking the Hustle: Against the Neoliberal Turn in Black Politics. 


Not About A Riot: Stories of Hope, Resilience, and Community

Not About a Riot (Credit: EMP Collective)November 18, 2015 – Segment 3

We take a look at an exciting new film premiering this Sunday, November 22, at 7:00pm at the EMP CollectiveNot About a Riot tells the stories of the Baltimore Uprising that media didn’t cover – stories of hope, resilience, and community.

With: Malaika Aminata Clements, Morgan State University Print Journalism graduate and Director of Not About a Riot; and Nia Hampton, writer and filmmaker.


Hartford County, Maryland Cross Burnings

November 3, 2015 – Segment 2Screen Shot 2015-11-04 at 12.37.30 AM

Next we turn our focus to recent reports of cross burnings in Harford County, Maryland. Marc is joined by Gina Pierleoni, concerned resident of Bel Air, Maryland, mixed media artist, and adjunct Painting and Drawing Professor at Harford Community College.


What Fanon Said: A Philosophical Introduction To His Life And Thought

Frantz FanonOctober 30, 2015 – Segment 3

We close the show with a conversation with internationally renowned interpreter of Franz Fanon’s works, Lewis R. Gordon about his latest book What Fanon Said: A Philosophical Introduction To His Life And Thought.


Guns in Society: Gun Control, Self Defense and Civil Rights

October 27, 2015 – Segment 2

We conclude today’s show by revisiting a Philosopher’s Roundtable from July 2015, which focused on the debate taking place around gun control, calls for self defense in light of the June 17th Shooting of 9 worshipers in a church in Charleston, South Carolina; and the role of guns in the civil rights movement. With: Firmin DeBrabander, Professor of Philosophy at the Maryland Institute College of Art and author of Do Guns Make us Free: Democracy and the Armed SocietyCharlie Cobb, author ofThis Nonviolent Stuff’ll Get You Killed: How Guns Made the Civil Rights Movement Possible; and Dante Barry, Executive Director of the Million Hoodies March for Justice.


Interview with 2015 MacArthur “Genius” Award Winner, Ta-Nehisi Coates

October 20, 2015 – Segment 2

We listen to an encore presentation with Marc’s interview with 2015 MacArthur “Genius” Award Winner Ta-Nehisi Coates, national correspondent for The Atlantic and author of Between the World and Me and The Beautiful Struggle.

This week is the WEAA Fall Membership Drive, so tune in for compelling topics and wonderful premiums! Now is your opportunity to support the station you have come to love: WEAA, THE Voice of the Community. Call 410-319-8888 or visit weaa.org to make your pledge of support during the show.

Segment originally aired July 22, 2015. 


The Cold Cases Of The Jim Crow Era

October 16, 2015 – Segment 2JCrowcoldcase

Marc speaks with Margaret Russell, Law Professor at Santa Clara University, about her opinion piece “The Cold Cases of the Jim Crow Era”  which ran in the New York Times last August.  Russel sheds light on the unresolved cases of the hundreds of “disappeared”  Black men, women and children who were abducted and murdered during the height of the Jim Crow Era between 1930 – 1960.


Justice or Else: Reflections on the 20th Anniversary of the Million Man March

October 13, 2015 – Segment 3Justice_OR_Else_255x360

Our panel reflects on the Million Man March 2o years on, and the role of the millennials in the modern movement.

Our panel of guests:  Malaika Aminata Clements, Morgan State University Print Journalism graduate and freelance life experiencer; Meshelle the Indie Mom of Comedy, former Open Society Institute-Baltimore Community Fellow and Founder of Goaldiggers, the Sankofa Project; Farajii Muhammad, Host of Listen Up! on WEAA 88.9-FM and member of the Nation of Islam; and Minister Carlos Muhammad, Baltimore representative for Minister Louis Farrakhan and Student Minister for Muhammad Mosque Number 6 in Baltimore.


Gyasi Ross On The Movement To Rename Columbus Day

Columbus Day (Credit: Flickr - Vanessa)October 12, 2015 – Segment 2

Since Monday, October 12 2015, is the federal holiday named for Christopher Columbus, in our show we acknowledge the effort to rename the day Indigenous People’s Day. With: writer and attorney Gyasi Ross, member of the Blackfeet Tribe and author of How To Say I Love You In Indian.


