The Marc Steiner Show

Features

Democracy in Crisis: Department of Justification

March 9, 2017 – Segment 1 democracyincrisislogo

We begin the show with the newest episode of Democracy in Crisis, a weekly podcast hosted by Baynard Woods and Marc Steiner and produced by Mark Gunnery for Center for Emerging Media. This week we talk with Emily Bazelon, staff writer at the New York Times Magazine, who joins us to discuss her latest piece called “Department of Justification,” which reveals the long-shared vision of Steve Bannon, Stephen Miller, and Jeff Sessions. Then we turn to the International Women’s Day Strike with Kate D. Griffiths, who is on the U.S. National Organizing Committee for the strike. Griffiths co-authored an article for The Nation entitled “Striking on International Women’s Day Is Not a Privilege.”


Sound Bites: Food Waste and Recovery

March 2, 2017 – Segment 3 

On our newest edition of our series about our food and our world, Sound Bites. This week the topic is Food Waste & Recovery, which addresses issues that include jobs, food security and hunger, waste, public health, and community. We begin the hour with an overview of this important issue, with: Dr. Roni Neff, Director of Hopkins Center for Livable Future‘s Food System Sustainability and Public Health Program and Assistant Professor in the Bloomberg School’s Environmental Health Sciences Department and Health Policy and Management Departments; and Brenda Platt, co-Director of the Institute for Local Self-Reliance and Director of their Composting for Community Initiative.
Then we take a look at two local programs that are performing community work around Food Waste and Recovery. With: Michael Dorsey, Director of Community Initiatives at Chesapeake Center for Youth Development; and Michelle Antoinette Nelson, aka LOVE the Poet, Founder of Brown + Healthy.

Sound Bites: Climate Change and Oyster Restoration

February 23, 2017 – Segment 2 

The newest edition of our series on our food and our world, Sound Bites. We begin the hour with a discussion on Climate Change and Maryland. With Dr. Don Boesch, President of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science.
We turn to Oyster Restoration in the Chesapeake Bay. With: Robert Brown, President of Maryland’s Watermen’s Association; and Allison Colden, Chesapeake Bay Foundations’ Maryland Fisheries Scientist.

This Week’s Tengella’s Take

kolitengellaFebruary 17, 2017 — Segment 1

We hosted the newest edition of our weekly segment, Tengella’s Take with Center for Emerging Media Satirical Commentator Koli Tengella. Tengella is President of Tengella Edutainment, an instructor and creator of the Positive Social Change Performing Arts Program at Augusta Fells Savage Institute of Visual Arts High School, and he was a 2010 Open Society Institute Fellow.


Soundbites: Environmental Bills, Fermentation, & Immigration

Immigration Food Prep (Credit: New York Times)February 16, 2017 – Segment 3

We hosted our newest episode of Sound Bites, our series on our food and our world, we began the segment with a couple environmental bills currently before the Maryland Legislature, the Clean Water Commerce Act and the Polystyrene Phase Out. With: Betsy Nicholas, Co-chair of Maryland Clean Agriculture Coalition and Executive Director of Waterkeepers Chesapeake.
We then took a brief foray into the world of fermentation as Marc talked with Sandor Ellix Katz, a fermentation revivalist and author of Wild Fermentation, The Revolution Will Not Be Microwaved and The Art of Fermentation.
Finally, Marc then took a look at Immigration and the Food Industry. With: Tim Carman, food writer and critic for the Washington Post; and Maura Judkis, reporter for the Washington Post. The discussion springs from their recent article for the Washington Post, “Restaurants depend on immigrants. Trump’s orders could hit them particularly hard.”

This Day In History: Brownie McGhee & Aretha Franklin Day

Brownie McGhee (Credit: Last F.M.)

February 16, 2017 – Segment 2

We hosted our newest edition of This Day In History, our segment where we take a step back in time to highlight important events and people from this day.


Tengella’s Take: Systematic Racism Is A Mental Illness

tengellaFebruary 10, 2017 – Segment 1

We hosted our newest edition of our weekly segment Tengella’s Take, with Center for Emerging Media Satirical Commentator Koli Tengella. Tengella is President of Tengella Edutainment, an instructor and creator of the Positive Social Change Performing Arts Program at Augusta Fells Savage Institute of Visual Arts High School, and he was a 2010 Open Society Institute Fellow.


Sound Bites: Maryland Bills on Hunger & Pollution | Afro-Veganism

annapolisFebruary 9, 2017 – Segment 3

In our newest edition of our series on our food and our world, Sound Bites, we begin the hour with important bills introduced in the Maryland General Assembly.

First, joining us to talk about the Community Healthy Air Act is Assateague Coastkeeper Kathy Phillips, Executive Director of Assateague Coastal Trust.

Then Maryland Hunger Solutions’ Director Michael J. Wilson joins us to talk about three anti-hunger bills: The Maryland Cares for Kids Act, The Hunger-Free Schools Act of 2017, and The Maryland Meals for Achievement for Teens Act.

We close the show with a conversation on Afro-veganism. With: Heru, owner of the GruB Factory; and Brenda Sanders, Executive Director of the Better Health Better Life Organization, Co-organizer of The Vegan SoulFest, and one of the Directors of Open the Cages Alliance.

Baltimore Vegan Weekend takes place February 17-19, 2017. You can participate in the Vegan Food Crawl, the Mac ‘n Cheese Smackdown, the Vegan Pizza Fest and more! For more information visit the Facebook page or call 443-219-7971.


Tengella’s Take

January 27, 2017 – Segment 1 

We begin the show with our regular feature Tengella’s Take with Koli Tengella. Koli is President of Tengella Edutainment, an instructor and creator of the Positive Social Change Performing Arts Program at Augusta Fells Savage Institute of Visual Arts High School, and he was a 2010 Open Society Institute Fellow.


SoundBites: Future Harvest & Trump’s EPA

January 26, 2017 – Segment 2

We hosted our newest episode of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world. We begin the episode with Part 2 of a panel Marc moderated two weeks ago at Future Harvest Casa’s 18th Annual Conference, “Cultivate the Chesapeake Foodshed.” The panel was called “Policy Scoper: What’s happening in your state capital?” We discussed what food and agriculture policies are most important to the states of Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia, Delaware and the District of Columbia, and also discussed what food and agriculture policy could look like nationally with the incoming Trump administration. We heard Part 1 of this panel discussion last week. 
The panelists were: Ed Kee, Delaware Secretary of Agriculture; Spencer Moss, Executive Director of West Virginia Food and Farm Coalition; Eric Bendfeldt, Area and Extension Specialist of Community Viability at Virginia Cooperative Extension, Virginia Tech, Virginia State University; Laine Cidlowski, Food Policy Director for the District of Columbia Office of Planning and the District of Columbia Food Policy Council, and Ferd Hoefner, Senior Strategic Advisor for the National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition.
In the second half of SoundBites we had a conversation about Trump’s pick to run the EPA, Scott Pruit, his connection to the Chesapeake Bay, and legislation before the 2017 Maryland General Assembly that could affect water in Maryland. With: Betsy Nicholas, Executive Director of Chesapeake Waterkeepers; and Dean Naujok, Potomac Riverkeeper.

Tengella’s Take

January 20, 2017 – Segment 1 Photo Credit: Koli Tengella

We begin the show with our regular feature Tengella’s Take with Koli Tengella. Tengella is President of Tengella Edutainment, an instructor and creator of the Positive Social Change Performing Arts Program at Augusta Fells Savage Institute of Visual Arts High School, and he was a 2010 Open Society Institute Fellow.


Sound Bites: Future Harvest Cultivate the Chesapeake Foodshed

January 19, 2017 – Segment 3 

We turn to the newest episode of Sound Bites, our series on our food and our world. You will hear the first part of a panel I moderated last week at Future Harvest Casa’s 18th Annual Conference, “Cultivate the Chesapeake Foodshed.” The panel was called “Policy Scoper: What’s happening in your state capital?” We discussed what food and agriculture policies are most important to the states of Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia, Delaware and the District of Columbia, and also discussed what food and agriculture policy could look like nationally with the incoming Trump administration. On Thursday we’ll hear the first part of this panel discussion, and next week we’ll hear the second part.

The panelists were: Ed Kee, Delaware Secretary of Agriculture; Spencer Moss, Executive Director of West Virginia Food and Farm Coalition; Eric Bendfeldt, Area and Extension Specialist of Community Viability at Virginia Cooperative Extension, Virginia Tech, Virginia State University; Laine Cidlowski, Food Policy Director for the District of Columbia Office of Planning and the District of Columbia Food Policy Council, and Ferd Hoefner, Senior Strategic Advisor for the National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition.

Koli Tengella: Let There Be Peace on Earth

January 13, 2017 – Segment 1 Koli Tengella (Credit: Examiner)

It’s the newest edition of our weekly segment, Tengella’s Take with Center for Emerging Media Satirical Commentator Koli Tengella. Tengella is President of Tengella Edutainment, an instructor and creator of the Positive Social Change Performing Arts Program at Augusta Fells Savage Institute of Visual Arts High School, and he was a 2010 Open Society Institute Fellow.


Sound Bites: Farming in Baltimore / Agribusiness

January 12, 2017 – Segment 3

Sound Bites documentary recording at the Baltimore Free Farm

The newest episode of our show on on food and our world, Sound Bites. We will be talking food and farming projects in Baltimore, with: Andreas “Spilly” Spiliadis, farmer at Heckle Farm and performer with Baltimore Hoop Love; and Sache Jones, Ambassador for Green for All.
We close the show with a discussion on Agribusiness, with: Lindsay A. Thompson, Executive Director of Delaware-Maryland Agribusiness Association; and Patty Lovera, Assistant Director of Food and Water Watch, who coordinates the food team.

