The Marc Steiner Show

Sound Bites – Page 2

Sound Bites: Fracking | Phosphorous Management Tool | African Fried Rice

frackingMarch 10, 2015 – Segment 3

In our latest installment of our series about our food and our world, Sound Bites, we begin the hour with a debate on fracking in Maryland, with: Drew Cobbs, Executive Director, Maryland Petroleum Council; and Mike Tidwell, Founder and Director of the Chesapeake Climate Action Network, and author of The Ravaging Tide: Strange Weather, Future Katrinas and the Race to Save America’s Coastal Cities.

Then we hear an update on the Phosphorous Management Tool, in light of Maryland Governor Larry Hogan’s proposal to curb poultry manure runoff from Eastern Shore farms, with Maryland State Senator Paul Pinksy (Democrat-District 22), Vice Chair of the Education, Health, and Environmental Affairs Committee and sponsor of SB 0257, “Agriculture – Nutrient Management – Phosphorus Management Tool.”

We close out the show with a tasty treat, a recipe for African Fried Rice from Michael Twitty, Culinary Historian of African and African American Foodways and blogger at Afroculinaria.


Sound Bites: Radical Farmers Use Fresh Food to Fight Racial Injustice | Debating The Maryland Farmers’ Rights Act | Tribute To Juanita Ewell Of Cherry Hill Urban Garden

Juanita Ewell, Cherry Hill Urban GardenMarch 3, 2015 – Segment 3

On Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world, we begin the hour with a story from Yes! Magazine: Radical Farmers Use Fresh Food to Fight Racial Injustice and the New Jim Crow. With: Jalal Sabur, farmer and prison abolitionist, who helped to start the Freedom Food Alliance, a collective of farmers, political prisoners, and organizers in upstate New York committed to incorporating food justice to address racism in the criminal justice system; and Leah Penniman, farmer and educator based in the Albany, NY, area who wrote the article for YES!.

Then, our guests debate proposed legislation before the Maryland General Assembly, the Farmers’ Rights Act. With: Delegate Charles Otto (Republican, District 38A, Somerset & Worcester Counties), Deputy Minority Whip in the Maryland State House, and member of the House Environment and Transportation Committee and the House Natural Resources, Agriculture & Open Space Subcommittee; and Senator Richard Madaleno, Jr. (Democrat, District 18, Montgomery County), Vice-Chair of the Senate Budget and Taxation Committee, Chair of the Senate Health and Human Services Subcommittee, and primary sponsor of Senate Bill 0532, or the Farmers’ Rights Act.

We close out the show with a tribute to a local hero, Cherry Hill Urban Garden’s Juanita Ewell, who passed away on February 17th. From the Garden’s Facebook Page:

Juanita started the garden in 2010 with the mission of saving the community. She worked tirelessly to spread her love of gardening and healthy eating, and her energy and passion touched the hearts of so many. She will be dearly missed by her family, friends, and the entire Cherry Hill community.”

We remember this amazing person, an agent for change in her community, by listening back to an excerpt from our interview with her from last summer.


Sound Bites: Young Farmers In Baltimore City On Why They Farm & Their Communities | Finding The Best Matzoh Ball Soup

matzohFebruary 24, 2015 – Segment 3

In our latest edition of Sound Bites, we begin the show with a young farmers and food justice advocates roundtable. Our panel of guests includes: Walker Marsh, Founder & Owner, The Flower Factory; Isabel Antreasian, Project Manager for Whitelock Community Farm; Sache Jones, Food Justice Consultant for Park Heights Community Health Alliance and Manager of the AFYA Community Teaching Garden in Park Heights; and Charlotte Keniston, current Open Society Institute fellow working in partnership with Paul’s Place on community-led interventions to address food accessibility in the Pigtown neighborhood of Baltimore.

We close out with a segment based on an article from last week’s City Paper: The search for Baltimore’s best matzo ball soup begins and ends at home. With: Evan Serpick, Editor of the Baltimore City Paper; and Myra Serpick, retired social worker and mother of Evan Serpick, who alleges that she makes the best matzo ball soup in Baltimore.

 


Sound Bites: Fair Treatment For Farmworkers & The Human Cost Of Our Food Supply System

coalition immokalee workersFebruary 17, 2015 – Segment 4

On our series about our food and our world – Sound Bites – we bring you a tape of a panel discussion from last Thursday at Red Emma’s Bookstore and Café, which followed a screening of Food Chains, a documentary about the work of the Coalition of Immokalee Workers to achieve fair treatment for farmworkers. The film reveals the human cost of our food supply system and the complicity of large buyers of produce in the exploitation of farmworkers. The event was co-sponsored by The Baltimore Food & Faith Project at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health’s Center for a Livable Future. Our panelists were: poet, activist, minister, organizer and educator Ken Brown, also known as Analysis; food justice, healthcare and labor activist Sergio España; and Rachel Winograd, Food Justice Coordinator for CATA, the Farmworker Support Committee.

As part of the hour we also listen back to my interview from a few years ago with one of the founders of the Coalition of Immokalee Workers, Lucas Benitez.


Sound Bites: Baltimore’s Food System Vision

fruitFebruary 10, 2015 – Segment 3

In our newest edition of our series about our food and our world, Sound Bites, we listen in to a panel discussion Marc moderated at the 14th Annual New Partners for Smart Growth Conference last month about Baltimore’s food-system planning, policy and partnership efforts and how people are shaping and implementing visions for a sustainable local food system.

Our panel of guests included: Anne Palmer, Program Director at Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future; Holly Freishtat, Food Policy Director for the City of Baltimore; Willie Flowers, Executive Director of Park Heights Community Health Alliance; and Walker Marsh, Founder and owner of The Flower Factory.

 


Sound Bites: St. Brigit, Patron Saint Of Sound Bites | Why Did The Chicken Cross The World? | Recipe: Leftover Couscous Salad

Free-range chickens stand in a pen at an organic-accredited poultry farm in Germany.February 3, 2015 – Segment 3

On the newest episode of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world, we begin the show with a look at St. Brigit’s Day, which was celebrated on February 1. St. Brigit is the patron saint of cattle, chicken farmers, dairymaids, dairy workers, milk maids, poultry farmers, poultry raisers, watermen & more – so we deem her the saint of Sound Bites!

Next, I interview journalist Andrew Lawler about his fascinating book Why Did the Chicken Cross the World?

We close out Sound Bites with a special leftover couscous salad recipe from Michael Twitty, Culinary Historian of African and African American Foodways and blogger at Afroculinaria.


Sound Bites: Governor Hogan’s Environmental Policies | Carole Morrison’s Expanding Vision For Agriculture On Delmarva

chickenJanuary 27, 2015 – Segment 4

It’s a brand new episode of Sound Bites, the series about our food and our world. In this episode we examine changes in Maryland’s environmental and agricultural policy under new Governor Larry Hogan. With: Elaine Lutz, attorney for the Maryland Office of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation; Ann Jones, director of Partners for Open Space; and Gerald Winegrad, attorney and Adjunct Professor at the University of Maryland School of Public Policy where he has taught a graduate course on Chesapeake Bay Restoration since 1988.

Then, we’re joined by Carole Morison, poultry farmer and owner of Bird’s Eye View Farm in Pocomoke City, joins us to talk about the expansion of her farm and crowd sourcing campaign.


Sound Bites: Governor-Elect Hogan’s Environmental Agenda | How Will Phosphorus Management Fare This Session? | 2015 Global Food Trends Related To Systematic Change

University of Maryland  Central Maryland Research and Education Center - University Dairy Farm, Clarksville MDJanuary 20, 2015 – Segment 3

On our newest episode of  Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world, we look to Annapolis to examine the environmental agenda of Governor-elect Larry Hogan, with Peter Jensen, editorial writer for The Baltimore Sun

 

Note: Due to technical difficulties, the segment with Peter Jensen is unavailable.

One of Governor-elect Hogan’s first declarations after the election was that he would fight implementation of the Phosphorus Management Tool (PMT), a scientific method of measuring and limiting phosphorus runoff from farms into the waterways. Hogan cited the costs to farmers. Poultry manure, which is rich in phosphorus, is a common-used fertilizer on farms. We host a debate on the PMT, which will be a hot topic in the Maryland Legislature, in our Lead Up To The Annapolis Summit. With: Eric V. Schaeffer, Executive Director of the Environmental Integrity Project and former Director of Civil Enforcement at EPA; and Kevin Anderson, President of the Somerset County Maryland Grain Producers Association.

Join me on January 30th at the Governor Calvert House in Annapolis for the 12th Annual Annapolis Summit, in partnership with The Daily Record. I will interview Maryland’s top political leaders about issues in the Maryland 2015 Legislative Session, including Governor-elect Larry Hogan, Senate President Mike Miller and House Speaker Michael Busch. For information, tickets, and sponsorship opportunities, go to www.thedailyrecord.com/Annapolis-Summit or call Clare Sheehan at 443-524-8101 or email clare.sheehan@thedailyrecord.com.

We close out the show with a look at 5 Global Food Trends of 2015, with Dr. Wayne Roberts, former manager of Toronto Food Policy Council and one of the people who inspired Baltimore’s food policy council. Dr. Roberts is one of Canada’s leading food policy analysts, regular columnist for Rabble, and author of Food for City Building.


Sound Bites: What Does Waterkeeper v. Hudson Trial Mean For Future Maryland Environmental Policies?

art8772wideaJanuary 13, 2015 – Segment 4

On this episode of, Sound Bites, we speak with Kathy Phillips, Assateague Coastkeeper and Executive Director of the Assateague Coastal Trust as we reflect upon the case of Waterkeeper v. Hudson, which in 2013 saw a Baltimore judge rule in favor of the Hudson Family, Eastern Shore Perdue contract chicken farmers sued by the Waterkeeper Alliance for alleged violation of the Clean Water Act.

Next, we discuss the recent documentary produced about the case, Collateral Damage: A Farm and Family Under Attack.  Our guests will include: Gerald Winegrad, attorney and Adjunct Professor at the University of Maryland School of Public Policy where he has taught a graduate course on Chesapeake Bay Restoration since 1988; and Don Rush, News Director, Associate Program Director, and Senior Producer of News and Public Affairs at Public Radio Delmarva (WSCL/WSDL).


Sound Bites: Top Food Stories Of 2014 | How Congress Will Impact Our Food & School Lunches

food stampsJanuary 6, 2015 – Segment 3

On our newest episode of Sound Bites, our series on our food and our world, we reflect upon the top food stories of 2014 with our panel of guests, including: Jenny Hopkinson,  Agriculture and Food Policy writer for Politico Pro; Nathanael Johnson, food writer for Grist; and Tom Philpott, Mother Jones Food and Agriculture reporter.

And, we close out the show with food-related issues on the radar in Congress this year, including SNAP, school lunches, and more. With: Jenny Hopkinson, Michael J. Wilson, Executive Director of Maryland Hunger Solutions; and Rachel Sheffield, policy analyst in the Devos Center for Religion and Civil Society at the Heritage Foundation.


Sound Bites: Doctors Concerned About Antibiotic Use On Healthy Animals | Maryland Poultry Farms Fined Over Pollution | Visit To Hidden Harvest Farm in Baltimore

animalsDecember 30, 2014 – Segment 2

We begin the an archive edition of Sound Bites with a conversation about a poll released last week indicating that 93% of all doctors are concerned about the routine use of antibiotics on healthy farm animals for growth promotion and disease prevention. Our guests will be:Matthew Wellington, Campaign Organizer of Maryland PIRG (Public Interest Research Group); and Dr. Tyler Cymet, practicing physician and President of the Maryland State Medical Society.

Next we turn to news that nearly one in five Maryland poultry farms have been fined for failure to file annual reports on measures they are taking to ensure runoff from their flocks’ manure is not polluting the Chesapeake Bay. With: Tim Wheeler, reporter for B’More Green, the Baltimore Sun’s environmental blog; and Rena Steinzor, President of the Center for Progressive Reform, and grain and poultry farmer Lee Richardson of the Maryland Farm Bureau in Wicomico County.

We close out the show with a visit to Hidden Harvest Farm in Baltimore!


Sound Bites: Gather Baltimore’s Kickstarter Campaign | Plastics and Our Oceans | Schmaltz

trash2December 23, 2014 – Segment 4

Gather Baltimore Founder Arthur Morgan and Earl Johnson, Executive Director of the Come Home Baltimore Foundation, join us to talk about a new kickstarter campaign that will help bring fresh, healthy food to the people of Baltimore.

We take a look at plastics: In the grocery line and in our oceans. Our guests will be: the Rev. Merrrick Moise, writer, community activist, teacher, and one of the first African-American persons ordained within the Old Catholic Movement in Baltimore; and Dr. Marcus Eriksen, Director of Research and co-founder of the 5 Gyres Institute, and lead author of a recent study on plastics and the ocean.

Have you ever eaten schmaltz? We close today’s show with a recipe for this onion-scented chicken fat dish, which has recently gained a younger and more hip fan base. With Melissa Clark, who writes about food for The New York Times.


Sound Bites: Abusing The Chickens We Eat? | Bryant Terry’s ‘Afro-Vegan’

Abusing the chickens we eatDecember 16, 2014 – Segment 3

For the latest edition of our series on our food and our world, Sound Bites. We begin the hour with a look at an op-ed piece by New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof two weeks ago, “Abusing Chickens We Eat.” Kristof documents conditions on a Perdue Farms-contracted chicken farm in North Carolina. Joining us to comment on the column will be: Carole Morrison, chicken farmer, Bird’s Eye View Farm in Pocomoke City; Lee Richardson, Eastern Shore poultry, soy and corn farmer; and Rachel Dreskin, US Food Business Manager for Compassion in World Farming.