Everyman Theatre’s World of the Play: The Inspector’s Role

October 9, 2015 – Segment 3world of the play

In the latest installment of the our World of the Play series,  brought to you in partnership with the Everyman Theatre, Marc is joined by panelists in a thought provoking conversation based on the current production of J.B. Priestley’s psychological thriller, An Inspector Calls.   The play reflects issues of class, collective responsibility and gender dynamics. Our panel of guests includes: playwright, author and award-winning producer Michael Olmert, Professor of Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 18th Century Studies, and Modern British Drama at the University of Maryland; Robyn Quick, Chair of the Department of Theatre Arts at Towson University where she is Professor of Theatre History and Dramaturgy; and visual artist, composer, and musician Paul Rucker, whose exhibition Rewind is currently at the Baltimore Museum of Art.


Remembering Activist & Civil Rights Pioneer Grace Lee Boggs (1915-2015)

Grace Lee Boggs (Photo Credit: Kyle McDonald on Flickr)October 6, 2015 – Segment 1

Activist, civil rights pioneer, writer, and public intellectual Grace Lee Boggs passed yesterday morning at the age of 100, at her home in Detroit. We begin our show with a remembrance and tribute to this remarkable woman. With: Sine Hwang Jensen, Asian American Studies Librarian at the Ethnic Studies Library at UC Berkeley; and adrienne maree brown, co-editor of Octavia’s Brood, sci-fi writer, and Emergent Strategy facilitator.


Black Patriots and Loyalists: Fighting for Emancipation in the War for Independence

gilbertOctober 2, 2015 – Segment 4

In a special archive edition of the Marc Steiner Show, author Alan Gilbert joins us to talk about his fascinating book Black Patriots and Loyalists: Fighting for Emancipation in the War for Independence. The book details the struggle of African Americans to gain freedom during the Revolutionary War. Gilbert is John Evans Professor in the Josef Korbel School of International Studies at the University of Denve


Sir Hilary Beckles, CARICOM Reparations Chairman, On Slavery & Britain’s Black Debt

Britain's Black Debt (Photo Credit: The University of the West Indies Press)September 24, 2015 – Segment 1

We start with a conversation about slavery, reparations, and the Caribbean with Sir Hilary Beckles, Vice-Chancellor of the University of the West Indies, Chairman of the CARICOM Reparations Commission and author of Britain’s Black Debt: Reparations for Caribbean Slavery and Native Genocide.

 


The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution

The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the RevolutionSeptember 16, 2015 – Segment 3

We talk with filmmaker Stanley Nelson about his important new documentary The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolutionwhich examines the rise of the Black Panther Party in the 1960s and its impact on civil rights and American culture.


Ta-Nehisi Coates: The Black Family in the Age of Mass Incarceration

Ta-Nehisi Coates (Photo Credit: The Atlantic)September 16, 2015 – Segment 1

We host a live interview with Ta-Nehisi Coates, national correspondent for The Atlantic and author of Between the World and Me and The Beautiful Struggle, who joins us to discuss his recent article for The Atlantic, “The Black Family in the Age of Mass Incarceration.”


David Simon & Bill Zorzi On ‘Show Me A Hero’

Photo Credit: HBO.comSeptember 4, 2015 – Segment 2

Did you watch the 6-part HBO miniseries Show Me A Hero? Even if you didn’t, you will want to hear my interview with the series’ co-writers David Simon and Bill Zorzi. Writer and journalist David Simon is a former Baltimore Sun reporter and creator of The Wire; journalist and screenwriter Bill Zorzi is a former Baltimore Sunreporter and wrote for The Wire.


The Black Lives Matter Movement & The Civil Rights Movement

Photo Credit: russell howze via FlickrSeptember 2, 2015 – Segment 1

We begin our show with a discussion about the Black Lives Matter movement and the Civil Rights Movement: differences, tensions, and connections. Our panel of guests will be responding in part to an op-ed in the Washington Post last week, written by Civil Rights activist Barbara Reynolds, “I was a civil rights activist in the 1960s. But it’s hard for me to get behind Black Lives Matter.”

Our panel will include: Kalima Young, Director of the Baltimore Art + Justice Project, a project of the Office of Community Engagement at the Maryland Institute College of Art; the Rev. Dr. Heber Brown, Pastor of Pleasant Hope Baptist Church and Executive Director of Orita’s Cross Freedom School; and John Milton Wesley, author, songwriter, and Senior Fellow in Social Marketing with the National Center for Health Behavioral Change at Morgan State University.