Tengella’s Take: Get On The Bus 4 What’s Just

Koli Tengella (Credit: Examiner)January 6, 2017 – Segment 1

We host the newest edition of our weekly segment, Tengella’s Take with Center for Emerging Media Satirical Commentator Koli Tengella. Tengella is President of Tengella Edutainment, an instructor and creator of the Positive Social Change Performing Arts Program at Augusta Fells Savage Institute of Visual Arts High School, and he was a 2010 Open Society Institute Fellow.


Sound Bites: Future Harvest Conference / Governor Hogan Environmental Plan

January 5, 2017 – Segment 2 

Our newest episode of our series on our food and our world, Sound Bites. We begin with a preview of a very important upcoming event: Future Harvest CASA’s 18th Annual Conference, Cultivate the Chesapeake Foodshed. With: Dena Liebman, Executive Director of Future Harvest CASA; Chris Blanchard, host and producer of the Farmer to Farmer Podcast, a long-form interview show with organic and local market farmers, former owner of Rock Spring Farm in Decorah, Iowa, and former co-Director of the largest organic farming conference in the world, the MOSES Organic Farming Conference in La Crosse, Wisconsin; and Dr. Kris Nichols, Chief Scientist at Rodale Institute, who worked for USDA’s Agricultural Research Service for over 14 years.
If you are interested in food and agriculture, you won’t want to miss Cultivate the Chesapeake Foodshed, Future Harvest CASA’s 18th annual conference! The conference takes place January 12-14 at the College Park Marriott in College Park, Maryland. I’ll be there moderating a panel of farm policy experts from all over the lower mid-Atlantic, including Delaware’s Secretary of Agriculture Ed Kee. 
 
The Future Harvest conference is the largest sustainable farming and food conference in the lower Mid-Atlantic. Farmers, healthy food advocates, and food businesses from all over Maryland, Delaware, Virginia, West Virginia, and DC come to this conference to learn about everything from building soil health, to how to start a craft alcohol business, to ways to stop food waste.
 
There are 48 sessions to choose from, and four keynotes, local food fair, networking sessions, and a local food dinner and lunch. On January 12, there are 10 pre-conference skill-building workshops. Click here for more information and to register. I hope to see you there!!
We close Sound Bites with a look at Governor Larry Hogan’s 2017 Environmental Legislative Agenda, as the Maryland General Assembly opens next Wednesday. With: Maryland State Senator Paul G. Pinsky (D-District 22, Prince George’s County), Vice-Chair of the Education, Health and Environmental Affairs Committee; and State Senator Stephen Waugh (R-District 29, Calvert & St. Mary’s Counties), member of the Education, Health and Environment Committee and Chair of the Republican Senatorial Committee.

Sound Bites: Chesapeake Bay Runoff and Waterwomen of the Chesapeake Bay

oysters

December 29, 2016 – Segment 2

We go back into our archives for the episode of Sound Bites where we discuss the December 2018 Federal government deadline for reducing runoff in the Chesapeake Bay, and steps that are being taken to meet it. We talk with: Scott Dance, who writes about the environment and the weather for The Baltimore Sun; and Carl Simon, Director of Programs at Blue Water Baltimore.
We also host a feature on Waterwomen of the Chesapeake Bay.With: Lydia Woolever, Associate Editor at Baltimore Magazine who wrote the July feature story “Waterwomen,” an in-depth look at a few fearless females who work the Chesapeake Bay themselves and, like their male counterparts, help keep the seafood industry alive; Jill Buck, waterwoman who has been on the water for six years after retiring from a career in childcare and who works as both a traditional waterwoman as well as a practicer of aquaculture; and Rachel Dean, a traditional waterwoman from Solomons Island and part-time high-school English teacher who is involved in waterman’s advocacy, two different fisheries commissions within the Maryland DNR, and Chesapeake Bay heritage tours.

SoundBites: Biggest Food & Agricultural Stories, Statewide Food Charter

Pig Farm (Credit: Mother Jones article by Tom Philpott)December 22, 2016 – Segment 3

We host our newest edition of Sound Bites, our series on our food and our world. We begin the hour with regular Sound Bites commentator Tom Philpott, who will reflect upon some of the biggest food and agriculture stories of 2016. Philpott is the food and agriculture correspondent for Mother Jones.

We also take a close look at the initiative in Maryland to begin a statewide Food Charter, with the Institute for Public Health Innovation.  Our guests will be Christine Bergmark, Project Coordinator of the Maryland Food Charter; and Denzel Mitchell, farmer, educator, food justice advocate and political commentator.


Tengella’s Take: Dealing With The Holidays

tengellaDecember 16, 2016 – Segment 1

We host the newest edition of our weekly segment, Tengella’s Take with Center for Emerging Media Satirical Commentator Koli Tengella.

Koli Tengella is President of Tengella Edutainment, an instructor and creator of the Positive Social Change Performing Arts Program at Augusta Fells Savage Institute of Visual Arts High School, and he was a 2010 Open Society Institute Fellow.


SoundBites: Environmental Justice & Fracking

Fracking Well (Credit: Colorado River Connected)December 15, 2016 – Segment 2

We host for you the newest episode of our series on our food and our world, Sound Bites. Our guests will discuss The Future of the Environmental Justice Movement Under the Trump Administration. With: Brentin Mock, staff writer at CityLab and formerly the justice editor at Grist; and Brittany Shenachie, activist and educator who has been involved with a variety of social movements in the US and the UK, with a primary focus on climate change and environmental justice.

In the last part of our new SoundBites segment we will also hear a report on how fracking produces tons of radioactive waste. With Jie Jenny Zou, reporting fellow for The Center for Public Integrity’s environment and labor team.


Tengella’s Take: Class Division in the Black Community

Koli TengellaDecember 9, 2016 – Segment 1

We host our regular weekly feature Tengella’s Take with Center for Emerging Media Satirical Commentator Koli Tengella. Tengella is President of Tengella Edutainment, an instructor and creator of the Positive Social Change Performing Arts Program at Augusta Fells Savage Institute of Visual Arts High School, and he was a 2010 Open Society Institute Fellow.


Tengella’s Take

December 2, 2016 – Segment 1 Photo Credit: Koli Tengella

We begin the show with our regular weekly feature Tengella’s Take with Center for Emerging Media Satirical Commentator Koli Tengella. Tengella is President of Tengella Edutainment, an instructor and creator of the Positive Social Change Performing Arts Program at Augusta Fells Savage Institute of Visual Arts High School, and he was a 2010 Open Society Institute Fellow.


Sound Bites: Fracking / John Ikerd

December 1, 2016 – Segment 3 cafo-chickens

For the newest episode of our series about our food and our world, Sound Bites. We begin the hour with our first Countdown to the Annapolis Summit: The Future of Fracking in Maryland. With: Mitch Jones, Senior Policy Advocate at Food and Water Watch; and Drew Cobbs, Executive Director of the Maryland Petroleum Council.
The 14th annual Annapolis Summit will take place on Wednesday, January 11, 7:30-10am, at the Governor Calvert House in Annapolis. I will interview Governor Larry Hogan, Maryland Senate President Mike Miller, and Maryland House Speaker Michael Busch. The Annapolis Summit is in partnership with The Daily Record. For more information and tickets, click here.
For the second half of Sound Bites, we bring you a panel I moderated at the First Baptist Church Family Life and Cultural Center in Salisbury, Maryland. It was called “Industrial CAFOs, Economics, and Public Health in Delmarva” and focused on the question, “How Safe is Your Water?” It was sponsored by Wicomico NAACP and Socially Responsible Agricultural Project. The impetus for the town hall was a proposed poultry operation in Wicomico County that would include up to thirteen chicken houses, each holding 30,000 chickens. The broiler operation would sit on top of the paleochannel, which is the public drinking water source for Salisbury residents. When this was first proposed citizens were left out of the County Council discussions and many were concerned about the health risks posed by these operations. What happened next was unique in the history of the eastern shore, as Black, Latino and White communities came together to convene this town meeting so their voices could be heard and could build a political movement. Go to steinershow.org to hear the full panel. Today, though, we are listening to the keynote address from that panel, which was delivered by Dr. John Ikerd, Professor Emeritus of Agricultural Economics at the University of Missouri.

Sound Bites: Industrial CAFOs, Economics, and Public Health in Delmarva

November 17, 2016 – Segment 1 cafo-chickens

The newest episode of our series on our food and our world, Sound Bites. Listen in to a powerful town hall meeting recorded last week in Salisbury: Industrial CAFOs, Economics, and Public Health in Delmarva. With: Dr. Sacoby Wilson, Assistant Professor with the Maryland Institute for Applied Environmental Health and Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of Maryland-College Park; Michele Merkel, Co-Director of Food and Water Justice at Food and Water Watch; and Dr. Jillian Fry, Project Director for Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health’s Center for a Livable Future and faculty member in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Behavior and Society at the Bloomberg School of Public Health. Dr. John Ikerd, Professor Emeritus of Agricultural Economics at the University of Missouri, gave a keynote address, that we will broadcast on the next episode of Sound Bites.

Tengella’s Take

November 11, 2016 – Segment 1 Koli Tengella

We begin the show with the newest edition of our weekly segment, Tengella’s Take with Center for Emerging Media Satirical Commentator Koli Tengella. Koli is President of Tengella Edutainment, an instructor and creator of the Positive Social Change Performing Arts Program at Augusta Fells Savage Institute of Visual Arts High School, and he was a 2010 Open Society Institute Fellow.