Then, listen in to a special Sound Bites archive edition as we talk with chef and food justice activist Bryant Terry about his book Afro-Vegan: Farm-Fresh African, Caribbean, and Southern Flavors Remixed. Bryant, who lives in Oakland, CA, is the host of Urban Organic, a multi-episode web series that he co-created, and has also authored four books, including the critically acclaimed Vegan Soul Kitchen andGrub: Ideas for an Urban Organic Kitchen, which he co-authored with Anna Lappe.


Sound Bites: Where’s The Diversity in the Environmental Movement? | Diverse Legal Concerns for MD Agriculture

protestincineratorDecember 9, 2014 – Segment 4

It’s a brand new episode of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our future. The first segment springs from an article written for The Bay Journal by Whitney Pipkin: “The ‘green ceiling’: Environmental organizations lack diversity.” Pipkin’s article examines”The State of Diversity in Environmental Organizations,” a report issued by the Green 2.0 working group.

Our panel of guests includes: Whitney Pipkin, writer on food, agriculture and the environment for The Bay Journal, Fellow of the Institute for Journalists of Natural resources and blogger at thinkabouteat.com; Fred Tutman, Patuxent Riverkeeper; Dr. Dorceta Taylor,  Professor, Environmental Justice Field of Studies Coordinator, Past Chair of the Environment and Technology Section of the American Sociological Association at the University of Michigan, and author of the report we are discussing and also Toxic Communities:  Environmental Racism, Industrial Pollution, and Residential Mobility; and Jacqueline Patterson, Director of the NAACP Climate Justice Initiative.

We close out the show with a look at a recent report on top legal concerns for Maryland’s agricultural community. We will talk with the report’s co-authors: Paul Goeringer, Extension Legal Specialist in the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources at the University of Maryland; and Dr. Stephan Tubene, Co-Project Director, Outreach for Socially Disadvantaged Farmers and Ranchers Project.


Sound Bites: Maryland Environmental & Agricultural Policy — What Is Governor O’Malley’s Legacy?

frackingDecember 2, 2014 – Segment 3

In the latest installment of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world, we host a Maryland Environmental and Agricultural Policy Roundtable on fracking and phosphorous management.

Our guests are: Joanna Diamond, Executive Director of Environment Maryland; Mitch Jones, Director of the Common Resources Program at Food & Water Watch; David A. Vanko, Dean of the Jess and Mildred Fisher College of Science and Mathematics at Towson University and chairman of the Maryland Marcellus Shale Safe Drilling Initiative Advisory Commission; and Tim Wheeler, reporter for B’More Green, the Baltimore Sun‘s environmental blog.


Sound Bites: Delmarva Secretaries Of Agriculture On The Future Of Our Region

Delmarva Agriculture SecretariesDelmarva Agriculture SecretariesNovember 25, 2014 – Segment 3

On our newest episode of our series on our food and our world, Sound Bites, listen to a panel I moderated last week for the Eastern Shore Land Conservancy‘s 15th Eastern Shore Planning Conference, where I talked with the three Delmarva Secretaries of Agriculture about agricultural and environmental issues important to the Delmarva region: Maryland Secretary of Agriculture Buddy Hance; Virginia Secretary of Agriculture & Forestry Todd Haymore; and Delaware Secretary of Agriculture Ed Kee.


Sound Bites: Phosphorus Management Tool |Baltimore’s Brassica Festival

Brassica_romanescoNovember 18, 2014 – Segment 4

In the newest edition of our series on the food system in Maryland, Sound Bites, we begin the hour with Governor Martin O’Malley’s move forward last week with the Phosphorus Management Tool (PMT). The PMT limits the amount of fertilizer containing phosphorus – a primary source of which is poultry manure – that farmers can spread on their fields, in an effort to reduce phosphorus runoff into the Chesapeake Bay. Our guests are: Maryland Agriculture Secretary Buddy Hance;  Kevin Anderson, President of Maryland Grain Producers Association in Somerset County; Scott Edwards, co-Director of the Food & Water Justice Program at Food & Water Watch; and Lee Richardson, Eastern Shore poultry, soy and corn farmer.

Next: Do you know what Brassica is? It’s a genus of plants that includes cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, and Brussels sprouts. We take a sneak peak at the Brassica Festival, happening this weekend in Baltimore! The event, sponsored by Park Heights Community Health Alliance, will take place on Saturday, November 22, from 10am-5pm, and will include workshops, cooking demonstrations, community discussions, children’s activities, a holiday market, a recipe contest and more! Joining us to talk about the festival are: Willie Flowers, Executive Director of the Park Heights Community Health Alliance; and Karen Washington, co-founder of BUGS (Black Urban Growers), community gardener and board member of the New York Botanical Gardens, and Just Food board member trainer.

The Brassica Fest 2014 will take place on Saturday November 22 at the Harry and Jeannette Weinberg Afya Center. For more information click here or call Saché Jones by phone at 443.844.9956 or email at sjones@phcha.org.


Sound Bites: Veteran Farmers | Effect Of Larry Hogan’s Election On Maryland Environmental & Ag Policy

Matt Soldano, who started Southtown Farms November 11, 2014 – Segment 3

On our Veterans Day edition of Sound Bites we begin the hour by talking to veterans who have embraced farming after returning home from war. First we talk with Matt Soldano, who started Southtown Farms in Mahwah, NJ, after serving four years in the Marine Corps including a combat tour in Iraq.  The following is from the Southtown Farms website:

“… Matt came home to a world that he viewed differently than before he left. He learned respect for all living things and that to take care of oneself is not enough. You must care for your family, your community, your land, the environment, and most importantly the animals that are put into your care.”

And we talk with Army veteran Justen Garrity, Founder and President of Veteran Compost in Aberdeen, Maryland, whose motto is “From Combat to Compost.” Veteran Compost focuses on turning food scraps into high quality organic compost and putting veterans to work. Here is a quote from the Veteran Compost website:

“Following a 15-month deployment in Iraq, Justen decided to transition to the National Guard so that he could be closer to his family.  Returning home to the worst job market in decades, he quickly found himself unemployed.  Justen was forced to create his own destiny.  And so, Veteran Compost was born.  A business that is as fulfilling as the missions he had in the Army.”

Then, we close out Sound Bites by looking at last week’s election results and the potential effect on Maryland’s environmental and agricultural policy. With: Delegate Shane Robinson (D-District 39); Tim Wheeler, reporter for B’More Green, the Baltimore Sun’s environmental blog; and a representative from the Chesapeake Bay Foundation.


Sound Bites: Dangers of Methane | “Bee-Friendly” Plants Actually Harmful To Bees | Baltimore’s Park Heights Farmers Market

Melting of Arctic ice and frozen Siberian tundraNovember 4, 2014 – Segment 4

Listen to a special archive edition of Sound Bites. First we hear a commentary from Jamie Henn, co-Founder and Strategy and Communications Director of 350.org, about the dangers of methane being released from the earth as a result of the melting of Arctic ice and frozen Siberian tundra.

Next we talk with Meme Thomas, Director of Baltimore Honey and maker of B’more Hon E brand raw micro local honey, about a recent report on how supposedly “bee-friendly” plants purchased from some of the big box stores actually contain neonicotinoid pesticides, believed to be responsible in part for the declining bee population.

We close out the show with a look at the Baltimore’s Park Heights Farmers Market, which is open every Wednesday at the corner of Belvedere and Park Heights Avenues. We will hear from: Sache Jones, Food Justice Consultant for Park Heights Community Health Alliance and Manager of the AFYA Community Teaching Garden in Park Heights; Mia Loving, community organizer, entrepreneur, mother and wife; and Willie Flowers, Executive Direct of Park Heights Community Health Alliance.

 


Sound Bites: Doctors Concerned About Antibiotic Use On Healthy Animals | Maryland Poultry Farms Fined Over Pollution | Visit To Hidden Harvest Farm in Baltimore

Hidden Harvest Farm in Baltimore CityOctober 28, 2014 – Segment 4

It’s the newest episode of Sound Bites, our weekly show on our food, our world, and our future! We begin the hour with a poll released last week indicating that 93% of all doctors are concerned about the routine use of antibiotics on healthy farm animals for growth promotion and disease prevention. Our guests will be:Matthew Wellington, Campaign Organizer of Maryland PIRG (Public Interest Research Group); and Dr. Tyler Cymet, practicing physician and President of the Maryland State Medical Society.

Next we turn to news that nearly one in five Maryland poultry farms have been fined for failure to file annual reports on measures they are taking to ensure runoff from their flocks’ manure is not polluting the Chesapeake Bay. With: Tim Wheeler, reporter for B’More Green, the Baltimore Sun’s environmental blog; and Rena Steinzor, President of the Center for Progressive Reform, and grain and poultry farmer Lee Richardson of the Maryland Farm Bureau in Wicomico County.

We close out the show with a visit to Hidden Harvest Farm in Baltimore!

LINK


Sound Bites: How Institutional Buying Practices Can Impact Local Farmers, Both Conventional & Non-Industrial

irrigationOctober 21, 2014 – Segment 3

In our latest episode of Sound Bites we examine the power of large institutions in purchasing food. We hear part of a discussion Marc moderated a couple weeks ago at the Maryland, Delaware and DC Chapter of the Association of Nutrition & Foodservice Professional’s annual “Workshop by the Sea” in Ocean City, Maryland. We discussed both conventional and non-industrial agriculture in the context of institutional food buying. The panel participated in a wide-ranging discussion about the benefits, challenges and future of both models.

With: Cleo Braver, certified organic farmer at Cottingham Farm, lawyer, and Founder of the Eastern Shore Food Hub; Joe Forsthoffer, Corporate Communications Director of Perdue Farms; Karen Jenkins, Administrator at the Genesis Hammonds Lane Center in Baltimore; Louise Mitchell, PT, Sustainable Foods Program Manager at the Maryland Hospitals for a Healthy Environment and Regional Organizer for Healthy Food in Health Care and Health Care Without Harm; and Charles Wright, conventional farmer and owner of Wright’s Market in Wicomico County.

To hear the full audio from the event, visit soundbitesradio.org.

LINK


Best of Sound Bites: Small Farmers Talk About Why They Farm

Boone Street FarmOctober 14, 2014 – Segment 2

Listen in to a special broadcast of some of the “Best of” our Sound Bites series, including my interview with Wenonah Hauter, Executive Director of Food and Water Watch and author of Foodopoly: The Battle Over the Future of Food and Farming in America; our visit to the Cherry Hill Urban Garden in Baltimore; our roundtable with local farmers about why they farm; and my interview with Bryant Terry about his cookbook Afro Vegan.

The premium for the second hour will be a copy of Foodopoly. Everyone interested in food and our food system will want a copy! Also in studio will be Naijha Wright of the Land of Kush restaurant.

Included here is the podcast from our roundtable with small farmers, including: Denzel Mitchell, Founder and Farm Manager, Five Seeds Family Farm and Apiary; Cheryl Carmona, Co-founder of Boone Street Farm in East Baltimore; Ted Wycall third generation farmer at Greenbranch Farm in Salisbury, MD; and Carole Morrison of Bird’s Eye View Farm in Pocomoke City.

LINK


Sound Bites: Greener Garden Urban Farm and Oak Hill Honey

bluesOctober 7, 2014 – Segment 4

On our newest edition of Sound Bites, we take a trip to the Greener Garden Urban Farm in Baltimore, where we will hear from: Warren and LaVette Blue, farmers at Greener Garden Urban Farm; and Willie Flowers, Executive Director of the Park Heights Community Health Alliance.

 We close out the show with a piece on harvesting honey In the city, with: Dane Nester, beekeeper at Oak Hill Honey in Baltimore. It was produced by former Sound Bites intern Maggie Dier. 

LINK


Sound Bites: Berkeley’s Soda Tax Failed / Phosphorus Management Tool / Wild and Scenic Film Festival

Soda TaxSeptember 30, 2014 – Segment 3

Stay tuned for the latest edition of our series Sound Bites! We begin with Nathanael Johnson, food writer for Grist, who recently wrote an article about a controversial proposed tax in Berkeley, California … on soda!

Then, we take a look at the debate in Maryland over the implementation of the Phosphorus Management Tool, a method of identifying fields that contain the most phosphorous and have the highest risk of phosphorus runoff. Phosphorus is one of the main three pollutants in the Chesapeake Bay. Our panel of guests includes: Tim Wheeler, reporter for B’More Green, the Baltimore Sun‘s environmental blog; and Kevin Anderson, President of the Maryland Grain Producers Association and Grain Farmer at Wimberly Farms in Princess Anne, Maryland.

We close out the show with a sneak peek at the Wild and Scenic Film Festival, which is coming to Annapolis on Thursday, October 2! Our guests will include: Robin Broder, Board Member of Waterkeepers Chesapeake who is hosting the festival; and Assateague Coastkeeper Kathy Phillips.

LINK


Sound Bites: Debating Agritourism | Perdue’s Power | CLF Aquaponics Project & Pesto Basil Recipe

agritourismSeptember 23, 2014 – Segment 3

We kick off our newest edition of Sound Bites with a discussion and debate on AgriTourism, in light of a controversial bill introduced last week by Baltimore County Third District Councilman Todd Huff. What does AgriTourism mean? How does it benefit farmers? Why is this such a hot-button issue across the country? Our guests will be: Teresa Moore, Executive Director at The Valleys Planning Council; and Wayne McGinnis, farmer and Baltimore County Planning Board member.

 Then we turn to poultry giant Perdue Farms, whose Chairman Jim Perdue was quoted in the Baltimore Business Journal as saying that they have no seat at the table in Maryland. Peter Jensen, author and editorial writer for The Baltimore Sun, begged to differ in today’s editorial, and he joins us to discuss it.