Reflecting On The 10 Years Since Hurricane Katrina

"Honoring Those Still Missing" (Photo Credit: Craig Morse via Flickr)August 28, 2015 – Segment 2

Listen to a special Marc Steiner Show / Center for Emerging Media presentation: 10 Years Since Hurricane Katrina. You will hear the diverse voices of a number of individuals from and/or living in the Crescent City, most of whom lived through the storm.

With: Tracie Washington, President of Louisiana Justice Institute; James Perry, New Orleanian and former Director of the Greater New Orleans Fair Housing Action Center; Jordan Flaherty, New Orleans-based journalist, author of the book Floodlines: Community and Resistance from Katrina to the Jena Six, and creator of the new short documentary film New Orleans: Recovery or Removal (which can be seen at GRITTV.org); Kristina Kay Robinson, writer, artist, and New Orleans native; Karen Gadbois, founder and reporter at The Lens, New Orleans’ first investigative news non-profit; Adam Karlin, freelance journalist and travel writer in New Orleans; Ellis Marsalis III, photographer and native New Orleanian; Tara Conley, Social Media Manager at Race Forward, Producer of Kellen and Katrina, and Brackish: A Visual Ethnography of Hurricane Katrina; and Kellen, musician and subject of the film Kellen and Katrina


From The Archives: Martha Cooper On Documenting The Birth Of Hip-Hop Culture

Martha CooperAugust 21, 2015 – Segment 4

We close out the show with a special archive edition of The Marc Steiner Show as we listen back to my 2010 interview with photographer Martha Cooper, best known for documenting the birth of hip hop culture in New York City in the 1970’s and early 80’s.


Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz: Continuing The Conversation On ‘An Indigenous People’s History Of The US’

An Indigenous People's History of the USAugust 21, 2015 – Segment 3

I talk with Native American author, historian, feminist, and self-described revolutionary Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, whose seminal book An Indigenous People’s History of the United States was just released in paperback.


Remembering Longtime Civil Rights Leader Julian Bond & The Critical Years Of The Civil Rights Movement

**FILE** This July 8, 2007 file photo shows NAACP Chairman Julian Bond addressing the civil rights organization's annual convention in Detroit. Bond says he will not seek re-election as chairman, a post he has held since 1998. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya, file)August 20, 2015 – Segment 1

Our guest host for the first hour is Dr. Lawrence Brown, public health consultant and Assistant Professor of Public Health in the School of Community Health and Policy at Morgan State University. We begin the show by remembering longtime Civil Rights leader Julian Bond, who died Sunday, and looking back at 1965 and 1966, which were critical years of the movement.

The panel of guests includes: Betty Robinson, former member of SNCC, co-editor of Hands on the Freedom Plow: Personal Accounts of Women in SNCC, and 2003 Open Society Institute Community Fellow; and Judy Richardson, former member of SNCC, filmmaker who worked on Eyes on the Prize, co-editor of Hands on the Freedom Plow: Personal Accounts by Women in SNCC, and board member of the SNCC Legacy Committee.


Philosopher’s Roundtable: Exploring Institutional Racism

jimAugust 11, 2015 – Segment 3

It’s another Philosopher’s Roundtable, on Defining and Exploring Institutional Racism. “Institutional racism” is a term often used but not often clearly defined. We look at its definition and historical roots, especially as they relate to today.

Our panel of guests includes: A. Adar Ayira, Project Manager of the More in the Middle Initiative at Associated Black Charities and facilitator and analyst at Baltimore Racial Justice Action, a program of Fusion Partnerships; Doug Colbert,University of Maryland Law School professor and co-chair of the Society of American Law Teachers’ (SALT) Access to Justice Curriculum Project; Michael Higginbotham, Wilson H. Elkins Professor of Law at the University of Baltimore, and author of Ghosts of Jim Crow: Ending Racism in “Post-Racial” America; and freelance media maker Maegan La Mala Ortiz.


Taylor Branch’s ‘America In the King Years’

taylorAugust 11, 2015 – Segment 1

We begin the show with a rebroadcast of Marc’s interview with Pulitzer Prize-winning author and historian Taylor Branch, whose trilogy America in the King Years chronicles the life of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and the Civil Rights Movement.