Sound Bites: YUMM! at the AVAM / Carbon Neutral Fertilizer

November 10, 2016 – Segment 2

We havescreen-shot-2016-11-11-at-10-55-16-am the newest episode of our series on our food and our world, Sound Bites. We begin the hour with a visit to the American Visionary Arts Museum’s exhibit, YUMMM! The History, Fantasy, and Future of Food with Rebecca Hoffberger, the Founder and Director of the American Visionary Art Museum.
Then I talk with two scientists about an important scientific advancement that could pave the way for a potential breakthrough in farming: Carbon-neutral fertilizer production. With: Dr. Katherine A. Brown, Staff Scientist at National Renewable Energy Laboratory; and Dr. Paul King, Staff Scientist and Manager of the Photobiology Group at National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

Tengella’s Take

November 4, 2016 – Segment 1Koli Tengella

We begin the show with our regular weekly feature Tengella’s Take with Center for Emerging Media Satirical Commentator Koli Tengella. Koli is President of Tengella Edutainment, an instructor and creator of the Positive Social Change Performing Arts Program at Augusta Fells Savage Institute of Visual Arts High School, and he was a 2010 Open Society Institute Fellow.


Sound Bites: Election Coverage

November 3, 2016 – Segment 2 windmills

For the newest episode of Sound Bites, our series on our food and our world. As we approach Election Day, our panel of guests will examine how the results of national, state, and local elections could affect the environment, agriculture, and food policy. With: Mitch Jones, Senior Policy Advocate at Food & Water Watch; and Bob Martin, Food System Policy Program Director for Center for a Livable Future.

Tengella’s Take: Halloween Costumes

October 28, 2016 – Segment 1Koli Tengella (Credit: Examiner)

We begin the show with the newest edition of our weekly segment, Tengella’s Take with Center for Emerging Media Satirical Commentator Koli Tengella. Koli is President of Tengella Edutainment, an instructor and creator of the Positive Social Change Performing Arts Program at Augusta Fells Savage Institute of Visual Arts High School, and he was a 2010 Open Society Institute Fellow.


Sound Bites: Diversifying the Basket / Maple Syrup / Sour Beef

October 27, 2016 – Segment 2

farmer on his tractor plowing the field, rural wyoming

In the latest episode of our series on our food and our world, Sound Bites. We begin the segment with an important study released last week by Fair Farms Maryland, “Diversifying the Agricultural Basket, Risks in Conventional Poultry Growing on Maryland’s Eastern Shore and Opportunities from Diversified Local Agriculture.” With: Betsy Nicholas, Executive Director of Waterkeepers Chesapeake; Aiden Irish, agricultural and local food systems policy analyst and Ph.D. student in the John Glenn College of Public Affairs at the Ohio State University; and Carole Morrison, transitional farmer who went from producing industrial contract chickens to pasture-raised eggs, at Bird’s Eye View Farm in Pokomoke City.
At 11:30 we bring you two special stories from Maryland Traditions, the Folk Life Program of the Maryland State Arts Council. We begin with a story on Maple Syrup, with Leo Shinholt, Maryland’s Largest Maple Sugar maker and recipient of a Maryland State Heritage Award; and Chad Buterbaugh, co-Director of Maryland Traditions.
We close the show at 11:45 with our second story from Maryland Traditions, about Sour Beef and Dumplings. For this segment our guest host is Steiner Show Senior Producer Mark Gunnery. We talk with: Freddy Hebert, Vice President of the Church Council at the Zion Lutheran Church of the City of Baltimore; and Chad Buterbaugh, co-Director of Maryland Traditions.

Tengella’s Take

October 21, 2016 – Segment 1 koli

We begin the show with our regular weekly feature Tengella’s Take with Center for Emerging Media Satirical Commentator Koli Tengella. Koli is President of Tengella Edutainment, an instructor and creator of the Positive Social Change Performing Arts Program at Augusta Fells Savage Institute of Visual Arts High School, and he was a 2010 Open Society Institute Fellow.


Sound Bites: Wenonah Hauter’s Frackopoly

October 20, 2016 – Segment 2frackopoly

We have our newest episode on our food and our world, Sound Bites. This week Wenonah Hauter, Founder and Executive Director of Food & Water Watch, joins us to discuss her new book Frackopoly: The Battle for the Future of Energy and the Environment.

Tengella’s Take

October 7, 2016 – Segment 1 Koli Tengella (Credit: Examiner)

We begin the show with the newest edition of our weekly segment Tengella’s Take with Center for Emerging Media Satirical Commentator Koli Tengella. Koli is President of Tengella Edutainment, an instructor and creator of the Positive Social Change Performing Arts Program at Augusta Fells Savage Institute of Visual Arts High School, and he was a 2010 Open Society Institute Fellow.


Sound Bites: MD Solar Congress / End-Dependence Day

October 6, 2016 – Segment 2 Baltimore, MD -7/2/14- Denzel Mitchell, of Baltimore, harvests for cucumbers Wednesday afternoon. Mitchell owns operates his farm, "Five Seeds Farm" and provides it's vegetables to local Baltimore restaurants. Rachel Woolf/Baltimore Sun -- #7308

Our newest episode of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world. We begin the hour with a preview of the first Maryland Solar Congress, which takes place Saturday, October 15. With: Corey Ramsden, Program Director for Maryland Solar United Neighborhoods; and Tim Judson from NIRS who will be presenting at the Solar Congress for the “Grid of the Future” workshop.
The Maryland Solar Congress will take place Saturday, October 15, 10am to 2pm, at the Annapolis Friends Meeting House, 351 Dubois Road, Annapolis, MD. Click here for more information.
For our second Sound Bites segment we have preview of another important event taking place next weekend in celebration of World Food Day, which is Sunday, October 16. End-Dependence Day at #WorldFoodDay2016 is hosted by the Black Yield Institute and the Black Church Food Security Network. With: Eric Jackson, Servant-Director of the Black Yield Institute; and the Rev. Dr. Heber Brown III, Founding Director of the Black Church Food Security Network and Orita’s Cross Freedom School, and Pastor of Pleasant Hope Baptist Church.
End-Dependence Day at #WorldFoodDay2016 will take place on Sunday, October 16, 4-7pm, at Pleasant Hope Baptist Church in Baltimore. For more information click here.

Sound Bites: Changes to Perdue’s Chicken Treatment Policies | Fracking & Radioactive Waste | Food Justice in Baltimore

Free-range chickens stand in a pen at an organic-accredited poultry farm in Germany.

September 29, 2016 – Segment 2

We bring a special selection from our Sound Bites archives today.

The show includes a talk with Perdue Farms and others about Perdue’s announcement earlier this week that they are adapting new, more humane, practices regarding the treatment of their chickens. With: Julie DeYoung, spokesperson for Perdue Farms; Ian Kullgren, POLITICO Pro Agriculture reporter; and Scott Edwards, Co-Director of the Food & Water Justice program at Food & Water Watch.

Next we turn to an environmental issue: How fracking produces tons of radioactive waste. With Jie Jenny Zou, reporting fellow for The Center for Public Integrity’s environment and labor team.

We close Sound Bites with a special segment produced by Baltimore Sound Society, asAdam Droneburg and Calvin Perry visit a food justice event at Baltimore’s Lexington Market.


Sound Bites: Bayer and Monsanto | Hip Chick Farms

hipchickSeptember 22, 2016 – Segment 3

In our newest episode of our series on our food and our world, Sound Bites, we begin the hour with a look at Bayer’s takeover of Monsanto. With: Patty Lovera, Assistant Director of Food and Water Watch, where she coordinates their food team; and Bill Freese, science policy analyst at the Center for Food Safety.
We close the show at with a look at a special agricultural operation and sustainable artisanal food production company, Hip Chick Farms. With: Serafina Palandech, Co-Founder and President of Hip Chick Farms, which she runs with her wife Jennifer Johnson, former sous chef at Chez Panisse under organic food pioneer Alice Waters and Executive Chef for the Getty Family.

Sound Bites: Water Rates, Sewage Infrastructure and Death of Bees

FILE - In this Jan. 28, 2014, file photo, a hive of honeybees appears on display at the Vermont Beekeeping Supply booth at the annual Vermont Farm Show at the Champlain Valley Expo in Essex Junction, Vt. The federal government hopes to reverse America's declining honeybee and monarch butterfly populations by making more federal land bee-friendly, spending more money on research and considering the use of less pesticides. (AP Photo/Andy Duback, File)September 15, 2016 – Segment 3

On the newest edition of our series about our food and our world, Sound Bites, we begin the hour with a look at the increase in cost of water bills for Baltimore City residents. With: Mitch Jones, Senior Policy Advocate at Food & Water Watch.
Then we examine Baltimore sewage infrastructure issues and last week’s ruling issued by the United States District Court for the District of Maryland, granting Blue Water Baltimore’s motion to intervene in a federal lawsuit filed in 2002 by Maryland and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency intended to fix the City of Baltimore’s failing sewer system. With: Halle Van der Gaag, Executive Director of Blue Water Baltimore; and David Flores, Baltimore Harbor Waterkeeper.
We close the show at 11:40 with the tragic death of bees that is being brought about by spraying for the Zika virus. With: Bonnie Raindrop, Legislative Chair of the Central Maryland Beekeepers Association.