We close out the show with a special basil cashew pesto recipe from the Hopkins’ Center for a Livable Future Aquaponics Project at the Cylburn Arboretum!

LINK


Sound Bites: Perdue Stops Antibiotic Use in Hatcheries | Cherry Hill Urban Garden in Baltimore | September Foraging

Cherry Hill Urban GardenSeptember 16, 2014 – Segment 3

Listen to a brand new episode of Sound Bites! In the first segment, our guests reflect upon the recent announcement that poultry producer Perdue plans to stop the use of antibiotics in its hatcheries. Our guests include: Mitch Jones, Director of the Common Resources Program at Food and Water Watch; and Dr. Keeve Nachman, Director, Food Production and Public Health Program, Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future.

To learn more about the issue of antibiotic resistance, plan to attend the movie Resistance, a showing sponsored by Food & Water Watch, this Thursday, September 18, at the Rotunda Theatre in Baltimore. 

Next we take a field trip to the Cherry Hill Urban Garden in Baltimore. You will hear from Juanita Ewell, Founder and Manager of the garden, resident of Cherry Hill, and chairperson of the Cherry Hill Development Corporation’s Economic Development Committee. Then plan to attend the Cherry Hill Harvest Festival on Saturday, October 18!

We close out the show with Ava Chin, author of Eating Wildly: Foraging for Life, Love and the Perfect Meal, who tells us about the wild edibles you can find out in the world in the month of September!

LINK


Sound Bites: The Meat Racket: The Secret Takeover of America’s Food Business

meatSeptember 9, 2014 – Segment 3

It’s a special archive episode of Sound Bites! Listen in to the informative and lively town hall meeting that took place on May 15 at the Enoch Pratt Free Library, featuring Marc‘s interview with Christopher Leonard about his latest book The Meat Racket: The Secret Takeover of America’s Food Business. Leonard, an investigative reporter, went looking to do a profile on the Tysons – the premier family in the poultry business – and was surprised at what he learned in the process.The Meat Racket reveals the inner workings of the corporations that control the food business, and the power in Washington of the meat and poultry lobbies.

LINK


Sound Bites: Can GMOs Feed a Hot & Hungry World? | Urban Beekeeping | Recipe from Boone Street Farm: Ground Cherry Salsa

Boone Street FarmSeptember 2, 2014 – Segment 3

It’s a brand new episode of Sound Bites. We’ll talk about a recent article from The Nation that asks the question Can GMOs Feed a Hot and Hungry World? We’ll speak with the author of that article, Madeline Ostrander, who is a contributing editor to YES! Magazine and a freelance writer based in Seattle. We’ll also be joined by Dr. Eduardo Blumwald who studies genetic engineering at UC Davis; and Patty Lovera, Assistant Director of Food & Water Watch, where she coordinates the Food Team.

Then, we are joined by Alison Gillespie, author of Hives in the City: Keeping Honey Bees Alive in an Urban World, for a fascinating conversation on urban beekeeping.

To close out this week’s Sound Bites, former Sound Bites intern Maggie Dier brings us a recipe for ground cherry salsa from Cheryl Carmona and Dana Rushovich of Boone Street Farm, an urban farm in East Baltimore.

LINK


Sound Bites: How We Talk About Climate Change

polarbearsAugust 26, 2014 – Segment 3

It’s a brand new episode of Sound Bites where the topic is Climate Change, and our discussion springs from an article by Charles Mann in this month’s Atlantic Monthly: “How to Talk about Climate Change so People Will Listen.” First we examine the historical context of the climate change debate. Our guests are: Dr. Paul Sabin, associate professor in the Department of History at Yale University, Director of Undergraduate Studies for Yale’s undergraduate Environmental Studies major, and author of The Bet: Paul Ehrlich, Julian Simon, and Our Gamble Over Earth’s Future; and Dr. Dale Jamieson, professor of Environmental Studies and Philosophy, Affiliated Professor of Law, and Director of the Animal Studies Initiative at New York University, and author of Reason in a Dark Time: Why the Struggle to Stop Climate Change Failed – and What It Means For Our Future.

We close out Sound Bites with a diverse panel of guests who consider the reality of climate change and how we can effectively talk about it. Our guests are: Dr. Patrick Allitt, Cahoon Family Professor of American History at Emory University and author of A Climate of Crisis: America in the Age of EnvironmentalismJacqui Patterson, Director of the NAACP Environmental and Climate Justice Program;Daphne Wysham, a fellow at the Institute for Policy Studies (IPS) where she directs the Genuine Progress Project; and Maryam Adrangi, campaigner with the Council of Canadians and organizer with a member of Rising Tide: Vancouver Coast Salish Territories.

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Sound Bites: Debating ‘Don’t Let Your Children Grow Up To Be Farmers’

Baltimore, MD -7/2/14- Denzel Mitchell, of Baltimore, harvests for cucumbers Wednesday afternoon. Mitchell owns operates his farm, "Five Seeds Farm" and provides it's vegetables to local Baltimore restaurants.  Rachel Woolf/Baltimore Sun -- #7308August 19, 2014 – Segment 3

On a live (call-in) episode of Sound Bites, we look at the state of small farmers today. As a follow-up to last week’s New York Times article “Don’t let your children grow up to be farmers,” the first question we ask is: Are small farmers able to survive and prosper off the land? With: Don Bustos of the Santa Cruz Farm in NM, an award-winning sustainable farmer who produces food on the same New Mexico land his ancestors have farmed for 300 years; Joel Salatin, who wrote a response to the Times article, is a full-time farmer in Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley and author of Folks, This Ain’t Normal: A Farmer’s Advice for Happier Hens, Healthier People, and a Better World; and Jenny Hopkinson, who covers Agriculture and Food Policy issues for Politico Pro.

Following that discussion, small farmers weigh in and talk about their own experiences: Denzel Mitchell, Founder and Farm Manager, Five Seeds Family Farm and Apiary; Cheryl Carmona, Co-founder of Boone Street Farm in East Baltimore; Ted Wycall third generation farmer at Greenbranch Farm in Salisbury, MD; and Carole Morrison of Bird’s Eye View Farm in Pocomoke City.

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Sound Bites: US Apples Banned in EU | Chicken Nuggets | Eating Wildly

applesAugust 12, 2014 – Segment 3

In this week’s edition of Sound Bites, listen in to find out why U.S.apples have been banned in Europe, with: Tom Philpott, Mother Jones Food and Agriculture correspondent; Sonya Lunder, Senior Analyst with the Environmental Working Group; and Marilyn Dolan, Executive Director of the Alliance for Food and Farming.

Then we take a look at what’s in your chicken nuggets! Tom Philpott, Mother Jones Food and Agriculture correspondent, shares some unsettling facts about the ingredients in those finger-sized treats that have become a staple of fast food America.

We close out the show with Ava Chin, author of Eating Wildly: Foraging for Life, Love and the Perfect Meal, who tells us about the wild edibles you can find out in the world in the month of August.

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Sound Bites: Poultry Manure-Burning Power Plant on the Eastern Shore | 1 in 3 Restaurant Workers Food Insecure

Manure to EnergyAugust 5, 2014 – Segment 4

We begin our newest episode of Sound Bites with an update on the status of the proposed poultry manure-burning power plant on Maryland’s Eastern Shore. The Baltimore Sun reported last week that the state of the plant is now in limbo, with Maryland state officials considering whether to give Green Planet Power Solutions, the company chosen to build the 13.4-megawatt plant, a nearly $35 million subsidy. Our guests are: Patrick Thompson, President and CEO of EnergyWorks Group based in Annapolis, Maryland; Ann Swanson, Executive Director of the Chesapeake Bay Commission; Tim Wheeler, reporter for The Baltimore Sun; and Michele Merkel, co-director of the Food and Water Justice Project at Food and Water Watch.

Last week the Nation magazine reported that nearly one in every three restaurant workers suffers from food insecurity. With us to discuss this statistic is Michelle Chen, writer for the Nation, contributing editor at In These Times, associate editor at CultureStrike, and co-producer of “Asia Pacific Forum” on Pacifica’s WBAI and Dissent Magazine’s “Belabored” podcast.

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Sound Bites: Pizza King | Phosphorous Regulation | Acting Well

Photo by Justin Levy

Photo by Justin Levy

July 29, 2014 – Segment 3

We start off this week’s episode of Sound Bites with a story about a local man who has eaten pizza every day for 25 years. We talk with Dan Janssen, who has been eating almost nothing but pizza for 25 years and is the subject of a VICE “Munchies” documentary called Pizza King; and Justin Levy, producer of the documentary.

Then look at how the O’Malley administration is approaching phosphorus regulations for the Chesapeake Bay, with Tim Wheeler, reporter for B’More Green, the Baltimore Sun‘s environmental blog.

We close the show by listening in to the second installment of the broadcast of the last of our series of Good Food Gathering Town Hall Meetings: Acting Well. The meeting was held on July 9 at the Netivot Shalom Congregation in Pikesville. We explored how congregations and individuals can engage in projects – from communal gardens to policy work – that have the potential to effect systemic change on our food system. Joining us were: Dr. Surina Jordan, who conducts wellness classes at Huber Memorial Church, and is author of the book The Seven Disciplines of WellnessAbbe Zuckerberg, who organized a faith garden and compost project at Netivot Shalom Congregation; Robi Rawl, who is the Executive Director of Sugar Free Kids, an organization that encourages congregations to engage in political actions that improve the health of children; and Michael J. Wilson, Executive Director of Maryland Hunger Solutions.

This town hall meeting was sponsored by the  Baltimore Food & Faith ProjectInterfaith Power & Light, and The Marc Steiner Show.

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Sound Bites: Good Food Gathering — Acting Well

gardenJuly 22, 2014 -Segment 3

This month, Marc moderated another Good Food Gathering Town Hall Meeting, this time at the Netivot Shalom Congregation in Pikesville. We discussed “Acting Well,” and explored how congregations and individuals can effect systemic change on our food system. Joining us were Dr. Surina Jordan, who conducts wellness classes at Huber Memorial Church, and author of the book The Seven Disciplines of Wellness;Abbe Zuckerberg, who organized a faith garden and compost project at Netivot Shalom Congregation; Robi Rawl, who is the Executive Director of Sugar Free Kids, an organization that encourages congregations to engage in political actions that improve the health of children; and Michael J. Wilson, Executive Director of Maryland Hunger Solutions.
This town hall meeting was sponsored by the Hopkins Baltimore Food & Faith Project, Interfaith Power & Light, and The Marc Steiner Show.

Sound Bites: Dangers of Methane | “Bee-Friendly” Plants Actually Harmful To Bees | Baltimore’s Park Heights Farmers Market

"Bee Friendly" plants harmful to beesJuly 15, 2014 – Segment 4

In the newest edition of Sound Bites, we hear a commentary from Jamie Henn, 350.org co-founder and Strategy and Communications Director, about the dangers of methane being released from the earth as a result of the melting of Arctic ice and frozen Siberian tundra.

Next we talk with Meme Thomas, Director of Baltimore Honey and maker of B’more Hon E brand raw micro local honey, about a recent report on how supposedly “bee-friendly” plants, purchased from some of the big box stores, actually contain neonicotinoid pesticides, which are thought to be responsible in part for the declining bee population.

We close out the show with a look at Baltimore’s Park Heights Farmers Market, which is open every Wednesday at the corner of Belvedere and Park Heights Avenues from 9:00am to 2:00pm. We will hear from: Sache Jones, Food Justice Consultant for Park Heights Community Health Alliance and Manager of the AFYA Community Teaching Garden in Park Heights; Mia Loving, community organizer, entrepreneur, mother and wife; and Willie Flowers, Executive Direct of Park Heights Community Health Alliance.

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Sound Bites: Park Heights Farmers Market | Urban Foraging | Undercover Ag Drones | Special Recipe

parkheightsJuly 8, 2014 – Segment 3

First, we turn our attention to Baltimore’s Park Heights Farmers Market, in the newest edition of Sound Bites! The market is open every Wednesday at the corner of Belvedere and Park Heights Avenues, from 9:00am to 2:00pm. We will hear from: Sache Jones, Food Justice Consultant for Park Heights Community Health Alliance (PHCHA) and Manager of the AFYA Community Teaching Garden in Park Heights; Willie Flowers, Executive Direct of PHCHA; and Mia Loving, community organizer, entrepreneur, mother and wife.

Next we talk with author and urban forager Ava Chin, who will tell us how to Eat Wildly in the Month of July! Chin is former “Urban Forager” columnist for the New York Times’ City Room and author of Eating Wildly: Foraging for Life, Love, and the Perfect Meal.

Then we look at a new possible use of drones – undercover investigations by animal rights groups on industrial farms. We will talk with Will Potter, a journalist who focuses on animal rights, environmental movements, and civil liberties and is author of Green Is The New Red: An Insider’s Account of a Social Movement Under Siege.

We close out the show with a special Seasonal Recipe from one of our favorite farmers- Denzel Mitchell, Founder and Farm Manager of Five Seeds Family Farm and Apiary!

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Sound Bites: Chesapeake Bay | Climate Justice | Gather Baltimore

stop-the-incineratorJuly 1, 2014 – Segment 4

We begin our weekly hour of Sound Bites by checking in with Tim Wheeler, reporter for The Baltimore Sun‘s environmental blog B’More Green, on the Chesapeake Bay. Next we talk about climate change across the U.S. with Jacqueline Patterson, Director of the NAACP Climate Justice Initiative; and Brentin Mock, a journalist who writes about environmental issues for Grist. We close out the show with a visit from Arthur Morgan, founder of Gather Baltimore. Gather Baltimore will be hosting a fundraiser spaghetti dinner next week.