 

 

 


The Quilters Of Gee’s Bend, Alabama

quiltsAugust 7, 2015 – Segment 2

We have a special 2007 archive edition of The Marc Steiner Show: The Quilters of Gee’s Bend, Alabama.  With: Louisiana Bendolph and Mary Lee Bendolph, two of the quilters from Gee’s Bend; and Linda Day Clark, photographer who has photographed Gee’s Bend.


Poverty Since the Civil Rights Movement

baltimorepovertyAugust 5, 2015 – Segment 2

In an archive presentation that is relevant for today, we examine why poverty has continued to grow in cities since the Civil Rights Movement. Harvard sociologist William Julius Wilson spent over twenty years trying to determine why the poverty and desperation in America’s inner cities has grown since the height of the Civil Rights Movement. He discussed his book More Than Just Race: Being Black and Poor in the Inner City, which examines the factors contributing to this grim statistic.


Guests of the Ayatollah: The First Battle in America’s War with Militant Islam

iran_hostagesAugust 4, 2015 – Segment 3

We hear a special archive edition of the show, as Marc talks with Mark Bowden, author of many books including Black Hawk Down, about his 2006 work Guests of the Ayatollah: The First Battle in America’s War with Militant Islam.


Mencken: The American Iconoclast

H.L.-MenckenAugust 3, 2015 – Segment 3

We have a conversation about Baltimore icon H.L. Mencken. Author Marion Elizabeth Rodgers joins us to talk about her book Mencken: The American Iconoclast.


Scarred Justice: The Orangeburg Massacre of 1968

orangeburgAugust 3, 2015 – Segment 2

We feature a special 2009 archive edition of the Steiner Show, Scarred Justice: The Orangeburg Massacre of 1968. Marc speaks with Judy Richardson, director of a chilling documentary by that same name, about the 1968 massacre of black students at South Carolina State University.

 


Beyond Swastika and Jim Crow: Jewish Refugee Scholars at Black Colleges

Ernst_Borinski1955July 31, 2015 – Segment 5

We hear a special archive edition of The Marc Steiner Show, where we explore a surprising alliance, during World War II, when many Jewish professors fled from Nazi Germany and were offered positions at historically black colleges. We discuss the intertwined history of African Americans and Jews with the curators of Beyond Swastika and Jim Crow: Jewish Refugee Scholars at Black Colleges, which was an exhibit at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum.

We hear from: John Milton Wesley, student of Jewish refugee scholar Dr. Ernst Borinski; Dr. Michelle Joan Wilkinson, Director of Collections and Exhibitions at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum; and Anita Kassof, Assistant Director at the Jewish Museum of Maryland.


July 31: This Day in History

whitneyyoungJuly 31, 2015 – Segment 1

On this day in history, Muslims conquered Iberia and Whitney Young of the Urban League was born.

Transcript of This Day in History Included Below

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July 30: This Day in History

mingusJuly 30, 2015 – Segment 1

Marc talks about what happened on this day in history, including the day the city of Baltimore was founded, the day President Lincoln issued an “eye-for-eye” order to shoot a rebel prisoner for every black prisoner shot, and the day Charles Mingus recorded his solo Piano Album ‘Mingus Plays Piano’.

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July 29: This Day in History

Mill_Children_1903July 29, 2015 – Segment 1

On this day in history, radical union leader Mother Jones led a march of mill children to the doorstep of President Theodore Roosevelt’s summer home in Oyster Bay, New York to expose conditions that children as young as 4 or 5 experienced working in sweatshops.

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July 28: This Day in History

bachJuly 28, 2015 – Segment 1

On this day in history, Johann Sebastian Bach died and the 14th Amendment of the US Constitution was ratified today.

Transcript of this day in history included below.

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July 27: This Day In History

Osborne Perry AndersonJuly 27, 2015 – Segment 1

Today in history, Red Summer began in Chicago with whites attacking black people and their communities, the man who escaped John Brown’s raid Osborne Perry Anderson was born, and the first permanent telegraph cable was finished from Ireland to Newfoundland.

Transcript of this day in history included below.

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July 24: This Day In History

Ladybug MeccaJuly 24, 2015 – Segment 1

Today in history, Ladybug Mecca of Digable Planets was born, Red Summer violence reached Washington DC, and the Scottsboro Boys were convicted of rapes they did not convict.

Transcript of this day in history included below.