Sound Bites: Sperm Whales / Urban Farming

September 8, 2016 – Segment 3urban-farm

A special rebroadcast of Sound Bites – our series about our food, our environment, and our world – listen in to a fascinating discussion on the language of Sperm Whales, as I talk with author and journalist James Nestor. His new book isDEEP: Freediving, Renegade Science, and What The Ocean Tells Us About Ourselves, and was featured in the The New York Times and Annapurna Pictures virtual-reality film, “The Click Effect.”
We close out Sound Bites with a visit to the urban garden at Frederick Douglass High School in Baltimore. Previously we discussed US Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack’s visit to Douglass to see their urban garden and examine the role of urban agriculture in education. The current episode features an interview in which formerSteiner Show Senior Producer Stefanie Mavronis and I visited Douglass to talk to the two teachers who started the project – Amanda Briody and Chris Jennings – and hear from four of the Douglass Freshman students currently involved in the program: La’Asia Howard, Dominic Scruggs, Nykerra Williams, and Maleke Smalls.

Sound Bites: Pollution and Urban Foraging

yesSeptember 1, 2016 – Segment 2

It’s the latest episode of our series on our food and our world, Sound Bites. This week we discuss the news that the State of Maryland reached a settlement with NRG Energy, the owner of two Maryland power plants that have been discharging wastewater with illegal amounts of nitrogen and phosphorous into the Potomac and Patuxent Rivers. NRG has been ordered to pay $1 million to settle, and to invest a total of $10 million in upgrading their wastewater filtration systems to reduce future pollution. With: Phillip Musegaas, Legal Director for Potomac Riverkeeper Network; Maryland Attorney General Brian Frosh; and Frederick Tutman, Patuxent Riverkeeper.

Then writer Jasleena Grewal, contributor to YES! Magazine and Brown Girl Magazine, joins us to discuss a piece she wrote for the current issue of Yes! Magazine called Urban Foraging: Weeds You Can Eat.

We close the show with guest host Mark Gunnery, Senior Producer for the Marc Steiner Show, talking with Baltimore Sun reporter Scott Dance about the state of Maryland’s waterways. Topics will include: recent reports that bodies of water around the state contain dangerous levels of fecal matter; news that amphetamine traces have been found in the Gwynns Falls; and this summer’s dead zones in the Chesapeake Bay. Dance writes about the environment and weather for the Baltimore Sun.


Sound Bites: Tha Flower Factory / Young Farmers / Dr. Margaret Gray

August 25, 2016 – Segment 3 12885807_688669934607507_1249625991172461393_o

Our guest host for Sound Bites is Denzel Mitchell, educator and former owner of Five Seeds Farm and Apiary in Baltimore.
The hour begins with an interview with farmer Walker Marsh, founder and owner of Tha Flower Factory, on their work and their Kickstarter campaign.
Then we have our Young Farmers Roundtable, with: Walker Marsh, Founder & Owner of Tha Flower Factory; Jason James, co-owner of Moon Valley Farm; and Kristen Carbone of Radix Farm.
We close out the show with an interview with Dr. Margaret Gray on her article for Jacobin, The Dark Side of Local: There’s nothing ethical about “buying local” and supporting small farms when the workers on them are brutally exploited. Dr. Gray is an Associate Professor of Political Science, Adelphi University and author of Labor and the Locavore: The Making of a Comprehensive Food Ethic.

Sound Bites: The 300 Pound Vegan and a Seasonal Recipe

vegansoulfestAugust 18, 2016 – Segment 4

We have our weekly installment of Sound Bites. The first segment of Sound Bites will have a guest host Denzel Mitchell, a Baltimore City resident, educator and farmer. Denzel speaks with Brenda Sanders, Executive Director of the Better Health Better Life organization and co-director of the Vegan Soulfest, Greg Brown, Co-owner and founder of Land of Kush, and David Carter, former NFL player Food justice and animal rights activist. The Vegan Soulfest is Saturday, August 20 at BCCC (2901 Liberty Heights Avenue) from 12pm-7:00pm. Then we close the show with a conversation with Willie Flowers. 


Sound Bites: Vegan SoulFest / Clean Energy Jobs Act

August 11, 2016 – Segment 2 Vegan Soulfest

We have the latest episode of our series on our food and our world, Sound Bites. We begin the hour with a preview of the third annual Vegan Soul Fest! With: Brenda Sanders, Co-organizer of the Vegan Soul Fest, Executive Director of the Better Health Better Life organization, and one of the Directors of Open the Cages Alliance; Naijha Wright, Co-organizer of the Vegan Soul Fest, Co-owner of Land of Kush restaurant, and Executive Director of the Black Vegetarian Society of Maryland.
The third annual Vegan Soul Fest is happening Saturday, Aug. 20 from noon to 7 p.m. on the BCCC Liberty campus, 2901 Liberty Heights Ave. in Baltimore. For more information about the festival, VeganSoulFest.com.
Then we close the show at 11:40 with a segment on Air Quality Issues, Code Orange Days, and Governor Hogan’s veto of the Clean Energy Jobs Act. With: Tiffany Hartung, Manager of the Maryland Climate Coalition; and Maryland pediatrician Dr. Maria Brown.

Sound Bites: Baltimore Ecosystem Study

Screen-Shot-2016-03-03-at-3.39.42-PMAugust 4, 2016 – Segment 2

In our latest edition of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world, we speak with participants from the Baltimore Ecosystem Study, a consortium of long-term research projects examining Baltimore’s ecosystem. We check in with:
  • Helen Glazer, 2014-2015 Baltimore Ecosystem Study Artist-in-Residence, whose project is an exhibition of prints, panoramic photographs and digitally-fabricated sculpture, concentrated on the Gwynns Falls watershed (see her work at helenglazer.com);
  • Dr. J. Morgan Grove, Scientist and Team Leader for the Forest Service at the Northern Research Station;
  • Dr. Shannon LaDeau, Associate Scientist of Disease Ecology at the Baltimore Ecosystem Study and The Cary Institute; and
  • Dr. Chris Swan, Professor in the Department of Geography & Environmental Systems at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County.

Sound Bites: Oyster Wars, When It Comes To Food, & The Air-Conditioned World

Oyster (Credit: Baltimore Sun)July 28, 2016 – Segment 2

We host our newest episode of our series on our food and our world: Sound Bites! We with a look at a recent article in the Baltimore Sun, “Oyster wars: Watermen aim to take back oyster bars as state panel reviews shellfish sanctuaries.” With: Kelton Clark, a Maryland Oyster Advisory Commission member and Director of Morgan State University’s Patuxent Environmental and Aquatic Research Laboratory; and Peyton Robertson, Director of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Chesapeake Bay Office.

We then learn “The One Thing Hillary Cares About Most –When It Comes to Food,” with Tom Philpott who wrote an article with that title for Mother Jones. Philpott is Mother Jones food and agriculture reporter and co-founder of Maverick Farms in North Carolina.

Finally, we take a look at how our air-conditioned world is affecting climate change. With Katie Herzog, staff writer at the environmental news site Grist.org, who wrote the article “How air-conditioning made America – and how it could break us all.”


Sound Bites: Controversy Over GMO Labeling | What A Fish Knows | Recipe: Seasonal Salad By Colette

What A Fish KnowsJuly 21, 2016 – Segment 3

On the newest episode of Sound Bites, our series on our food and our world. We begin the hour with a look at the controversy over the GMO Labeling bill that passed through Congress and is awaiting signature by President Obama. With Patty Lovera, Assistant Director of Food & Water Watch, where she coordinates the food team.
Then, we look at what a fish knows – literally! – with Dr. Jonathan Balcombe, author of the new book What A Fish Knows: The Inner Lives of Our Underwater Cousins. Dr. Balcombe is Director of Animal Sentience with the U.S. Humane Society Institute for Science and Policy in Washington, DC.
We close the hour with a special recipe: A Seasonal Salad with Stefano Porcile, Executive Chef at Colette in Baltimore’s Station North.

Sound Bites: Reducing Runoff In Baltimore By December 2018 | The Waterwomen Of The Chesapeake Bay

Screen Shot 2016-07-14 at 12.49.42 PMJuly 14, 2016 – Segment 2

We have two segments on the December 2018 Federal government deadline for reducing runoff in the Chesapeake Bay, and steps that are being taken to meet it. We talk with: Scott Dance, who writes about the environment and the weather for The Baltimore Sun; and Carl Simon, Director of Programs at Blue Water Baltimore.
We close the show at 11:30 with a feature on Waterwomen of the Chesapeake Bay.With: Lydia Woolever, Associate Editor at Baltimore Magazine who wrote the July feature story “Waterwomen,” an in-depth look at a few fearless females who work the Chesapeake Bay themselves and, like their male counterparts, help keep the seafood industry alive; Jill Buck, waterwoman who has been on the water for six years after retiring from a career in childcare and who works as both a traditional waterwoman as well as a practicer of aquaculture; and Rachel Dean, a traditional waterwoman from Solomons Island and part-time high-school English teacher who is involved in waterman’s advocacy, two different fisheries commissions within the Maryland DNR, and Chesapeake Bay heritage tours.

Sound Bites: Michael Pollen’s ‘In Defense Of Food’ & Student Access To Healthy Foods

Crossroads Community food Network (Credit: Crossroads Community food Network website)July 7, 2016 – Segment 2

We host our newest episode of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world. This week features a panel discussion I moderated last week at Busboys and Poets in Hyattsville. It was part of the Focus In! Film series, sponsored by Fair Farms and Crossroads Community Food Network. The evening began with a screening of the film “In Defense of Food,” featuring Michael Pollan, author of a number of books including The Omnivore’s Dilemma, and The Botany of Desire. The film centers around one of the most basic human questions “What should I eat?” According to Pollan, much of our food has been replaced by nutrients and food-like substances instead of real food.

The film was followed by a discussion on topics including the Prince George’s County Farm to School Program; school gardens; students learning about health, eating and food; healthy access to food in communities; food school system uses; and sourcing local food.