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Sound Bites: School Lunch & The Hunger Gap | MD Enviro & Ag Legislative Priorities | Update: Cove Point LNG

School LunchesJune 24, 2014 – Segment 4

On the latest edition of Sound Bites, we kick off the hour with a debriefing by Michael J. Wilson, Director of Maryland Hunger Solutions, on current government policy and food for kids.

Then, our roundtable of panelists joins me to talk about issues concerning food, agriculture and the environment, which are in play on this primary election day. With: Joanna Diamond, Director of Environment Maryland; Mitch Jones, Director of the Common Resources Program at Food and Water Watch; and Jeremy Cox, reporter at The Daily Times of Salisbury.

We close out the show with an update on the liquid natural gas export facility at Cove Point, with Mike Tidwell, Director of the Chesapeake Climate Action Network.

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Sound Bites: Good Food Gathering Town Hall Meeting: Donating Well

foodbankJune 17, 2014 – Segment 4

On a brand new episode of Sound Bites, we hear the Good Food Gathering Town Hall Meeting held last Thursday night at the Franciscan Center of Baltimore, in our latest episode of Sound Bites. Our inspirational panel talks about what it means to “Donate Well” and shares creative ideas and programs for providing healthy food to Baltimoreans in need. The speakers were: Willie Flowers, Executive Director of Park Heights Community Health AllianceDanise Jones-Dorsey, Executive Director of My Brother’s KeeperChristian Metzger, Executive Director of The Franciscan Center of Baltimore; and Arthur Morgan, Founder of Gather Baltimore. The event was sponsored by: Baltimore Food & Faith ProjectInterfaith Power & Light, and The Marc Steiner Show.

 

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Sound Bites: Eating Wildly with Ava Chin | Bryant Terry’s ‘Afro-Vegan’

Bryant TerryJune 10, 2014 – Segment 3

On the newest edition of Sound Bites we bring you two fascinating conversations around creative food gathering, preparing, and eating. First we talk with writer and forager Ava Chin, who joins us to talk about her memoir Eating Wildly: Foraging for Life, Love, and the Perfect Meal. Chin is the former “Urban Forager” columnist for The New York Times’ City Room, and The Huffington Postnamed her one of “9 Contemporary Authors You Should Be Reading.”

We finish out the show with chef and food justice activist Bryant Terry, who will tell us about his newest book Afro-Vegan: Farm-Fresh African, Caribbean, and Southern Flavors RemixedTerry,who lives in Oakland, CA, is the host of Urban Organic, a multi-episode web series that he co-created, and he has also written four books, including the critically acclaimed Vegan Soul Kitchen and Grub: Ideas for an Urban Organic Kitchen, which he co-authored with Anna Lappe.

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Sound Bites: The Meat Racket-The Secret Takeover of America’s Food Business

meatJune 3, 2014 – Segment 3

We have a special episode of Sound Bites! We listen in on the informative and lively town hall meeting that took place on May 15 at the Enoch Pratt Free Library, featuring my interview with Christopher Leonard about his new book The Meat Racket: The Secret Takeover of America’s Food Business. Leonard, an investigative reporter, went looking to do a profile on the premier family in the poultry business, and was surprised at what he learned in the process. The Meat Racket reveals the inner workings of the corporations that control the food business, and the power in Washington of the meat and poultry lobbies.

 The town hall meeting was co-sponsored by The Marc Steiner Show/Center for Emerging Media, Food & Water WatchAssateague Coastkeeper, and Baltimore GreenWorks.

Mark your calendar for our next Good Food Gathering Town Hall, June 12 at 7:00pm, at the Franciscan Center, 101 W. 23rd Street in Baltimore, in conjunction with theFood & Faith Project at Johns Hopkins’ Center for Livable Future. We will talk about “Donating Well,” and discuss creative ways to provide fresh healthy food to our communities. Our panel of guests will include Christian Metzger, Executive Director of the Franciscan Center, and Arthur Morgan of Gather Baltimore and the Hamilton Crop Circle. 

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Sound Bites: Good Food Gathering on ‘Teaching Well,’ Part 2

Good Food Gathering: Teaching WellMay 27, 2014 – Segment 4

In a new segment of our series about the food we eat, Sound Bites, we broadcast the second part of a fascinating and inspiring panel discussion and town hall meeting held two weeks ago at Pleasant Hope Baptist Church in Baltimore. The meeting is part of a series called Good Food Gatherings, produced in conjunction with Johns Hopkins’ Center for Livable Future Food & Faith Project and Interfaith Power & Light. Our topic was Teaching Well: How can we educate our youth, adults, and communities about “good food?” The panelists were: The Reverend Dr. Heber Brown, pastor of Pleasant Hope and community leader; Ari Witkin, organizer, educator and facilitator; and Dr. Jeanette Hablullah, healer, author and Doctor of Naturopathy. 

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Sound Bites: Overfishing In The Bay? | Food And Faith

crabMay 20, 2014 – Segment 3

It’s the latest edition of our show on the food system and the food we eat, Sound Bites! Today we ask the question “Are the crabs and fish in the Chesapeake Bay being over-harvested?” Our debate over crabbing and fishing in the Chesapeake features: Gerald Winegrad, attorney and Adjunct Professor at the University of Maryland School of Public Policy where he has taught a graduate course on Chesapeake Bay Restoration since 1988; Brenda Davis, Natural Resources Biologist at the Maryland Department of Natural Resources; and Tom Parham, Environmental Specialist at the Maryland Department of Natural Resources.

We close out the show with the first part of a fascinating and inspiring panel discussion and town hall meeting held last week at Pleasant Hope Baptist Church in Baltimore, part of a series called Good Food Gatherings, in conjunction with Johns Hopkins’ Center for Livable Future Food & Faith Project and Interfaith Power & Light. The topic was Teaching Well: How can we educate our youth, adults, and communities about “good food?” The panelists were: The Reverend Dr. Heber Brown, pastor of Pleasant Hope and community leader; Ari Witkin, organizer, educator and facilitator; and Dr. Jeanette Hablullah, healer, author and Doctor of Naturopathy.

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Sound Bites: Is Soylent The End of Food? | How The Food Giants Hooked Us | CSX Derailment Pollutes James River | Recipe: Garlic Scapes

SoylentMay 13, 2014 – Segment 4

In the latest edition of Sound Bites, I talk with Bhaskar Sunkara, founding Editor of Jacobin and a Senior Editor at In These Times, on Sunkara’s recent op-ed for Al Jazeera America called “Let’s Embrace the End of Food,” about soylent, a powdered meal replacement.

Then, Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter Michael Moss joins us to talk about his book Salt Sugar Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us.

We also look at the April 30th CSX train derailment in Lynchburg, Virginia, which dumped more than 20,000 gallons of crude into the James River, with Pat Calvert, Upper James Riverkeeper, and Jamie Brunkow, Lower James Riverkeeper.

We close out the show with a recipe for garlic scapes from Kristen Carbone of Radix Farm.

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Sound Bites: From Our Archives – Behind The Kitchen Door | A Kayak Trip Through Delmarva

Saru Jayaraman May 6, 2014 – Segment 3

This week on Sound Bites we start with a conversation about the poor working conditions in America’s restaurant industry, with activist, author, and professor Saru Jayaraman. Jayaraman’s new book, Behind The Kitchen Door, examines how restaurant workers survive on some of the lowest wages in America and investigates how this fact impacts the food arriving at our tables. 

We conclude this week’s Sound Bites by taking a look at the Delmarva Peninsula with Tom Horton, Professor of Practice in Environmental Studies at Salisbury University who covered the environment for the Baltimore Sun for 35 years, and Bill Nelson, Lecturer in Environmental Studies at Salisbury University. When they returned from a month-long kayak trip around Delmarva with a group of students from the university, they joined us to discuss the region’s length and breadth, its edges and interiors, and its people and critters.

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Sound Bites: Eat Less Chicken / American Apples Banned in Europe / The Bay Bridge Ospreys

Why american apples just got banned in EuropeApril 29, 2014 – Segment 3

We begin our newest edition of Sound Bites with a look at a commentary that was recently published in the Baltimore Sun, called “Eat less chicken” which addresses the amount of water used in raising chickens. We will talk with the author of the commentary, Paul Shapiro, who is Vice President of Farm Animal Protection for the Humane Society of the United States.

Next we look at a new development around American apples being banned in Europe, with: Tom Philpott, Mother Jones Food and Agriculture correspondent whose recent article is titled: “Why American Apples Just Got Banned in Europe;” Sonya Lunder, Senior Analyst with the Environmental Working Group; and Marilyn Dolan, Executive Director of the Alliance for Food and Farming.

We close out the show with a look at the “Bay Bridge Ospreys,” a pair of ospreys who were persistent about building their nest in front of the traffic camera on the bridge. Listen in to hear how this situation was resolved, with Tim Wheeler, reporter for B’More Green, the Baltimore Sun‘s environmental blog, who has been covering this story.

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Sound Bites: Cove Point | State Of The Bay | Will Allen

Will AllenApril 22, 2014 – Segment 3

We begin the latest edition of Sound Bites with a discussion on Cove Point and climate change, with Mark Hertsgaard, Fellow for the New America Foundation and author of, most recently, Hot: Living Through the Next Fifty Years on Earth.

Next we look at the state of Chesapeake Bay Restoration, with Gerald Winegrad, attorney and Adjunct Professor at the University of Maryland School of Public Policy where he has taught a graduate course on Chesapeake Bay Restoration since 1988.

We close out Sound Bites with a special segment on urban farming with urban farming icon Will Allen. Allen, a former professional basketball player, is the CEO of Growing Power, a nonprofit organization that works to help provide equal access to healthy, high-quality, safe and affordable food for people in all communities. He is also the co-author of The Good Food Revolution: Growing Healthy Food, People and Communities.

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Sound Bites: Organic Agriculture | Valleys Of Baltimore County | Gerald Winegrad

baltimore countyApril 15, 2014 – Segment 4

It’s a brand new episode of Sound Bites. We start with Coach Mark Smallwood, Executive Director of the Rodale Institute, a nonprofit organization founded in 1954 and dedicated to pioneering organic farming through research and outreach, located in Kutztown, Pennsylvania.

Then we turn to beautiful northern Baltimore County, a land of fertile valleys, where visionaries in the 1960s decided that they were not going to allow development to overtake this pastoral paradise of rolling landscapes. The Plan for the Valleys was one of the first land planning documents to use ecology as the central theme. We talk with filmmaker Allen Moore about his stunning film, Designing with Nature: The Plan for the Valleys, which documents the fascinating history of how a few dedicated and committed people created the Valleys Planning Council and were able to save and preserve the Valleys. You will have the opportunity to watchDesigning with Nature next week on Maryland Public Television.

We close out the show with former Maryland State Senator and Adjunct Professor at the University of Maryland School of Public Policy Gerald Winegrad, on Chesapeake Bay restoration.

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Sound Bites: Dr. George Washington Carver

georgewashingtoncarverApril 8, 2014 – Segment 2

This week is the WEAA Spring Membership Drive, so tune in for compelling topics and wonderful premiums! Now is your opportunity to support the station you have come to love: WEAA, THE Voice of the Community. Call 410-319-8888 or visit weaa.org to make your pledge of support during the show.

We discuss the life and legacy of Dr. George Washington Carver, in a special edition of Sound Bites! Our guests  are: Mark Hersey, author of My Work Is That Of Conservation: An Environmental Biography of George WashingtonCarver; Denzel Mitchell, founder and Farm Manager of Five Seeds Family Farm and Apiary; and Tonya Bolden, author of the children’s book George Washington Carver.

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Sound Bites: Prince George’s County Agriculture — Accokeek Foundation / P.A. Bowen Farmstead / Bald Eagle Farm

Accokeek FoundationApril 1, 2014 – Hour 2

In this week’s episode of Sound Bites, we travel to Prince George’s County and visit three farms,The Accokeek Foundation at Piscataway Park; P.A. Bowen Farmstead; and cattle farmer Yates Clagett of Bald Eagle Farm; for perspectives on sustainability, land stewardship, and how to remain economically viable in a shifting marketplace.

First, we visit the Accokeek Foundation, an educational farm on the Potomac River in Piscataway Park that runs programs about environmental stewardship, land conservation, and sustainable agriculture. They run training programs in organic farming, and host programs for young people, as well. We talk to: Dr. Lisa Hayes, the President and CEO of the Accokeek Foundation; Community Outreach and Education Coordinator Molly MeehanSky Harman, Ecosystem Farm Apprentice; and Livestock Manager Polly Festa.

Sally Fallon Morrel and Geoffrey Morrel of Brandywine, MD have a small herd of Jersey cows on their land, the PA Bowen Farmstead, that they milk for artisan cheese. They also raise chickens, pigs, turkeys in a mixed-species pasture-based farm that incorporates bio-dynamic methods. We started with a tour of their dairy operation.

Then, we continue our journey in Prince George’s County with Yates Clagett, a small-scale cattle farmer who has been selling his grass-fed meat locally in the region’s niche market. He is also the PG County Farm Bureau President and has spearheaded the purchase of freezers for local meat sales. He talked to us about what sustainability means to him in terms of the environment and economic viability, and he documented the challenges the current distribution infrastructure in Southern Maryland, changing state regulations, and market forces play in his quest to raise quality beef.

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Sound Bites: All About Kids! / Hear the Maryland Crunch / Food Allergies / Improving School Lunches / Recipe: Oven “Fried” Chicken

public-school-lunch-food March 25, 2014 – Segment 4

On the latest edition of Sound Bites, we celebrate Maryland Day by learning about Hear the Maryland Crunch,an educational event designed to spread the message that every child in Maryland should have access to a healthy breakfast. The event includes a statewide, synchronized bite into apples. Our guest will be Michael J. Wilson, Director of Maryland Hunger Solutions.