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July 23: This Day In History

The Detroit RiotsJuly 23, 2015  – Segment 1

Today in history, Ethiopian Emperor Haile Selassie was born, the Eastern Cherokee Council held a meeting in discuss President Jackson’s proposal to turn their lands into what is now called Oklahoma, and one of the deadliest riots in US history broke out on 12th Street in Detroit.

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July 22: This Day In History

James Earl JonesJuly 22, 2015 – Segment 1

Today in history, actor James Earl Jones received the National Medal of Arts, Palestinian cartoonist Naji Salim al-Ali was shot and killed in London, and the great George Clinton was born.

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July 21: This Day in History

yusuf-islam_refJuly 21, 2015 – Segment 1

On this day in history, the National Association of Colored Women’s Clubs was founded and Yusuf Islam, formerly known as Cat Stevens, was born.

Transcript of day in history below

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July 20: This Day in History

carloJuly 20, 2015 – Segment 1

On this day in history, Frantz Fanon was born and Italian anarchist Carlo Giuliani was shot and killed by Italian military police during a protest in 2001.

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July 17: This Day In History

Bessie JonesJuly 17, 2015 – Segment 1

Today in history, folk songwriter Bessie Jones passed away, Joan of Arc was burned at the stake, and Port Chicago Mutiny took place in Chicago, California.

Transcript of this day in history included below.

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July 16: This Day in History

idaJuly 16, 2015 – Segment 1

On this day, the city of La Paz declared independence from Spain and Ida B. Wells was born.

Transcript of this day in history included below

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July 15: This Day In History

All Negro ComicsJuly 15, 2015 – Segment 1

Today in history, an 8-year-old Gladys Knight took first prize on Ted Mack’s Amateur Hour television show, Napoleon’s armies stumbled upon the Rosetta Stone, and The All Negro Comics were first published.

Transcript of this day in history included below.

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July 13: This Day In History

Frida KahloJuly 13, 2015 – Segment 1

Today in history, artist Frida Kahlo passed away, The Northwest Ordinance was signed laying the groundwork for the Westward expansion of the United States, and the New York Draft Riots broke out.

Transcript of this day in history included below.

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From The Archives: Ending Segregation & Fighting For Civil Rights In Cambridge, Maryland

Arrest in Cambridge, Maryland - 1963July 10, 2015 – Segment 5

We present a special archive edition of The Marc Steiner Show, commemorating the 52nd anniversary of the desegregation of Cambridge, Maryland. Residents Enez Stafford-Grubbs, Betty Jackson, and Francine Woolford joined us to share their memories of the struggle for civil rights, an end to segregation, and better living conditions in their hometown on the Eastern Shore of Maryland.


Tengella’s Take: Think Twice About Celebrating The 4th Of July

4th of JulyJuly 10, 2015 – Segment 2

It’s a new Tengella’s Take, our weekly feature when actor, educator, and activist Koli Tengella offers his thoughts on our world today. This week’s segment is on the 4th of July.  Koli is President of Tengella Edutainment, an instructor & creator of the Positive Social Change Theater/Performing Arts Program at Augusta Fells Savage Institute of Visual Arts High School, and was a 2010 Open Society Institute Fellow.


July 10: This Day in History

wilsonJuly 10, 2015 – Segment 1

On this day in history, Wilson Pickett released “In the Midnight Hour,” the Scopes Monkey Trial began, and London scientists traced human roots back to Africa.

This Day in History transcript included below.

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July 9: This Day In History

June JordanJuly 9, 2015 – Segment 1

Today in history, poet and essayist June Jordan was born in Harlem, the founder of the Congress of Racial Equality James Farmer passed away, and the Springhill Massacre occurred in Belfast, Northern Ireland.

Transcript of this day in history included below.

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July 8: This Day In History

Louis JordanJuly 8, 2015 – Segment 1

Today in history, songwriter and bandleader Louis Jordan was born, hundreds of white men attacked Hamburg, South Carolina, and mathematician Dr. David Henry Blackwell passed away.

Transcript of this day in history included below. 

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July 7: This Day in History

margaret walkerJuly 7, 2015 – Segment 1

On this day in history, poet and writer Margaret Walker was born and Toussaint L’Ouverture presented the new constitution declaring Haitian independence.

This Day in History transcript included below Read More→


July 6: This Day in History

ak47_3aJuly 6, 2015 – Segment 1

On this day in history, the Great Railway Strike of 1877 was started in Baltimore and the first AK-47 came off an assembly line in 1947.

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