The panel included:

Betsy Nicholas, Executive Director of Fair Farms
Christie Balch, Executive Director of Crossroads Community Food Network
The Hon. Danielle Glaros, Prince George’s County Council
The Hon. Shani Warner, Hyattsville City Council
Ellarose Preston, Hyattsville Farm Market Manager, City of Hyattsville
Sara Booker, Maryland State Department of Education, Office of School Nutrition
Margaret Morgan Hubbard, Eco City Farms
Sydney Daigle, Prince George’s County Food Equity Council


Sound Bites: Changes to Perdue’s Chicken Treatment Policies | Fracking & Radioactive Waste | Food Justice in Baltimore

Abusing the chickens we eatJune 30, 2016 – Segment 3

It’s our newest episode of our series on our food and our world, Sound Bites! Today’s show includes a talk with Perdue Farms and others about Perdue’s announcement earlier this week that they are adapting new, more humane, practices regarding the treatment of their chickens. With: Julie DeYoung, spokesperson for Perdue Farms; Ian Kullgren, POLITICO Pro Agriculture reporter; and Scott Edwards, Co-Director of the Food & Water Justice program at Food & Water Watch.

Next we turn to an environmental issue: How fracking produces tons of radioactive waste. With Jie Jenny Zou, reporting fellow for The Center for Public Integrity’s environment and labor team.

We close Sound Bites with a special segment produced by Baltimore Sound Society, as Adam Droneburg and Calvin Perry visit a food justice event at Baltimore’s Lexington Market.


Sound Bites: Town Hall on Industrial Poultry Production on the Eastern Shore, Part 2/2

CAFOsJune 9, 2016 – Segment 3

On our newest episode about our food and our world, Sound Bites. You will hear the broadcast of Part 2 of a town hall I moderated a few weeks ago in Salisbury on the Eastern Shore. The impetus for the town hall was a proposed poultry operation in Wicomico Country that would include up to thirteen chicken houses, each holding 30,000 chickens. The broiler operation would sit on top of the paleochannel, which is the public drinking water source for Salisbury residents. When this was first proposed citizens were left out of the County Council discussions and many were concerned about the health risks posed by these operations. What happened next was unique in the history of the Eastern Shore, as Black, Latino and White communities came together to convene this town meeting to let their voices be heard and to build a political movement.
The panel theme of this panel was “Health” and we looked at the expansion of industrial scale poultry Confined Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) and discussed the impact on community health and safety that expansion is having or could have. We’re joined by public health experts who shared their perspectives on how zoning policy could be changed to protect public health and address community questions related to the density and intensity of industrial poultry CAFO expansion on the lower Eastern Shore. It was sponsored by The Concerned Citizens Against Industrial CAFOs (CCAIC), the Wicomico County Branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (WCNAACP), the Circle of Leaders (COL) and other concerned citizens of the lower Eastern Shore.
The panelists were:
  • Michelle Merkel, Co-Director, Food & Water Justice Food & Water Watch;
  • Frederick Tutman, Patuxent Riverkeeper and Farming Representative for the Patuxent River Commission;
  • Maria Payan, Consultant for Socially Responsible Agricultural Project;
  • Craig Watts, former contracted poultry grower; and
  • Dr. Jillian Fry, Director of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health’s Center for a Livable Future’s Public Health & Sustainable Aquaculture Project.

Sound Bites: Town Hall on Industrial Poultry Production on the Eastern Shore, Part 1/2

chickenJune 2, 2016 – Segment 3

It’s our newest episode about our food and our world, Sound Bites. We hear a broadcast of a town hall Marc moderated a couple weeks ago in Salisbury on the Eastern Shore. The impetus for the town hall was a proposed poultry operation in Wicomico Country that would include up to thirteen chicken houses, each holding 30,000 chickens. The broiler operation would sit on top of the paleochannel, which is the public drinking water source for Salisbury residents. When this was first proposed citizens were left out of the County Council discussions and many were concerned about the health risks posed by these operations. What happened next was unique in the history of the Eastern Shore, as Black, Latino and White communities came together to convene this town meeting to let their voices be heard and to build a political movement.
The panel theme of this panel was “Health” and we looked at the expansion of industrial scale poultry Confined Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) and discussed the impact on community health and safety that expansion is having or could have. We’re joined by public health experts who shared their perspectives on how zoning policy could be changed to protect public health and address community questions related to the density and intensity of industrial poultry CAFO expansion on the lower Eastern Shore. It was sponsored by The Concerned Citizens Against Industrial CAFOs (CCAIC), the Wicomico County Branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (WCNAACP), the Circle of Leaders (COL) and other concerned citizens of the lower Eastern Shore.
The panelists are:
  • Michelle Merkel, Co-Director, Food & Water Justice, Food & Water Watch;
  • Frederick Tutman, Patuxent Riverkeeper and Farming Representative for the Patuxent River Commission;
  • Maria Payan, Consultant for Socially Responsible Agricultural Project;
  • Craig Watts, former contracted poultry grower; and
  • Dr. Jillian Fry, Director of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health’s Center for a Livable Future’s Public Health & Sustainable Aquaculture Project

Sound Bites: A Visit To Black Dirt Farm On The Eastern Shore| Carbon-Neutral Fertilizer | Recipe: Mussels With Colette’s Stefano Porcile

Black Dirt Farm in Preston, MDMay 26, 2016 – Segment 3

For the newest episode of Sound Bites, our series on food, agriculture, the environment, and our future. Steiner Show Senior Producers Stefanie Mavronis and Mark Gunnery visit Black Dirt Farm in Preston, Maryland, where they talk with co-owner and co-operator Blain Snipstal.

Then I talk with two scientists about an important scientific advancement that could pave the way for a potential breakthrough in farming: Carbon-neutral fertilizer production. With: Dr. Katherine A. Brown, Staff Scientist at National Renewable Energy Laboratory; and Dr. Paul King, Staff Scientist and Manager of the Photobiology Group at National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

We close the show with a mouth-watering recipe for mussels from local chef Stefano Porcile, Executive Chef at Colette restaurant in Baltimore.


Sound Bites: The Language Of Sperm Whales | A Visit To The Urban Garden At Douglass High School In Baltimore

Douglass High School in BaltimoreMay 19, 2016 – Segment 3

On the newest edition of Sound Bites – our series about our food, our environment, and our world – listen to a fascinating discussion on the language of Sperm Whales, as I talk with author and journalist James Nestor. His new book isDEEP: Freediving, Renegade Science, and What The Ocean Tells Us About Ourselves, and was featured in the The New York Times and Annapurna Pictures virtual-reality film, “The Click Effect.”
We close out the show with a visit to the urban garden at Frederick Douglass High School in Baltimore. Two weeks ago we discussed US Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack’s visit to Douglass to see their urban garden and discuss the role of urban agriculture in education. Last week, Steiner Show Senior Producer Stefanie Mavronis and I visited Douglass to talk to the two teachers who started the project — Amanda Briody and Chris Jennings – and hear from four of the Douglass Freshman students currently involved in the program: La’Asia Howard, Dominic Scruggs, Nykerra Williams, and Maleke Smalls.

Downtown Voices: Episode 4 — The Uprising

Photo Credit: Stefanie MavronisMay 19, 2016 – Segment 1

Students involved in a recent project at UMBC have been collecting stories of Baltimore communities as they change and grow, meeting people where they are and listening to their stories. The project is called Baltimore Traces: Communities in Transition and it’s made possible by a Hrabowski Innovation Fund grant. This semester’s radio series, Downtown Voices, features students talking to city dwellers about their thoughts on the past, present, and future of Baltimore.

Today you will hear “The Uprising,” a snapshot of the movement that developed in the wake of Freddie Gray’s death, and the effect it has had on our city. Written by Michael Stone and Produced by Calvin Perry, both of Baltimore Traces.


The World That Brought Us Freddie Gray: Episode 1 – The Law

Mural by Nether and Stefan Ways in BaltimoreMay 9, 2016 – Segment 1

We begin the show with Episode 1 of The World That Brought Us Freddie Gray, a 5-part radio documentary produced by students at the University of Maryland Baltimore County in collaboration with the UMBC American Studies Department, Baltimore Traces, and the Center for Emerging Media. During the past semester as part of the UMBC American Studies Class “Radio In American Culture” taught by Steiner Show producer Stefanie Mavronis and myself, students have worked to produce a series highlighting the voices of residents of Baltimore City who have all in one way or another been affected by the death of Freddie Gray and the Uprising that followed.

Episode 1 on The Law features the voices of University of Maryland Carey School of Law professor Doug Colbert; civil rights lawyer A. Dwight Pettit; Tara Huffman of Open Society Institute-Baltimore; Perry Hopkins of Communities United; Baltimore resident Jessica Wyatt; Out 4 Justice’s Nicole Hanson; No Boundaries Coalition’s Ray Kelly; and Safe Street’s Gregory Mashburn.

Production, research, editing, and voice work for today’s segment on the Law was done by: Darrian Cate, Tyler Walsh, Heather Harvey, and Turrel David with executive production assistance by Marc Steiner, Stefanie Mavronis and Adam Droneburg.


The World That Brought Us Freddie Gray: Episode 2 – Policing & Police-Community Relations

Baltimore PoliceMay 10, 2016 – Segment 1

We begin the show with Episode 2 of The World That Brought Us Freddie Gray, a 5-part radio documentary produced by students at the University of Maryland Baltimore County in collaboration with the UMBC American Studies Department, Baltimore Traces, and the Center for Emerging Media. During the past semester as part of the UMBC American Studies Class “Radio In American Culture” taught by Steiner Show producer Stefanie Mavronis and myself, students have worked to produce a series highlighting the voices of residents of Baltimore City who have all in one way or another been affected by the death of Freddie Gray and the Uprising that followed.