Then we look at the increase in food allergies in African American children, with Dr. Corinne Keet. Keet is an assistant professor of Pediatrics at Johns Hopkins Children’s Center, where she specializes in Allergies and Immunology and authored an article in the March issue of Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology: “Temporal trends and racial/ethnic disparity in self-reported pediatric food allergy in the United States.”

Then its time for a special treat, when we talk about school lunches, with: Chef Ann Cooper, the “Renegade Lunch Lady” and Founder of the Food Family Farming Foundation, whose most recent book is Lunch Lessons: Changing the Way We Feed Our Children; and award-winning film producer, author, and holistic health counselor Amy Kalafa, who produced the documentary Two Angry Moms and is the author of Lunch Wars: How to Start a School Food Revolution and Win the Battle for Our Children’s Health. We close the show with a recipe for oven “fried” chicken from Chef Ann.

Chef Ann and Amy Kalafa will be at Washington College in Chestertown later this week. Chef Ann will deliver the Keynote Address at the 2014 Locavore Lit Fest on Friday, March 28th, and Amy will speak at Emmanuel Church on Saturday, March 29th.

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Sound Bites: GMO Labeling / Environmental News / Black Liquor / Pesticides & Children’s Brain

black liquorMarch 18, 2014 – Segment 3

We start with a debate on GMO Labeling in Maryland, given a bill being considered in Annapolis that would require the labeling of genetically-modified foods. Joining us are Colin O’Neil, Director of Government Affairs for the Center for Food Safety, and Colby Ferguson, Director of Government Relations for the Maryland Farm Bureau.

Then, Tim Wheeler, Reporter for B’More Green, The Baltimore Sun’s environmental blog, joins us for an update on news coming out of the legislature and beyond — all related to food, agriculture and our environment.

We then hear a commentary from Tommy Landers, Maryland Policy Director at the Chesapeake Climate Action Network, on what just happened with “black liquor” in Maryland.

We close this week’s Sound Bites with a conversation on pesticides and our children’s health with Susan Freinkel, Freelance Journalist and Author of Plastics: A Toxic Love Story. She wrote an article last week for The Nation, titled “Warning Signs: How Pesticides Harm the Young Brain.”

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Sound Bites: Happy Hens / Station North Food Hub / What’s Your Kitchen Literacy?

Joel SalatinMarch 11, 2014 – Segment 3

This week on Sound Bites, we begin with Joel Salatin, full-time farmer in Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley at Polyface Inc., “The Farm of Many Faces,” and author of Folks, This Ain’t Normal: A Farmer’s Advice for Happier Hens, Healthier People, and a Better World.

Then, we talk with Liam Flynn and Steve Marsh of Open Plough, a Baltimore-based coalition of farmers, entrepreneurs, educators, and chefs, working to build a food hub for local residents in the Station North neighborhood of Baltimore. Flynn is the owner of Liam Flynn’s Ale House in Baltimore, and Marsh is a chef, brewmaster and farmer.

How good is your kitchen literacy? We close out the show with Ann Vileisis, author of Kitchen Literacy: How We Lost Knowledge of Where Food Comes from and Why We Need to Get It Back.

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Sound Bites: Talking Nutrition / Beginner Farmers / What’s In Your Chicken?

Was This Chicken Inspected?March 4, 2014 – Segment 4

In this week’s Sound Bites, we begin by talking nutrition, with fitness professional and community activist Chauncey Whitehead; professional trainer and bodybuilder Ernestine Shepherd; and registered dietician Angela Ginn-Meadow.

We shine a light on the Future Harvest-CASA Beginner Farmer Training Program, with current beginner farmer Aleya Fraser and former program participant Denzel Mitchell.

We close out the show with a humorous look at a not-so-funny issue: industrial poultry farming. Last month Food and Water Watch released a new video on the topic, featuring Once Upon A Time star Raphael Sbarge. Watch the video here, and tune in as Sbarge joins our discussion, along with Food and Water Watch Senior Lobbyist Tony Corbo.

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Sound Bites: Food Insecurity And Seniors | “Stop Cove Point” Protest & Dominion Energy Response | Poultry Fair Share Act Dead In Maryland?

stop-cove-pointFebruary 25, 2014 – Segment 4

It’s a brand new episode of Sound Bites. First, we talk about food security among the elderly. Our guests are: Michael J. Wilson, Director of Maryland Hunger Solutions; and Shelley White, Program Coordinator for Real Food Farm in Baltimore.

Then, Sound Bites producer Stefanie Mavronis brings us a story about the “Stop Cove Point” rally that took place in downtown Baltimore last Thursday. Hundreds gathered at War Memorial Plaza while Dominion Energy, the energy group proposing the liquefied natural gas export facility, met about an essential permit it needs from the Maryland Public Service Commission for its $3.8 billion facility in Southern Maryland. We hear from: Delegate Heather Mizeur, gubernatorial candidate who spoke at the rally; Jon Kenney, Southern Maryland Organizer for the Chesapeake Climate Action NetworkJeannette Berman of CCANEmily Wurth, Food & Water Watch‘s Water Program Director; Pennsylvania activist Elizabeth Arnold; and activist Nadine Block.

Then, we hear a response from Pam Faggert, Dominion Energy‘s Chief Environmental Officer.

We close out this week’s Sound Bites with a look at the status of the Poultry Fair Share Act in the Maryland Legislature, with: Delegate Shane Robinson, Maryland’s District 39 (Montgomery County), who was the sponsor of the House version of the Poultry Fair Share Act, which he withdrew; and Senator Richard Colburn, representing District 37 (Caroline, Dorchester, Talbot & Wicomico Counties).

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Sound Bites: Conflicting Views On Meat And GMOs

inmeatwetrustFebruary, 18, 2014 – Segment 3

In a special archive edition, we bring you some of our favorite Sound Bites segments from the past month:

  • The longstanding relationship of Americans and meat, with Dr. Maureen Ogle, historian and author of In Meat We Trust: An Unexpected History of Carnivore America;
  • “The Five Biggest Meat Stories of 2013” with Tom PhilpottMother Jones Food and Agriculture blogger; and
  • Do GMOs matter? with Tom Philpott, Mother Jones Food and Agriculture correspondent; and Nathanael Johnson, food writer for Grist.

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Sound Bites: How The New Farm Bill Impacts SNAP | California Drought and The USA | Chesapeake Bay Moving In The Right Direction?

SNAPFebruary 11, 2014 – Segment 4

We take a look at the Farm Bill, signed by President Obama last week, which cut $8.6 Billion out of the food stamp program, on this week’s edition of Sound Bites. Joining us for the discussion are: Rachel Sheffield, policy analyst in the Devos Center for Religion and Civil Society at the Heritage Foundation; and Michael J. Wilson, Director of Maryland Hunger Solutions.

Then we travel to California to examine the effect of the drought on the food system, with Andrew Freedman, climate reporter for Mashable and former Senior Science Writer for Climate Central.

We close out the show with a roundtable discussion on topics to include the health of the Chesapeake Bay, the lawsuit against the Farm Bureau, and the new Chesapeake Bay Agreement. Our panel of guests include: Gerald Winegrad, attorney and adjunct professor at the University of Maryland School of Public Policy; Brent Bolin, Clean Water Coalition Director at Maryland League of Conservation Voters; and Tim Wheeler, reporter for B’More Green, the Baltimore Sun’s Environmental Blog.

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Sound Bites: Federal Farm Bill Slated To Pass | GMO Labeling Returns To Annapolis Legislative Agenda

Farm BillFebruary 4, 2014 – Segment 4

We discuss and debate of the latest federal Farm Bill, which is slated to pass through Congress today, on the newest installment of Sound Bites. The bill, which would more aptly be named the Food Bill, addresses many parts of our lives that might surprise you. We begin this discussion with a general overview, with: Tim Murphy, a reporter in Mother Jones’ DC bureau. Then we move to a debate on the bill, with:

Do you care whether your food contains Genetically Modified Organisms, or GMOs? There is currently a debate taking place in the Maryland Legislature over whether to label foods as containing GMOs. Joining us to discuss the issue on air are two members of the Maryland State Senate’s Education, Health, and Environmental Affairs Committee: Senator J.B. Jennings, Republican who represents Maryland’s District 7 in Baltimore County and Harford County; and Senator Karen Montgomery, Democrat who represents Maryland’s District 14 in Montgomery County. Senator Montgomery will be sponsoring the bill that would require the labeling of products containing GMOs.

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Sound Bites: St. Brigid | Beginnings of a Delmarva Food Hub | Do GMOs Matter? | ShorePower Project

Food HubJanuary 28, 2014 – Segment 4

We’re talking food and farming, in our newest edition of Sound Bites! February 1 is St. Brigid’s Day – did you know she is the patron saint of cattle? After a brief commentary on this curious saint, we talk about creating a Delmarva Food Hub, with Cleo Braver, owner of Cottingham Farm in Easton, Maryland.

Then, we ask the question: Do GMOs matter? You will hear from: Tom PhilpottMother Jones Food and Agriculture correspondent; and Nathanael Johnson, food writer for Grist.

We close out the show with a look at a project designed to help municipalities on Maryland’s Eastern Shore significantly reduce their energy expenditures, called the ShorePower Project. Here to talk with us about this exciting new initiative is Briggs Cunningham, Energy Programs Manager at the Center For Environment & Society at Washington College.

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Sound Bites: Coalition of Immokalee Workers’ Victory | Marketing “Less Bad Food” To Millenials | Sustainability & The Legacy of George Washington Carver

Coalition of Immokalee WorkersJanuary 21, 2014 – Segment 3

It’s the newest episode in our series about the food we eat, Sound Bites! We begin with Gerardo Reyes Chavez, a leader of the Coalition of Immokalee Workers who has worked in the fields as an agricultural worker since he was 11;  Jon Berger, Mid-Atlantic Coordinator for the Real Food Challenge; and Cassidy Regan, member of the Campaign for Fair Food; about a recent victory for workers in Florida: Walmart has joined the Fair Food Program, a grassroots movement to improve farmworkers’ wages and working conditions.

Next we talk with Jeff Fromm, Executive Vice President at the independent ad agency Barkley and co-author of Marketing to Millennials: Reach the Largest and Most Influential Generation of Consumers Ever. Fromm will talk about what it means to market “less bad” food, and how the Millennial Generation – 31 million of whom are now parents – is paying closer attention to what they eat.

We close out the show with a commemoration of the work of inventor, educator, botanist and scientist George Washington Carver, who was born 150 years ago this month. Our guests are: Shirley Baxter, Tuskegee Institute National Historic Site park ranger; and Dr. Mark Hersey, assistant professor of History at Mississippi State University and author of My Work Is That Of Conservation: An Environmental Biography of George Washington Carver, which situates the agricultural and environmental work of Carver in the context of both the conservation movement of the early twentieth century and the environmental history of Alabama’s Black Belt.

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Sound Bites: Future Harvest: Farming For Profit & Stewardship Conference | GMOs & Cheerios | Maureen Ogle’s “In Meat We Trust”

General Mills' CheeriosJanuary 14, 2014 – Segment 4

In the newest edition of Sound Bites, we get a sneak preview of the 15th Annual Farming for Profit and Stewardship Conference hosted by Future Harvest CASA, which will be held this weekend. Our guests will include: Amanda Behrens, Future Harvest CASA board member and Project Manager with the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future Food Mapping project; Denzel Mitchell, Founder of Five Seeds Farm & Apiary in Baltimore County; and Errol Mattox, who will be serving as a panelist on the conference’s “Founding Farmers” panel.

Then, we turn to GMOs with Nathanael Johnson, who teaches at the University of California, Berkeley and writes about food for the online publication GristAmong other topics, Johnson discusses General Mills’ decision to stop using GMOs in Cheerios.

We close out the show looking at the longstanding relationship of Americans and meat, with Dr. Maureen Ogle, historian and author of In Meat We Trust: An Unexpected History of Carnivore America.

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Sound Bites: Salmonella & Flaws In Poultry Safety System | Food, Ag and Environment Stories to Watch in 2014 | This Year’s Biggest Meat Stories

Top Meat Stories of 2013January 7, 2014 – Segment 4

Are you careful with uncooked poultry? In the newest edition of Sound Bites, we look at a recent study by the Pew Charitable Trusts that highlights weaknesses in the poultry safety system that have led to outbreaks of salmonella. With Sandra Eskin, author of the study and Director, Safe Food Project.

Then, we examine the big issues in the year ahead in Food, Agriculture and the Environment, with our panel of commentators: Jenny Hopkinson, who covers Agriculture and Food Policy issues for POLITICO Pro; Scott Dodd, Editor of OnEarth.org; Tim Wheeler, Reporter for B’More Green, The Baltimore Sun‘s environmental blog; and Tom Horton, Professor of Practice in Environmental Studies at Salisbury University who covered the Environment for The Baltimore Sun for 35 years.

We close out the show with Tom Philpott, Mother Jones Food and Agriculture blogger, who will talk about The Five Biggest Meat Stories of 2013.