Episode 2 on Policing and Police-Community Relations features the voices of civil rights layer A Dwight Pettit, Law Enforcement Against Prohibition’s Neill Franklin, Communities United’s John Comer, Gilmor Homes resident Tyesha Harrell, McCulloh Homes resident Rochelle Barksdale, former Baltimore police officer Michael A. Wood Jr., and The Real News’ Eddie Conway.

Production, research, editing, and voice work for today’s segment on Policing and Police-Community Relations was done by: Jeremy Mosier, Charlie Klontz, Laura Osborne, and Bryan Hargraves with executive production assistance by Marc Steiner, Stefanie Mavronis and Adam Droneburg.


The World That Brought Us Freddie Gray: Episode 3 – Education

EducationMay 11, 2016 – Segment 1

We begin the show with Part 3 of The World That Brought Us Freddie Gray, a 5-part radio documentary produced by students at the University of Maryland Baltimore County in collaboration with the UMBC American Studies Department, Baltimore Traces, and the Center for Emerging Media. During the past semester as part of the UMBC American Studies Class “Radio In American Culture” taught by Steiner Show producer Stefanie Mavronis and myself, students have worked to produce a series highlighting the voices of residents of Baltimore City who have all in one way or another been affected by the death of Freddie Gray and the Uprising that followed.

Episode 3 on Education features the voices of Dominque Stevenson of the American Friends Service Committee, Gilmor Homes resident Tyesha Harrell, Communities United’s John Comer, Morgan State University’s Dr. Lawrence Brown, Megan Carpenter who works at Benjamin Franklin High School, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, and UMBC President Dr. Freeman Hrabowski.

Production, research, editing, and voice work for today’s segment on Education was done by: Daniel Cummuta, Seamus Ertel, Autumn Kramer, Chelsey Wells, Darrian Cate, Tyler Walsh, Heather Harvey, and Turrel David.


The World That Brought Us Freddie Gray: Part 4 – Housing

Baltimore Housing (Credit: ujreview.com)May 12, 2016 – Segment 1

We host Part 4 of The World That Brought Us Freddie Gray, a 5-part radio documentary produced by students at the University of Maryland Baltimore County, a collaboration between the students, the UMBC American Studies Department, Baltimore Traces, and the Center for Emerging Media. During the past semester as part of the UMBC American Studies Class “Radio In American Culture” taught by Steiner Show producer Stefanie Mavronis and myself, students have worked to produce a series highlighting the voices of residents of Baltimore City who have all in one way or another been affected by the death of Freddie Gray and the Uprising that followed. Today’s episode focuses on Housing.

Episode 4 on Housing features the voices of Rochelle Barksdale of McCulloh Homes, Tyesha Williams of Gilmor Homes, homeless persons’ and housing advocate Jeff Singer, and Communities United’s John Comer.

Production, research, editing, and voice work for today’s segment on Education was done by: Dalton Maize, Kamilla Keldiyarova, Navaal Mahdi, and James Harris.


The World That Brought Us Freddie Gray: Episode 5 – Current Situation & Solutions

Potential SolutionsMay 13, 2016 – Segment 1

We host part 5 of The World That Brought Us Freddie Gray, a 5-part radio documentary produced by students at the University of Maryland Baltimore County, a collaboration between the students, the UMBC American Studies Department, Baltimore Traces, and the Center for Emerging Media. During the past semester as part of the UMBC American Studies Class “Radio In American Culture” taught by Steiner Show producer Stefanie Mavronis and myself, students have worked to produce a series highlighting the voices of residents of Baltimore City who have all in one way or another been affected by the death of Freddie Gray and the Uprising that followed.

Episode 5 on the Current Situation & Solutions features the voices of housing and homeless advocate Jeff Singer, Elder CW Harris of Jubilee Arts, The Real News Network’s Eddie Conway, Morgan State University’s Dr. Lawrence Brown, Tara Huffman of the Open Society Institute-Baltimore, former Baltimore police officer Michael A. Wood Jr., The Guardian’s Baynard Woods, and Communities United’s Perry Hopkins.

Production, research, editing, and voice work for today’s segment on Education was done by: Cody Selbert, Chris Lee, Claire Gautrois, Jourdan Grant, Evelyn Vartanian, Darrian Cate, Tyler Walsh, Heather Harvey, and Turrel David


The World That Brought Us Freddie Gray: Reflections From The Student Producers

UMBC studentsMay 13, 2016 – Segment 2

We host a roundtable with the students who helped produce The World That Brought Us Freddie Gray.

Steiner Show Senior Producer Stefanie Mavronis and I will talk with: Turrel David, current senior at UMBC majoring in Media and Communication Studies and American Studies, who worked on Episode 1 – The Law and was the music director for the project; and Dalton Maize, rising junior at UMBC majoring in Media and Communication Studies and Sociology who worked on Episode 4 – Housing.


Sound Bites: Health Of The Inner Harbor | Is The Hogan Administration Being Easy On Polluters? | Urban Farming & Health Initiatives In Baltimore’s Park Heights Community

Hogan (Credit: Baltimore Sun)May 12, 2016 – Segment 3

We host a brand new episode of Sound Bites, our weekly segment where we analyze important issues concerning food, agriculture, and the environment. Our guests will talk about the health of the Chesapeake Bay and consider whether Governor Larry Hogan’s administration is being strict enough about pollution in the Bay. With: Scott Dance, who writes about the environment and the weather at The Baltimore Sun; and Rena Steinzor, professor at the University of Maryland Carey School of Law and a founder of the Center for Progressive Reform.

We also talk with Willie Flowers, Executive Director of the Park Heights Community Health Alliance, about urban farming and health initiatives in the Park Heights community of Baltimore.


Trial Of Officer Nero, Charged In Death Of Freddie Gray, Scheduled To Begin Thursday

Protestors stand outside of the Baltimore Police Department's Western District police station during a march and vigil for Freddie Gray, Tuesday, April 21, 2015, in Baltimore. Gray died from spinal injuries a week after he was arrested and transported in a police van. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)May 10, 2016 – Segment 3

We close the show with a discussion on the upcoming trial of Baltimore police Officer Edward Nero in the death of Freddie Gray. With: Doug Colbert, Professor of Law at the University of Maryland Carey School of Law; and A. Dwight Pettit, Baltimore defense attorney who has represented clients in police misconduct cases.


Economic Development Alternatives in Baltimore & How We Get There

Baltimore CityMay 10, 2016 – Segment 2

We host another episode of our month-long series Baltimore Uprising: One Year Later. The episode focuses on Economic Development Alternatives in Baltimore & How We Get There. With: Kim Trueheart, longtime citizen activist and former candidate for Baltimore City Council President; Lawrence Grandpre, Assistant Director of Research and Public Policy for Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle; Jeff Singer, community organizer, clinical social worker, public policy advocate, and founder and former Executive Director of Health Care for the Homeless; and Sarah McKinley, Manager of Community Development Programs for The Democracy Collaborative.


Rebroadcast: Voices From the Freddie Gray Protests

Baltimore Uprising (Credit: BaltimoreSun)May 6, 2016 – Segment 3

We continue with Baltimore Uprising, One Year Later, with a rebroadcast of a piece we produced a year ago, Voices from the Freddie Gray Protests, featuring the voices of people at protests during the Uprising. You will hear from: Nyasha Dixon, Ralikh Hayes, Paul Rucker, Willa Bickham, Brendan Walsh, Rev. Dr. Heber Brown III, Molly Amster, Minister Carlos Muhammad, Dayvon Love, Dr. Lawrence Brown, Cordy Shaw, Person Ablach, students from Goucher, Councilpersons Carl Stokes, Nick Mosby, Brandon M. Scott and more.


Sound Bites: Urban Agriculture In Baltimore Schools | Chef Egg’s Interactive Cooking Programs

Fredrick Douglas Highschool (Credit: Afro.com)May 5, 2016 – Segment 3

We host our newest episode of Sound Bites, our series about our food, our environment and our world. We’ll talk about a new youth urban agriculture initiative at Frederick Douglass High School in West Baltimore, part of an urban farming initiative with the USDA. You’ll hear from: Amanda Briody, teacher at Frederick Douglass High School; Abby Cocke, Environmental Planner at the Baltimore City Office of Sustainability; and Allison Boyd, Director of the Farm Alliance of Baltimore.

 Also joining us is Chef Erik Berlin, aka Chef Egg, a local chef, culinary instructor and host of Chef Egg’s Cooking Eggsperience and Chef Egg Live/Hands On Chef Egg – interactive cooking programs. Chef Egg teaches cooking to youth and veterans.

Jean Albert Renaud on the Lead Up to the 1968 Riots

JARMay 5, 2016 – Segment 2

We continue our feature Baltimore Uprising: One Year Later, as Steiner Show producer Mark Gunnery interviews Jean Albert Renaud in a conversation about the lead up to the 1968 Baltimore riots. Renaud is a former Motown artist, horseman, wild Mustang rancher, and founder of Protect Yourself 1 and Project Arrowhead, two programs for at-risk youth.


A Tale of Two Cities: Examining West Baltimore Then & Now In The Context Of Last April’s Uprising

Tale of Two cities (Credit: Baltimore Magazine)April 29, 2016 – Segment 2

We talk with Ron Cassie, Senior Editor of Baltimore Magazine, about his in-depth and thought-provoking article “A Tale of Two Cities: For half a century, West Baltimore was a vital center of black culture, mixed-income neighborhoods, and groundbreaking civil rights activism. After Freddie Gray, can it be again?”


Sound Bites: Young Baltimore Activist Wins Goldman Environmental Prize | America’s Wasteful Obsession With Bottled Water | Recipe: Spaghetti Aglio e Olio

Destiny Watford (Credit: Inhabitat)April 28, 2016 – Segment 2

We host our newest edition of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world. We begin the hour with an interview with Destiny Watford, a young activist from Baltimore who won the Goldman Prize, the world’s largest award recognizing grassroots environmental activists, for her work to stop plans to build the Fairfield incinerator – the nation’s largest incinerator – less than a mile away from her high school.

We examine America’s growing obsession with bottled water. With: Roberto Ferdman, journalist who covers food and economics for The Washington PostChristopher Hogan, IOM Vice President of Communications for the International Bottled Water Association; and Emily Wurth, Water Program Director for Food and Water Watch.

Sound Bites with a recipe for a simple and refreshing take on pasta: spaghetti aglio e olio, from culinary aficionado Sam Levin. 


Baltimore Mayoral Candidates Forum For Ex-Offenders, Full Audio

Baltimore Mayoral Ex Offenders Forum April 25, 2016 – Segment 1

We hear the full audio from the Baltimore Mayoral Forum for Ex-Offenders, which took place Wednesday, April 14, at Douglas Memorial Community Church. The forum was co-moderated by Eddie Conway, Producer at the Real News Network’s Baltimore Bureau, and yours truly. Candidates who participated included: Sheila Dixon, Elizabeth Embry, Joshua Harris, DeRay Mckesson, State Senator Catherine Pugh, Councilman Carl Stokes, and David Warnock.


Baltimore Mayoral Candidates Forum For Ex-Offenders, Part 1

Baltimore Ex-Offenders (Credit: City Paper)April 22, 2016 – Segment 3

We host the first part of a broadcast of the Baltimore Mayoral Forum for Ex-Offenders, which took place Wednesday, April 14, at Douglas Memorial Community Church. Candidates who participated included: Sheila Dixon, Elizabeth Embry, Joshua Harris, DeRay McKesson, State Senator Catherine Pugh, Councilman Carl Stokes, and David Warnock.


Sound Bites: How Environmental Legislation Fared In The 2016 Maryland General Assembly | Pollinator Protection In MD | New Baltimore City Sustainability Plan | Recipe: Passover With Michael Twitty

General Assembly (credit: Politicalmaryland)April 21, 2016 – Segment 2

We host a segment from Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world, we take a look at how agricultural and environmental legislation fared in the 2016 Maryland General Assembly. With Tim Wheeler, Managing Editor and Project Writer for Chesapeake Bay Journal.

We examine more closely one of those pieces of legislation, the Pollinator Protection Act of 2016, as Maryland could become the first state to pass restrictions on consumer use of neonicotinoids, the pesticides implicated in bee population declines. (The bill passed through the General Assembly and is waiting for signature by Governor Larry Hogan.) With: Bonnie Raindrop, Legislative Chair of the Central Maryland Beekeepers Association.

We check in with the Baltimore Office of Sustainability about the new city-wide sustainability plan. With: Kristin Baja, Climate and Resilience Planner and Floodplain Manager for the Baltimore Office of Sustainability; and Earl Johnson, Executive Director of Come Home Baltimore Foundation.

Passover begins Saturday at sundown, so we bring you a special Passover recipe from Michael Twitty, culinary historian of African and African American foodways, blogger at Afroculinaria, and recent TED fellow.


Luminous Intervention At The Tubman House In Baltimore

Tubman House (Credit: Sandiegouniontribune)

April 19, 2016 – Segment 4

We are joined by Talib Saber, Program Associate for the Friend of a Friend program, talking about the Tubman House. We discuss the Luminous Intervention Project with him and its involvement with the Tubman House.


Timothy Wilson, Community Advocate & Friend Of Freddie Gray, Reflects On Sandtown-Winchester A Year Later

Freddie Gray Protestors (Credit: Washington Post)April 19, 2016 – Segment 3

We reflect upon the anniversary of his death and of the Baltimore Uprising. With:  Timothy Wilson, co-Director at On Our Shoulders and Vice Chairman of the Criminal Justice Committee at the NAACP of Baltimore.


Ralikh Hayes Reflects On The Year Since Freddie Gray’s Death & The Uprising

Baltimore Uprising Art (Credit: YesMagazine)April 19, 2016 – Segment 2

Today is the one-year anniversary of the death of Freddie Gray. Producer Stefanie Mavronis brings us a conversation with Ralikh Hayes, organizer with Bmore Bloc, about the anniversary of Gray’s death and of the Baltimore Uprising.


Update: The Tubman House Project With Dominque Stevenson

Tubman House (Credit: Baltimore Sun)April 13, 2016 – Segment 1

We host an update on the construction of the Tubman House in Sandtown with Dominique Stevenson. Dominique is a Program Director for the American Friends Service Committee and co-author of Marshall Law: The Life and Times of a Baltimore Black Panther.


RaceBrave: New and Selected Works

racebraveApril 11, 2016 – Segment 1

It’s WEAA’s Spring Membership Drive. Call 410-319-8888 between 10am and noon with your pledge or go to the WEAA website and designate The Marc Steiner Show when making your pledge. Thanks!! If you pledge $100 you could have Dr. Kaye’s new book RaceBrave: New and Selected Works.

Dr. Karsonya “Kaye” Wise Whitehead, Assistant Professor of Communication and Affiliate Assistant Professor of African and African American Studies at Loyola University Maryland, joins us to talk about her new book, RaceBrave: New and Selected Works.

One Sandtown Pastor’s Protest To Get Out the Vote

Elder C.W. Harris (Credit: BaltimoreSun)April 8, 2016 – Segment 4

On Monday (April 4, 2016)Elder C.W. Harris, a life-long Sandtown-Winchester resident and co-founder of Newborn Community of Faith Church, announced that he was planning to live on the roof of 1947 Pennsylvania Avenue until 514 people from his beloved community vote in Maryland’s upcoming primary election, which takes place on Tuesday April 26th. Elder Harris will begin his moral witness at 10am on Saturday April 16th, 2016. I met Elder Harris in Sandtown to talk to him about that action and what this past year in Sandtown has been like since Freddie Gray’s arrest and death.


Discussion with Luminous Intervention

Luminous Intervention Project (Credit: Light City Baltimore Site)April 8, 2016 – Segment 3

We host a discussion with members of the Luminous Intervention Project who hosted a piece during Light City Baltimore. During the festival the group presented projection based collages, highlighting issues surrounding Baltimore City’s government: police violence, education and recreation, and housing.

We talk with: Mike McGwire, founding member of Luminous Intervention, and President of Research Associates Foundation; as well as Baltimore based artist Olivia Robinson, Founding member of Luminous Intervention, Faculty member of the Fiber Department at MICA, and a Member of Art-Part’Heid.


Baltimore Uprising, One Year Later: Paul Rucker on History, Art, and the Uprising

Baltimore Uprising Art (Credit: YesMagazine)April 8th, 2016 – Segment 2

We play a  segment of our project: Baltimore Uprising, One Year Later, we talk with cellist, artist, and Baker Artist Award recipient Paul Rucker about history, art, and the Uprising.


Sound Bites: The Color Of Food | How Race & Agriculture Intersect

The Color of FoodApril 7, 2016 – Segment 3

On Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world, we are joined by Natasha Bowens. Bowens is a beginning farmer and community grower in Western Maryland, who wrote the book The Color of Food: Stories of Race, Resilience and Farming.

Then, we hear from Denzel Mitchell, formerly of Five Seeds Farm and Apiary in Baltimore, as he and Bowens talk about the ways that race intersects with agriculture and our food movement.

This episode is a rebroadcast from August 2015.


Baltimore Uprising, One Year Later: Kim Chase On Growing Up In West Baltimore

Kim ChaseApril 7, 2016 – Segment 1

We begin the show with the next installment of our series Baltimore Uprising, One Year Later. We look back at the 1968 unrest in Baltimore following the death of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. With: Kim Chase, Business Manager for WEAA.

Baltimore Uprising, One Year Later: 1968 and 2015

Voices Of The Freddie Gray ProtestApril 6, 2016 – Segment 2

As part of our series this month, Baltimore Uprising, One Year Later, our guests consider both the 1968 unrest and the 2015 uprising.  With: The Rev. Dr. Heber Brown, Pastor of Pleasant Hope Baptist Church and Executive Director of Orita’s Cross Freedom School; Lady Brion, spoken word artist and Baltimore’s Grand Slam Champion, Resident Poet for Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle, and Program Manager for Dewmore Baltimore; Avon Bellamy, Sr., poet, writer and activist; and Dr. Robert Birt, author of The Liberatory Thought of Martin Luther King Jr.: Critical Essays on the Philosopher King, and Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Bowie State University.

Baltimore Uprising, One Year Later: Looking Back at 1968

riotApril 5, 2016 – Segment 5

It’s our latest installment of our month-long series, Baltimore Uprising, One Year Later. Today’s installment is called Looking Back at 1968. With guest host Mark Gunnery, producer for The Marc Steiner Show, who interviews Dr. Robert Birt, author of The Liberatory Thought of Martin Luther King Jr.: Critical Essays on the Philosopher King, and Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Bowie State University.


Police Accountability Legislation in Maryland

annapolisApril 5, 2016 – Segment 2

The Maryland General Assembly is winding down, and we hear an update on the state of legislation on police accountability before the state legislature. With: Dayvon Love, Director of Research and Public Policy for Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle.