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Sound Bites: 30th Anniversary of the Chesapeake Bay Agreement | Water & The Columbia Gas Pipeline | An Amazing Radish

10/17/13 Photo by Timothy B. Wheeler / Baltimore Sun Staff.  Baltimore, Md.  Baltimore City Mark Cameron of the city Office of Sustainability and Stuart S. Schwartz of University of Maryland Baltimore County (in ballcap) examine forage radish plants sprouting in vacant lot in Northeast Baltimore.  Curbing polluted runoff can be daunting in cities with lots of pavement and relatively few green spaces. A researcher with the University of Maryland Baltimore County has sowed forage radishes on a recently cleared vacant lot in East Baltimiore to see if they can serve as natural storm-water controls. Also known as Daikon or Japanese radishes, the plants' giant roots grow deep into the soil. Stuart Schwartz hopes they'll be able to break up hard-packed dirt enough so that it willl soak up rainfall and keep it from washing trash and pollution down the nearest storm drain into the harbor. ORG XMIT: 1144165December 17, 2013 – Segment 3

In 1983 the governors of Maryland, Virginia, Pennsylvania and Delaware, the mayor of Washington, DC, and the administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency signed an agreement outlining a plan to restore the Chesapeake Bay. We begin the hour with a look at the 30th anniversary of the Chesapeake Bay Agreement, with: former Maryland State Senator Gerald W. Winegrad, attorney and Adjunct Professor at the University of Maryland School of Public Policy where he has taught a graduate course on Chesapeake Bay Restoration since 1988; and Dr. Beth McGee, Chesapeake Bay Foundation‘s Senior Water Quality Scientist.

Then, we look at the implications of the controversial Columbia Gas pipeline, which will cut through 21 miles of Baltimore and Harford Counties in Maryland. In-studio to talk about the pipeline will be Gunpowder Riverkeeper Theaux Le Gardeur. To see the narrative map of waterway impacts along the pipeline, click here.

We close out the show with a fascinating look at a new type of radish that can be used to fight storm water runoff. Joining us to talk about this dynamic root vegetable will be Dr. Stuart Schwartz, senior research scientist at the Center for Urban Environmental Research and Education at University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC).

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Sound Bites: Food Insecurity in Maryland, The Richest State in the Nation

realfoodfarm-mobilemarket1December 10, 2013 – Hour 2

In partnership with the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future Food System Map Project, we launch a new feature: Hunger in the Richest State. Why does the richest state in the nation have so many food-insecure people? We hear the stories of individuals from across the state who are struggling to put food on the table – from Cambridge to Baltimore to Western Maryland – and learn about the good work that is being done to address the need.

You will hear from: Michael J. Wilson, Director of Maryland Hunger Solutions, and Amanda Behrens, Project Manager with the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future‘s Food Mapping project, as well as voices from: the Church Street Pantry in Cambridge, MD; the food pantry and produce drop at the Amazing Grace Lutheran Church in Baltimore; the Real Food Farm‘s Mobile Farmers Market in Baltimore; the Maryland Food Bank Western Branch servicing Western Maryland; and the Garrett County Food Resource Day in Oakland, MD.

To see the Story Map, click here.

This segment is a rebroadcast from September 24, 2013.

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Sound Bites: Poultry Fair Share Act | Saving Bees | All About Fermentation

Bees and insecticidesDecember 3, 2013 – Segment 4

On Sound Bites, we discuss the Poultry Fair Share Act, which proposes that large agribusinesses such as Perdue and Tyson be charged a fee per head for chickens grown on the farms contracted with them, to invest in the health of the Chesapeake Bay. Our guests will include: Representative Michael McDermott, Republican member of the Maryland House of Delegates representing District 38B; and Scott Edwards, Co-Director of Food and Water Watch‘s Food and Water Justice Project.

Then, we return to the topic of bees and pesticides, in light of today’s New York Times full-page ad advocating for passing of the “Saving America’s Pollinators Act.” Our guest will be Jay Feldman, Executive Director and co-Founder of Beyond Pesticides.

We close Sound Bites with Sandor Ellix Katz, a fermentation revivalist and author of Wild Fermentation, The Revolution Will Not Be Microwaved, and The Art of Fermentation. Katz will talk about the history and benefits of fermentation, and share a fermented recipe with us!

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Sound Bites: History of Ag Policy Since 1980s | Controversy Surrounding Fracking | Recipe: BlackSauce Kitchen’s Short Ribs

BlackSauce KitchenNovember 26, 2013 – Hour 2

On this week’s episode of Sound Bites, we begin the hour with a segment of our interview with Wenonah Hauter, Executive Director of Food and Water Watch and author of Foodopoly: The Battle Over the Future of Food and Farming in America. Hauter discusses the history of agricultural policy in the United States since the 1980s.

Then, we turn to the controversy surrounding fracking, a means of extracting natural gas underground. We talk to science writer Elizabeth Royte, who discusses how farm animals can provide early warning indicators of possible health risks related to fracking. Focusing locally, we debate Maryland’s proposed moratorium on fracking with: Mike Tidwell, Director of Chesapeake Climate Action Network; Mitch Jones, Director of the Common Resources Program at Food and Water Watch; and Steve Everley, spokesperson for Energy in Depth, a Washington-based advocacy group established by the Independent Petroleum Association of America.

We close out this week’s episode of Sound Bites with a brand new recipe from Damian Mosley of BlackSauce Kitchen, who shares a recipe for short ribs – great in this chilly weather!

Parts 1 and 2 of this episode of Sound Bites were originally aired February 14, 2013.

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Sound Bites: MDA Pulls Phosphorus Management Regs | Whitelock Community Farm Expands | Recipe: Sweet Potato Biscuits From Blacksauce

Whitelock Community Farm in Reservoir HillNovember 19, 2013 – Segment 3

This week on Sound Bites, we begin with a follow-up to the announcement last Friday that the Maryland Department of Agriculture (MDA) has withdrawn proposed phosphorus management regulations. Phosphorus is a major contributor to pollution in the Chesapeake Bay. The regulations would control when and how farmers could apply manure to their crops. The regulations were withdrawn after hundreds of farmers, at public meetings, protested their implementation. Guests include:

Then, we return to Whitelock Community Farm in Baltimore’s Reservoir Hill neighborhood. We will take a look at what is current being produced on this street corner farm and at their new initiative to expand onto a lot across the street from their current location. They will hold an event this weekend to raise funds for this initiative. Our guests will be: Victoria Day, Reservoir Hill community member; and Alison Worman, Farm Manager at Whitelock Community Farm.

We close out the show with a Thanksgiving recipe from Damian Mosley of Blacksauce Kitchen! He tells us how to make sweet potato biscuits.

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Sound Bites: Food Safety Modernization Act | GMOs & Public Opinion | Black Farmers and Urban Gardeners Conference

GMO measure in Washington stateNovember 12, 2013 – Segment 3

We begin the newest episode of our series on the food system, Sound Bites, talking about the Food Safety Modernization Act and what it means for small farmers, with Michael Tabor, a farmer who supplies Baltimore-area universities with GMO-free, sustainably-grown produce and has run a farm stand in the Adams Morgan neighborhood in Washington for 40 years. He wrote the widely-circulated piece, “Food Safety Modernization Act Threatens Fresh, Health and Sustainably-Grown Food.”

Then, we talk with Erin Sagen, member of the Online Editorial Team for YES! Magazine, about GMOs and how public opinion shifts after pro-GMO money pours into a community.

We close the show with a report back from the Black Farmers and Urban Gardeners conference that took place this past weekend in New York City, with Imani Bryant, who is working on a Masters of Public Health from Morgan State University and specializes in food justice issues; and Xavier Brown, Director of Urban Agriculture for The Green Scheme, a DC nonprofit organization that aims to educate people of diverse cultural backgrounds about their role in the environmental movement.

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Sound Bites: Real Food Comes To Hopkins | Political Food News Roundup | Recipe From Afroculinaria

Real Food ChallengeNovember 5, 2013 – Segment 4

On the newest episode of Sound Bites. we report an exciting development in the real food movement that took place last week right here in Baltimore. Johns Hopkins University President Ronald Daniels signed the Real Food Challenge Commitment and, by doing so, Hopkins agreed that by the year 2020, 20% of the food served in their dining halls will be locally grown, humanely raised, and ecologically sound. Our guests include:

  • Raychel Santo, Senior majoring in Public Health Studies and Global Environmental Change and Sustainability, and the co-founder and co-president of Real Food Hopkins;
  • Jon Berger, Mid-Atlantic Regional Coordinator for the Real Food Challenge;
  • and Bill Connor, Director of Dining Programs at Hopkins.

Then, we have a political food news roundup with Jenny Hopkinson, who covers agriculture and food policy issues for POLITICO Pro and writes Morning Agriculture.

We close out the show with a special recipe and commentary from MIchael Twitty, Culinary Historian of African and African American Foodways and blogger at Afroculinaria.

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Sound Bites: Black Farmers Lawsuit, Spying Grocery Shelves, And Gleaning With Gather Baltimore

Gather BaltimoreOctober 30, 2013 – Segment 4

It’s the latest episode of Sound Bites! We begin the show with an update on the settlement in the Black Farmers Discrimination Litigation, commonly called Pigford II, class action lawsuit, which charged that USDA’s Farm Service Agency offices discriminated against Black farmers, denying them farm loans. After waiting as long as 14 years, some of the plaintiffs have been awarded $50,000 apiece as settlement of their claims. Nevertheless, the case is still fraught with controversy. Our guests will be: Willard Tillman, Director, Oklahoma Black Historical Research Project; and John Zippert, Director of Program Operations, Federation of Southern Cooperatives/Land Assistance Fund.

At 10:30 we take a look at Mondelez International, whose properties include Chips Ahoy, Nabisco, Ritz and other high-profile snack brands. Mondelez says it’s planning to debut a grocery shelf in 2015 that comes equipped with sensors to determine the age and sex of passing customers. Joining us to talk about the implications of this technology will be: Brian Fung, Washington Post technology reporter; and Von Diaz, Colorlines reporter and multimedia producer, as well as editor for Feet in Two Worlds, which brings the work of immigrant and ethnic media journalists from communities across the U.S. to public radio and the Web.

At 10:45, let’s go gleaning!! Steiner Show producers Stefanie Mavronis and Mark Gunnery joined Gather Baltimore and Movable Feast this past weekend at Zahradka Farm in southeast Baltimore County, where they helped glean produce in fields that had already been picked through, gathering fresh vegetables for distribution to people with limited access to fresh food in Baltimore City. You will hear from: OSI-Baltimore Community Fellow Arthur Morgan, who founded Gather Baltimore to collect and glean fresh produce to give to people with limited healthy food access; volunteers from Movable Feast, a program that provides nutritious meals and other services at no cost to people who are sick and need support; and farmer George Zahradka III.

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Sound Bites: Food Stamp Challenge | What’s In That Chicken Nugget? | Local Turkeys For Thanksgiving

Chicken nuggetsOctober 22, 2013 – Segment 3

We look at Maryland Hunger Solution’s Food Stamp Challenge, on the latest edition of Sound Bites! We will talk with participants in the Challenge, includingLisa Klingenmaier, Anti-Hunger Program Associate with Maryland Hunger Solutions; and Cheryl Kagan, former member of the MD House of Delegates.

Next we hear from Tom Philpott, Food and Agriculture blogger for Mother Jones, on his article, “40 Percent of Your Chicken Nugget is Meat. The Rest is …”

We close out the show with Thanksgiving turkeys! Farm Alliance member Elisa Lane of Two Boots Farm in Hampstead, Maryland, and Steve Martinez of Pluma Feliz Farm in Sparks, MD, have partnered together to raise Thanksgiving turkeys.

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Sound Bites – Michael Moss on Salt Sugar Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us

Michael Moss, author of Salt Sugar FatOctober 15, 2013 – Hour 2

This week is the WEAA Fall Membership Drive, so tune in for compelling topics and wonderful premiums! Now is your opportunity to support the station you have come to love: WEAA, THE Voice of the Community. Call 410-319-8888 or visit weaa.org to make your pledge of support during the show.

In the latest episode of Sound Bites, we look at how “Big Food” has lured us into eating high-fat, low-nutrition foods over the past century, when Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter Michael Moss joins us to discuss his book Salt Sugar Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us.

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Sound Bites: Government Shutdown’s Impact on Food | Arsenic in Animal Feed | Trans-Pacific Partnership & Food Safety

The impacts of the government shutdown on foodOctober 8, 2013 – Segment 3

We will discuss how the government shutdown is affecting food and agriculture on the latest edition of Sound BitesTim Murphy, a reporter in Mother Jones‘ DC bureau, and Michael J. Wilson, Director of Maryland Hunger Solutions, will join us in this discussion.

Then we move into a discussion about new restrictions on arsenic in animal feed with Keeve Nachman, Director of the Center for a Livable Future‘s Farming for the Future Program and co-author of a report on arsenic-based drugs used in chickens.

Finally, we turn to a massive free trade agreement called the Trans-Pacific Partnership, or TPP, and examine how its implementation may affect food safety. Our guests include: Daren Bakst, Research Fellow in Agricultural Policy for the Heritage Foundation; and Mitch Jones, Director of the Common Resources Program at Food and Water Watch.

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Sound Bites: SNAP And Monsanto

SNAPOctober 1, 2013 – Segment 2

It’s a brand new episode of Sound Bites. We start by examining the major cuts to SNAP benefits in the House’s version of the Farm Bill. Guests include: Robert Paarlberg, the Betty Freyhof Johnson Professor of Political Science at Wellesley College and researcher on food and agricultural policy; Triada Stampas, Senior Director of Government Relations at the Food Bank for New York City; and Rachel Sheffield, Policy Analyst at the DeVos Center for Religion and Civil Society at the Heritage Foundation.

Then we turn our attention to a legislative provision that had been protecting Monsanto by allowing biotechnology companies to continue selling genetically-modified seeds even after a court had blocked their sale over safety concerns. The Farmers Assurance Provision, or “Monsanto Protection Act,” was removed last week from the Senate version of the spending bill when Senators Barbara Mikulski (D-MD) and Jeff Merkley (D-OR) led a successful charge to have the protectionist language removed. Discussing this new development will be: Colin O’Neil from the Center for Food Safety; and Thomas Parker of the Redick Global Environmental Ethics Counsel, LLC.


Sound Bites: Hunger In The Richest State – Exploring Food Insecurity In Maryland

Hunger in the Richest StateSeptember 24, 2013 – Hour 2

In partnership with the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future Food System Map Project, we launch a new feature: Hunger in the Richest State. Why does the richest state in the nation have so many food-insecure people? We hear the stories of individuals from across the state who are struggling to put food on the table – from Cambridge to Baltimore to Western Maryland – and learn about the good work that is being done to address the need.

You will hear from: Michael J. Wilson, Director of Maryland Hunger Solutions, and Amanda Behrens, Project Manager with the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future‘s Food Mapping project, as well as voices from: the Church Street Pantry in Cambridge, MD; the food pantry and produce drop at the Amazing Grace Lutheran Church in Baltimore; the Real Food Farm‘s Mobile Farmers Market in Baltimore; the Maryland Food Bank Western Branch servicing Western Maryland; and the Garrett County Food Resource Day in Oakland, MD.

To see the Story Map, click here.

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Sound Bites: Chicken Litter, Coffee, And Pasta

CafoSeptember 17, 2013 – Segment 2

It’s a new episode of Sound Bites, our weekly segment on the future of the food system. This week, we discuss Maryland’s decision to delay the implementation of new regulations on phosphorus and the use of chicken manure as fertilizerWe’re joined by Assateague Coastkeeper Kathy Phillips; Royden Powell, Assistant Secretary for Resource Conservation for the Maryland Department of Agriculture; Doug Myers, Maryland Scientist at Chesapeake Bay Foundation; and Kevin Anderson, President of the Maryland Grain Producers Association and grain farmer at Wimberly Farms, Princess Anne, Maryland.
Then Casey McKeel joins us to speak about Thread Coffee, a collectively owned and operated small-batch coffee roaster committed to a transparent model of trade that promotes dignity, sustainability, and solidarity. Casey will tell us more about the cooperative and its mission, and their new community supported coffee program.

Finally, we conclude with a recipe for spaghetti aglio e olio from UMBC senior and culinary aficionado Sam Levin. This recipe is a simple, yet refreshing take on pasta.

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Sound Bites: Hudson/Waterkeeper Case | No-Till Farming

ChickensSeptember 3, 2013 – Segment 2

This week on Sound Bites, we look at the latest update on Waterkeeper Alliance, Inc. v. Alan and Kristin Hudson Farm and Perdue Farms, Inc., — a case that could have deep and long-term effects on all of us, as it addressed the question of who is held responsible for polluting our waterways (in this case, farm runoff) under the Federal Clean Water Act. A federal judge ruled last week that the Hudson Family and Perdue will not be able to recoup the cost of legal fees incurred during their legal battle with the Waterkeeper Alliance.

Our guests are: Scott Edwards, co-Director of the Food and Water Justice Project at Food and Water Watch and former attorney for the Waterkeeper Alliance; and George Ritchie, attorney for the Hudson family.

We close out the show with a conversation on no-till farming, with Tom Philpott, Food and Agriculture Blogger for Mother Jones, and organic grain farmer Bill Mason.

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Sound Bites: Future Harvest/CASA’s Beginner Farmer Trainer Program

Future Harvest Beginner Farmer TrainingAugust 27, 2013 – Segment 3

Stay tuned for the latest edition of Sound Bites! Have you ever thought about starting your own farm? This week our topic is new farmers and Future Harvest/CASA’s (Chesapeake Alliance for Sustainable Agriculture) Beginner Farmer Trainer Program. We talk to:

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Sound Bites: Poultry Farmers | Chicken Waste As Alternative Energy Source?

Steve Martinez of Pluma Feliz FarmsAugust 20, 2013 – Hour 2

On the newest edition of Sound Bites, we’re talking chickens! A diverse group of poultry farmers speak candidly about their work. Guests include: Carole Morrison of Bird’s Eye View Farm in Pokomoke City; Ted Wycall, third generation farmer at Greenbranch Farm in Salisbury, MD; and Steve Martinez of Pluma Feliz Farms in Baltimore County.

Then we close the show with Tom Horton, professor of Practice in Environmental Studies at Salisbury University and former Baltimore Sun environmental reporter, and Michele Merkel, co-Director of the Food and Water Justice Project at Food & Water Watch, who will talk about a plan for which Maryland Attorney General and gubernatorial candidate Doug Gansler has recently expressed public support: burning chicken litter as an alternative source of energy.

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Sound Bites: Rural MD Needs Immigration Reform | Update: Gather Baltimore | Why Bees Are Dying

Why Bees Are DyingAugust 13, 2013 – Segment 4

It’s another episode of Sound Bites. We start by talking to Lucie L. Snodgrass, Maryland state executive director of the USDA’s Farm Service Agency about an op-ed she wrote for The Baltimore Sun titled, “Rural Maryland needs immigration reform.”

Later in the hour, current OSI-Baltimore Community Fellow Arthur Morgan gives us an update on his project Gather Baltimore, a volunteer-based program that collects and gleans fresh produce donated by farmer’s markets and farms for distribution to people with limited access to healthy food in Baltimore. He talks about a few upcoming events and initiatives.

Then, we discuss a new study done by the University of Maryland and the US Department of Agriculture that points to why large numbers of bees are dying. Scientists identified a mixture of pesticides and fungicides that contaminate pollen and subsequently kill bees. Joining us are:

  • Dr. Jeff Pettis, Research Leader in the Bee Research Laboratory for the Agricultural Research Service at the U.S. Department of Agriculture who co-authored the report;
  • Steve McDaniel, certified master beekeeper and past President of the Maryland State Beekeepers Association;
  • and Meme Thomas, director of Baltimore Honey, a nonprofit that works to maximize local honeybee pollination coverage for local food security.

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Sound Bites: 50 Million Hungry In Richest Country | Are America’s Food Debates Just White Men Talking?

Urban Farm (Image via Salon)August 6, 2013 – Segment 3

We start this week on Sound Bites by talking to Rose Aguilar, host of Your Call on KALW in San Francisco, who provides a commentary related to her recent Al Jazeera op-ed, “Richest country’s empty plates: Fifty million people in the United States go to bed hungry.”

Then, we look at an article that appeared onSalon.com last week, called, “America’s food debates are just white men talking,” by fitness, nutrition, and body-image blogger Ericka Nicole Kendall. We will discuss race, class, and the food movement with a diverse roundtable of guests, including:

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Sound Bites: Warehouse-Raised Fish | McDonald’s & Fast Food Workers | Farmer Profile: Charles Wright

A Baltimore lab aims to take the science of growing clean, healthy salt-water fish to the global marketplaceJuly 30, 2013 – Hour 2

On a new edition of Sound Bites, we ask the question: as our waterways become more polluted, will fish be raised in warehouses in our citiesVan Smith, senior staff writer for the Baltimore City Paper, and Dr. Yonathan Zohar, professor and chair of the Department of Marine Biotechnology and head of the Aquaculture Research Center at the Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology at UMBC, join us to discuss the future of fish.

Then Mother Jones food and agriculture blogger Tom Philpott joins us to talk about the latest on McDonalds and fast food workers. He also shares a recipe for gazpacho, a cold, refreshing, tomato-based soup.

We conclude Sound Bites with a profile of an Eastern Shore man who is still farming the land that has been in his family for generations: Charles Wright, owner of Wright’s Market and Cornerstone Farms.

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Sound Bites: Urban Farming, No SNAP Benefits For Violent Offenders, & A Fermentation Recipe

Sandor Katz, FermentationJuly 23, 2013 – Segment 3

It’s another live episode of Sound Bites!

Denzel Mitchell, founder of Five Seeds Farm & Apiary; Blain  and Reagan Hooton, farmer at the Baltimore Free Farm, join us to talk about urban farming.

Then, we debate the Senate’s amendments to the Farm Bill, which would block SNAP benefits for life to those recipients who have at any time been convicted of one of a Senate-designated list of violent crimes, with Tad DeHaven, state and federal budget analyst for the Cato Institute, and Brentin Mock, New Orleans-based journalist and reporter for Colorlines.

We end this week’s Sound Bites with Sandor Ellix Katz, who shares a fermentation recipe. He is a fermentation revivalist and author of Wild FermentationThe Revolution Will Not Be Microwaved, and The Art of Fermentation.

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Sound Bites: MD Pesticide Reporting Work Group | Recipe: Kale Smoothies | Malik Yakini On Racism In The Food System

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July 16, 2013 – Hour 2

It’s another episode of Sound Bites! We begin the hour talking with two members of the Maryland Pesticide Reporting and Information Work Group who hold very different perspectives: DelCharles Otto, Maryland State Delegate representing District 38A, Somerset & Wicomico Counties; and Andy Fellows, Chesapeake Regional Director of Clean Water Action.

Next we share a recipe for delicious and healthy kale smoothies, from Adahmh Roland, a folk singer who runs the Tin Can Singing Telegram Service.

We close this episode of Sound Bites with Malik Yakini, Executive Director of the Detroit Black Community Food Security Network and founder of D-Town Farm, an urban farm in Detroit. We discuss racism in the food system and the food movement, as well as Yakini’s work fighting for social justice, food equity, and food security for the people of Detroit.

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Sound Bites: Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership | Nutrient Trading & The Chesapeake Bay | A Kayak Trip Through The Delmarva Peninsula

Tom Horton, Delmarva PeninsulaJuly 9, 2013 – Segment 3

On a new episode of Sound Bites, we discuss what the newly-negotiated Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) with the European Union might mean for food, agriculture, and the environment. With: Simon Lester, trade policy analyst at the Herbert A. Stiefel Center for Trade Policy Studies at the CATO Institute; and Katherine Paul, Associate Director of the Organic Consumers Association.

Later in the episode we discuss nutrient trading – the buying and selling of nitrogen and phosphorus “credits” to offset new or increased pollution discharges – and what a Bay-wide nutrient trading program could mean for the health of the Chesapeake Bay. Our guest will be Scott Edwards, co-Director of the Food and Water Justice Project at Food and Water Watch.

We conclude this week’s Sound Bites by taking a look at the Delmarva peninsula with Tom Horton, Professor of Practice in Environmental Studies at Salisbury University who covered the environment for the Baltimore Sun for 35 years, and Bill Nelson, Lecturer in Environmental Studies at Salisbury University. They recently returned from a month-long kayak trip around Delmarva with a group of students from the university, and they join us to discuss the region’s length and breadth, its edges and interiors, and its people and critters.

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Sound Bites: Michael Twitty On Paula Deen | Supreme Court & Sustainable Development | Slave Labor Processing Shrimp | Farm Alliance Of Baltimore City

Michael Twitty, AfroculinariaJuly 2, 2013 – Segment 3

We reflect on Paula Deen and southern cuisine, in the latest episode of Sound BitesMichael Twitty, Culinary Historian of African and African American Foodways and blogger at Afroculinaria, joins us in-studio.

Next John Echeverria, Professor of Law and Acting Director of the Environmental Law Center at the Vermont Law School, discusses his New York Times Op-Ed, “A Legal Blow to Sustainable Development,” which details possible dire environmental consequences as a result of another of last week’s Supreme Court decisions.

Then, Mother Jones food and agricultural blogger Tom Philpott discusses his recent piece that touches on the international food system called, “Did a Slave Process the Shrimp in Your Scampi?

We conclude Sound Bites with a visit to the Waverly Farmers Market in Baltimore to speak with members of the Farm Alliance of Baltimore Citya network of producers working to increase the viability of urban farming and improve access to urban grown foods.

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Sound Bites: Farm Bill Fails | Obesity A Disease? | Shad Dwindling In MD | Recipe: Gluten-Free Strawberry Cupcakes

ShadJune 25, 2013 – Hour 2

On another live episode of Sound Bites we continue our discussion of the Farm Bill, which the House of Representatives failed to pass last week. Joining us will be: Patty Lovera, Assistant Director of Food & Water Watch, where she coordinates the Food Team; Justin King, Federal Policy Liaison of the Asset Building Program for the New America Foundation; and Robert L. Paarlberg, Betty Freyhof Johnson ’44 Professor of Political Science at Wellesley College and researcher on food and agricultural policy.

Last week the American Medical Association reclassified obesity as a disease. Michael Moss, Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter for The New York Times and author of Salt Sugar Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us, joins us to talk about the implications of that new classification.

Next, Baltimore Sun environmental reporter Tim Wheeler joins us to talk about the dwindling shad populations in Maryland.

We end this week’s episode with a seasonal recipe for gluten-free strawberry cupcakes, from The Baltimore Blend’s Carla Wills. Yumm!

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Sound Bites: What This Farm Bill Means | Baltimore Free Farm | Union Graze Market | Recipe: Spaghetti Aglio e Olio

June 18, 2013 – Segment 5

Baltimore Free Farm

This week we continue our dialogue on the Farm Bill, which has been passed in the Senate but is still under debate in the House. We discuss how this Farm Bill is different from Farm Bills of the past, and what this means for the future of agriculture and food. Our panelists include: Rebecca Klein, Public Health & Agriculture Policy Project Director for the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future; Erroll Mattox, Small Farm Management Agent in the School of Agricultural and Natural Sciences at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore; and Mark Hertsgaard, fellow of the New America Foundation, and author, most recently, of Hot: Living Through the Next Fifty Years on Earth.

Next we turn our attention to Baltimore. The Baltimore Free Farm, an urban farm in Hampden, is fighting the city of Baltimore for putting up for sale two of the lots the Free Farm has cleared and maintained for the past two years. The Free Farm argues that they should be able to keep the lots because they have provided hundreds of pounds of food for the community at no cost, among other reasons. We will hear from Billy Thomas, organizing committee member and farmer at the Baltimore Free Farm, and Jon Smeton, Johns Hopkins Community Impact Intern for the Baltimore Free Farm.

Our next stop is Union Graze, Baltimore’s newest farmer’s market! We will hear from various voices in that market, which is in the Clipper Mill neighborhood.

We conclude with a recipe for a simple and refreshing take on pasta: spaghetti aglio e oio, from UMBC senior and culinary aficionado Sam Levin! 

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Sound Bites: Farmer’s Roundtable; Brickyard Educational Farm Update; Recipe: Garlic Scapes; The Gaza Kitchen

Garlic scapesJune 11, 2013 – Hour 2

It’s another live episode of Sound Bites, our weekly show exploring the future of the food system. Charles Wright, owner of the Wright Family Farm in Wicomico County, MD, and Ted Wycall, third generation farmer at Greenbranch Farm in Salisbury, MD, join us for a farmer’s roundtable.

Then, we hear an update on Brickyard Educational Farm in Montgomery County, MD, from Sophia Maravell, Education Coordinator at the Farm.

We close out Sound Bites with one of our favorite segments: a weekly recipe! This week, Kristen Carbone of Radix Farm in Upper Marlboro, MD, shares her recipe for garlic scapes, using the “flower stalks” of hardneck garlic plants.

We end the show with Laila El-Haddad and Maggie Schmitt, authors of The Gaza Kitchen: A Palestinian Culinary Journey, who join us from Dar al-Taqwa Islamic Center in Ellicott City to talk about their new cookbook. With 120 kitchen-tested recipes and documentary photography, the authors provide rare insight into Gaza’s culture and cuisine, revealing how conflict and siege play out in the daily lives of ordinary people. Part cookbook, part political analysis, part history, this award-winning book will open your eyes to Gaza like never before.

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Sound Bites: Does Report On Arsenic & Chicken Matter?; Monsanto Watch; And Langston Hughes’ “Freedom’s Plow”

monsanto-wheatJune 4, 2013 – Segment 4

We kick-off another live episode of Sound Bites with a debate over the Johns Hopkins University study on arsenicals in chicken and their longterm effects on our health. With: Patty Lovera, Assistant Director of Food & Water Watch; and Tom Super, Director of Communications for the National Chicken Council.

Then, we turn to Monsanto. Tom Laskawy, food and ag writer for Grist and Executive Director of the Food and Environment Reporting Network, will discuss a piece he wrote on new evidence suggesting Monsanto’s popular herbicide RoundUp might lead to adverse long-term health effects in people. Then Tom Philpott, food and ag blogger for MotherJones, talks about his recent articles on Monsanto’s ally in the State Department and their never-commercialized GM wheat that’s sprouting up in Oregon.

We close Sound Bites this week with Blain Snipstal, farm manager at Five Seeds Farm & Apiary, who will read a Langston Hughes poem that highlights the importance of African Americans in agriculture and farming.

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Sound Bites: Urban Farming, No SNAP Benefits For Violent Offenders, & A Fermentation Recipe!

Sandor Katz, FermentationMay 28, 2013 – Hour 2

It’s another live episode of Sound Bites!

Denzel Mitchell, founder of Five Seeds Farm & Apiary; Blain  and Reagan Hooton, farmer at the Baltimore Free Farm, join us to talk about urban farming.

Then, we debate the Senate’s amendments to the Farm Bill, which would block SNAP benefits for life to those recipients who have at any time been convicted of one of a Senate-designated list of violent crimes, with Tad DeHaven, state and federal budget analyst for the Cato Institute, and Brentin Mock, New Orleans-based journalist and reporter for Colorlines.

We end this week’s Sound Bites with Sandor Ellix Katz, who shares a fermentation recipe. He is a fermentation revivalist and author of Wild Fermentation, The Revolution Will Not Be Microwaved, and The Art of Fermentation.

 

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Sound Bites: Arsenic In Our Chicken; Supreme Court’s Monsanto Ruling; Bay Oysters; and Salt Sugar Fat

Michael Moss' Salt Sugar FatMay 22, 2013 – Hour 1

This week on Sound Bites, we begin with Dr. Keeve Nachman, Director of the Center for a Livable Future‘s Farming for the Future program, who joins us to talk about a scientific study he co-authored on arsenic in chicken feed.

Then, New York Times Supreme Court correspondent Adam Liptak discusses last week’s Supreme Court decision in which the court ruled unanimously in favor of Monsanto, stating that an Indiana farmer violated Monsanto’s patent on genetically modified soybeans when he culled some from a grain elevator and used them to replant his own crop in future years.

Next you hear from Tim Wheeler, reporter for B’more Green, the Baltimore Sun‘s environmental blog, who will discuss oyster restoration projects in the Chesapeake Bay.

We close out the first hour with Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Michael Moss, investigative reporter for the New York Times, who joins us to talk about his new book, Salt Sugar Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us.

**Due to technical circumstances, the podcast for this show is unavailable.**


Sound Bites: African American Farmers, Dwindling Bee Populations, And Gather Baltimore

denzelMay 15, 2013 – Segment 1

We launch our first live episode of Sound Bites!  We kick-off the show with Denzel Mitchell and Blain Snipstal of Five Seeds Farms and Apiary, who will talk about African American farmers in the US today.

Then we turn to the plight of the insects that bring us our food – the bees! We discuss reports that bee populations are dwindling, with: Meme Thomas, Director of Baltimore Honey, a nonprofit with a goal to maximize local honeybee pollination coverage for local food security; and Maryland State Apiarist Jerry Fischer.

We close out Sound Bites with Open Society Institute Fellow Arthur Morgan, who discusses Gather Baltimore, a program he created as a solution to help end hunger in Baltimore. Gather Baltimore collects fresh produce donated by farmers markets and farms and helps distribute it to people who don’t have access to healthy food sources, through local hospitals, meal programs, and faith communities. To support Arthur’s project, visit Gather Baltimore’s GiveCorps campaign. To volunteer, get in touch with Gather Baltimore on Facebook.

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Sound Bites: How environmental and agricultural legislation affects the economic and ecological health of the Delmarva peninsula

ag and greenMay 9, 2013 – Segment 2

We have a new episode of Sound Bites. We spoke with different environmentalists, farmers, and public officials about how environmental and agricultural legislation affects the economic and ecological health of the Delmarva peninsula.  Then we spoke with Kathy Phillips, the Assateague Coastkeeper, an on-the-water advocate who patrols and protects the Maryland and Northern Virginia Eastern Shore coastal bays; Royden Powell III, Assistant Secretary for Resource Conservation at the Maryland Department of Agriculture; Lee Richardson, a poultry, soy, and corn farmer from Willards, Maryland; and Dave Wilson, Executive Director of the Maryland Coastal Bays Program.

Then, we discuss new laws, called either “Farm Animal Protection Laws” or “Ag Gag Laws” depending on who you ask, which criminalize whistle-blowing at factory farms. Do these laws stifle journalists trying to expose cruel conditions? Are they necessary to protect farmers from people who want to shut them down? We’ll hear two very different opinions on these laws from Will Potter, a journalist who focuses on animal rights, environmental movements, and civil liberties and author of Green Is The New Red: An Insider’s Account of a Social Movement Under Siege; and Emily Meredith, Communications Director for the Animal Agricultural Alliance.

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Sound Bites: Malik Yakini And Labeling Genetically Engineered Foods

MalikYakiniMay 2, 2013

It’s a new episode of Sound Bites. First, we speak with Malik Yakini, Executive Director of the Detroit Black Community Food Security Network and founder of D-Town Farm, an urban farm in Detroit. We discuss racism in the food system and the food movement, as well as his work fighting for social justice, food equity, and food security for the people of Detroit.
At 6:30, Sound Bites continues with a debate over recently proposed federal legislation which would mandate the labeling of genetically engineered foods. We’ll hear a debate between Patty Lovera, Assistant Director of Food and Water Watch, and Thomas Redick, Principal at The Global Environmental Ethics Counsel, a law practice addressing product liability prevention, where he represents the US Soybean Export Council and the United Soybean Board, and co-editor of Thwarting Consumer Choice: The Case Against Mandatory Labeling for Genetically Modified Foods.

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Sound Bites: Agricultural Policy, Transforming the Food System, and a Seasonal Pumpkin Recipe

Real food challengeApril 18, 2013 – Segment 3

This week, we continue our conversation with Food and Water Watch Executive Director and author of Foodopoly: The Battle Over the Future of Food and Farming in America, Wenonah Hauter. She discusses the deregulation and consolidation of the food industry, and how it affects the way we eat.

Then we listen back to a panel discussion at Breaking Ground, the Real Food Challenge’s second national summit, which was held last weekend at Johns Hopkins University. The roundtable discussion brought together cafeteria workers, student activists, farmers, food distributors, and institutional leaders to explore the ways that they’re changing the food system. We are joined by:

Then, vegan and raw food chef Skai Davis shares a seasonal pumpkin recipe with us.

(This episode is a rebroadcast from February 21, 2013)


Sound Bites: Monsanto Rider, Food & Ag News, Alternatives To The GDP

Monsanto RiderApril 4, 2013 – Segment 3

It’s a new episode of Sound Bites. We debate the Monsanto Rider, which caused a storm when it was anonymously inserted into the Agricultural Appropriations Bill passed by Congress. Talking about what this means are: Steve Savage, agricultural technology consultant and blogger at Applied Mythology; Colin O’Neil, Director of Government Affairs for the Center for Food Safety; and Greg Jaffe, Director of Biotechnology for the Center for Science in the Public Interest.

Then, we hear the latest food and agricultural news impacting our region and nation from Patty Lovera, Assistant Director of Food and Water Watch. We close with Mitch Jones, Director of the Common Resources Program at Food and Water Watch, who shares his ideas for alternative ways of measuring an economy beyond the GDP. We explore what that means for our world’s environmental resources. To see the report that Mitch wrote, entitled “Don’t Bet on Wall Street: The Financialization of Nature and the Risk to Our Common Resources,” read more here.

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Sound Bites: Ag Certainty, What the Pesticide Information Act Means for Maryland & A Palestinian Easter Recipe

The Gaza KitchenMarch 28, 2013 – Segment 3

This week on Sound Bites, we talk about the Ag Certainty Bill and the Pesticide Information Act, both of which are making their way through the General Assembly in Maryland right now, and both which could have a serious impact on our region either way they go. First, we talk to Tim Wheeler, writer for B’More GreenThe Baltimore Sun‘s blog on the environment and agriculture, about one of the things he has been writing about: the Ag Certainty Bill.

The Ag Certainty Bill has our region’s environmental groups split. Many have expressed their opposition for the bill, while others have come down in support of its provisions. To get a sense of this divide, we talk to Kim Coble, Vice President for Environmental Protection and Restoration for the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, and Josh Tulkin, State Director for the Sierra Club Maryland Chapter.

We turn our attention now to the Pesticide Information Act (SB675 and HB775), a bill that could require farmers and pesticide applicators to submit information about the pesticides they apply to the Maryland Department of Agriculture. Delegate Cathleen M. Vitale of District 33A in Anne Arundel County and Delegate Stephen Lafferty of District 42 in Baltimore County join us to talk about what’s happening with the bill in Annapolis and where they stand on this piece of legislation. We will continue following the Pesticide Information Act until the end of session.

Now, for the part of Sound Bites that’s quickly becoming your favorite – we bring you a recipe just in time for Easter. One of my producers, Mary Gunnery, visited Laila El-Haddad in her kitchen in Columbia, MD. She is the co-author of The Gaza Kitchen: A Palestinian Culinary Journey, a great new cookbook that shares traditional Palestinian recipes.

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Sound Bites: Farmer’s Markets, Race, & Food Access In Our Region And Beyond, Plus A Unique Passover Recipe

Arthur Morgan's Gather Baltimore - Food Stand In Baltimore's Oliver Neighborhood

Arthur Morgan’s Gather Baltimore – Food Stand In Baltimore’s Oliver Neighborhood

March 21, 2013 – Segment 3

It’s a new episode of Sound Bites. We look at farmers markets in Maryland and beyond. We’ll hear from Alison Hope Alkon, Professor of Sociology at the University of the Pacific and author of Black, White, and Green: Farmers Markets, Race, and the Green Economy.

We’ll also hear from Anne Palmer, the Eating for the Future program director for Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future.

Visitors to the 32nd Street Farmers Market in Waverly talk to us about why farmers markets are important to them, including Arthur Morgan, a current OSI-Baltimore fellow working on a project called Gather Baltimore that puts unused food that would otherwise be wasted or disposed of into the hands of communities and organizations that need it. For those interested in supporting his cause, Arthur is looking for donations to help finance the refrigerated truck he uses to transport food, and is always looking for volunteers.

And finally, culinary historian Michael Twitty gives us a unique Passover recipe that fuses African-American and Jewish traditions.

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Sound Bites: Shirley Sherrod, a St. Patrick’s Day Recipe and More!

Shirley Sherrod, The Courage to Hope

March 14, 2013 – Segment 3

This week on Sound Bites, we start with a conversation about the poor working conditions in America’s restaurant industry, with activist, author, and professor Saru Jayaraman. Jayaraman’s new book, Behind The Kitchen Door, asks how restaurant workers survive on some of the lowest wages in America and investigates how this fact impacts the food arriving at our tables.

Then, Shirley Sherrod, former US Department of Agriculture official and author of The Courage To Hope: How I Stood Up to the Politics of Fear, shares her experience growing up in the segregated South and fighting for farmer’s rights.

Next Tom PhilpottMother Jones Food and Agriculture Blogger, talks to us about two recent studies: one on sugar and one on the Mediterranean diet. Could the amount of sugar a nation consumes per-capita drive instances of diabetes?

We end the show with a traditional Irish recipe in honor of St. Patrick’s Day from Liam Flynn, owner of Liam Flynn’s Ale House on North Avenue in Baltimore. Click here to see the recipe for colcannon.

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