The Comparison & Contrast of MLK and The Baltimore Uprising

17083894938_8d818e19c2_nApril 4, 2016 – Segment 2

Marc reflects upon, contrast and compare the 1968 Baltimore riots following the death of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and the 2015 Baltimore Uprising. With: Dominique Stevenson, Program Director for the American Friends Service Committee and co-author of Marshall Law: The Life and Times of a Baltimore Black Panther; and Marshall “Eddie” Conway, Producer at the Real News Network‘s Baltimore Bureau, former Baltimore Black Panther leader and political prisoner, and co-author of Marshall Law: The Life and Times of a Baltimore Black Panther.


Racial Biases of Police & Police/ Community Relationships

13288873315_05960d3e0b_nApril 4, 2016 – Segment 1

Our first group of guests will talk about policing, perceived racial biases of police, and police/community relationships in neighborhoods such as Sandtown-Winchester. With: Tiffany Welch, Director of Health and Food Access for the No Boundaries Coalition; and Ray Kelly, community organizer with the No Boundaries Coalition.

 


Sound Bites: Fairfield Incinerator Permit Expires | Phosphorus Regulation In Maryland | Food Educator Jennifer Crisp

Baltimore Fairfield IncineratorMarch 31, 2016 – Segment 2

On our newest episode of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world, we begin with a follow-up to previous episodes about the proposed Fairfield Incinerator in Curtis Bay. The permit for the project was ruled expired this month by the Maryland Department of the Environment. With: James Strong, Sub-District Director for United Steelworkers District 8; and Leah Kelly, attorney with the Environmental Integrity Project.
Then, we talk with Jeremy Cox, Business Reporter from Delmarva Now, about Maryland Department of Agriculture’s announcement earlier this month that, based on statewide soil test information, some 82% of farm fields will not be impacted by new environmental regulations potentially limiting phosphorus application or the use of animal manure as a fertilizer.
We close out the show with food educator and documentary producer Jennifer Crisp. Crisp joins us to talk about new projects focusing on food and education. She produced Giobbi, a documentary about  a chef who finally gets to meet her 89 year old mentor: Artist, chef, cookbook author, gardener and winemaker Edward Giobbi. Crisp also teaches a seed-to-table program in Baltimore City Public Schools.

Sound Bites: Impact Of Sewage Pollution In Baltimore’s Harbor | Detroit Black Community Food Security Network | Recipe: Palestinian Easter Kaik With Dates

Baltimore Harbor (Photo Credit: Forsaken Fotos via Flickr)March 24, 2016 – Hour 2

For our newest edition of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world.  We begin the hour with an update on the state of sewage pollution in the Baltimore Harbor. Baltimore’s Department of Public Works (DPW) estimated that 12.6 million gallons of wastewater were dumped into the harbor last month following a storm. With: David Flores, Baltimore Harbor Waterkeeper, Blue Water Baltimore.
Then, we talk with Malik Yakini, Executive Director of the Detroit Black Community Food Security Network and founder of D-Town Farm, an urban farm in Detroit. We discuss racism in the food system and the food movement, as well as Yakini’s work for social justice, food equity, and food security for the people of Detroit.
We close out Sound Bites with a special Palestinian Easter Recipe. Laila El-Haddad, co-author of The Gaza Kitchen: A Palestinian Culinary Journey, shares a traditional Palestinian Easter recipe, kaik with dates.

Sound Bites: Sandtown–Building a Model for Food and Jobs

Sandtown-WinchesterMarch 17, 2016 – Segment 3

In a special archive edition of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world, we hear a rebroadcast of a Good Food Gathering town hall meeting held last summer in partnership with Hopkins’ Baltimore Food and Faith Project, titled Sandtown: Building a Model for Food and Jobs. The town hall took place at Jubilee Arts, located in the Sandtown Winchester neighborhood of Baltimore, which was at the center of the Baltimore Uprising and was the neighborhood where Freddie Gray lived and was arrested.
The panel was comprised of three members of the faith community who are working on food and employment issues in interesting and effective ways: Elder C.W. Harrisof Strength to Love II Farm and Newborn Holistic Ministries; Antoine Bennet of New Song Community Church; and Melissa Kelly of the No Boundaries Coalition.

Sound Bites: Institutional Food Procurement | SCOTUS and Chesapeake Bay | A Vegan Poem

bayMarch 10, 2016 – Segment 3

On our newest edition of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world, we begin the with a look at one of the key issues for systemic change in the sustainability of our food system: Institutional Food Procurement and Recommendations for Improvement. We look at a report with the same name written by the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future. With: Raychel Santo, Program Coordinator, Food Communities and Public Health at the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future, Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Then we turn to the Chesapeake Bay, with a look at the U.S. Supreme Court decision last week to decline to hear a challenge to the Chesapeake Bay Cleanup Plan, by the American Farm Bureau Federation. With: Darryl Fears, reporter for The Washington Post, where he covers the environment with a focus on the Chesapeake Bay and wildlife; Tim Wheeler, Managing Editor and Project Writer for Chesapeake Bay Journal; and Jon Mueller, Chesapeake Bay Foundation VP of litigation and lead person on that court case.
We close out the show with a poem, A Vegan Change of Heart, by the son of a farmer who speaks from his heart about his decision to stop eating animal products.

Sound Bites: Baltimore Ecosystem Study

photo by Helen GlazerMarch 3, 2016 – Segment 2

In our latest edition of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world, we speak with participants from the Baltimore Ecosystem Study, a consortium of long-term research projects examining Baltimore’s ecosystem. We check in with:
  • Helen Glazer, 2014-2015 Baltimore Ecosystem Study Artist-in-Residence, whose project is an exhibition of prints, panoramic photographs and digitally-fabricated sculpture, concentrated on the Gwynns Falls watershed (see her work at helenglazer.com);
  • Dr. J. Morgan Grove, Scientist and Team Leader for the Forest Service at the Northern Research Station;
  • Dr. Shannon LaDeau, Associate Scientist of Disease Ecology at the Baltimore Ecosystem Study and The Cary Institute; and
  • Dr. Chris Swan, Professor in the Department of Geography & Environmental Systems at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County.

Sound Bites: Afroculinaria’s Michael Twitty | Building The Black Yield Institute For Black Food Sovereignty

Michael Twitty (Photo Credit: Afroculinaria)February 25, 2016 – Hour 2

On our newest edition of Sound Bites – our series about our food and our world – we begin the hour with my conversation with Michael Twitty, culinary historian of African and African American foodways, blogger at Afroculinaria, and recent TED fellow.
We close the show with Eric Jackson, Servant-Director of the Black Yield Institute, who tells us about Black food sovereignty. Black Yield Institute is an Action Network of Black people and entities that serve to catalyze action in the pursuit of Black food sovereignty in Black and poor Baltimore. The aim of Black Yield Institute is the pursuit of a united Black community in the process of building power through cooperative economics, social and cultural affirmation, political action and collective wellness practices.

Sound Bites: Backlash Against Chicken House Construction | Labor Conditions in Poultry Plants | Recipe: Catalina Byrd

ChickenFebruary 18, 2016 – Segment 2

On our newest episode of our series about our food and our world, Sound Bites, we continue our coverage of the community organizing happening on the Eastern Shore against expansion of the poultry industry. We will talk with Jeremy Cox, reporter for The Daily Times of Salisbury, about his recent article, “Backyard backlash: How Delmarva turned against poultry.”
Then we shine a light on the treatment of workers in the poultry industry, from an Oxfam report, Lives on the Line: The High Human Cost of Chicken. With Minor Sinclair, Director of the U.S. regional office of Oxfam America; and C. Shawn Boehringer, Chief Counsel of Maryland Legal Aid. Sinclair and Boehringer co-authored an article in last week’s Baltimore Sun, “Poultry processing, a thankless job.”
We close Sound Bites with a special recipe from media consultant and political strategist Catalina Byrd, who will be the featured artist and guest chef this Sunday, February 21 at NANCY by SNAC’s Sunday Breakfast with the Artists.

Sound Bites: United Nations Comments On Curtis Bay Incinerator | Salisbury Teacher On Protecting Perdue’s Chickens

chickenFebruary 11, 2016 – Segment 3

On our newest edition of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world, we begin the hour with a look at the health implications of the proposed Curtis Bay Incinerator. With: Tim Whitehouse, Executive Director of the Chesapeake Physicians for Social Responsibility, former head of the Law and Policy Program at the Commission for Environmental Cooperation in Montreal, and former senior attorney at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in Washington, D.C.; and Dr. Gwen DuBois, Secretary of the Chesapeake Physicians for Social Responsibility Board of Directors, instructor in Medicine at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and a member of the Public Health Committee of the Maryland State Medical Society.
Last week’s statement issued by United Nations’ Working Group of Experts on People of African Descent stated: “The highest polluting industrial facilities, across a range of sectors from farming, mining to manufacturing, are more likely to be situated in poor and minority neighbourhood, including those of people of African descent. For instance, we are concerned about the possible health risks to people of African descent on account of the incinerator project in Curtis Bay, Baltimore and the lead contaminated water in Flint, Michigan. African American communities are calling for environmental justice as they are concerned that they are disproportionately exposed to environmental hazards impacting their health and standard of living.”
We close the show with a discussion with Jane Langrall Robinson, a middle-school teacher and animal advocate in Salisbury, Maryland, who caught our eye with her op-ed in the Baltimore Sun last month: Protecting Perdue’s chickens.

Sound Bites: “If There Are No New Farmers, Who Will Grow Our Food?”

Kim EckartFebruary 4, 2016 – Segment 2

Today on Sound Bites, we meet with Kim Eckarta Seattle-based writer and associate editor at Yes! magazine.  She wrote an article called, “If There Are No New Farmers, Who Will Grow Our Food?” for How to Create a Culture of Good Health, the Winter 2016 issue of YES! Magazine.

We are then joined by young farmers Walker Marsh, Founder & Owner of The Flower Factory; Isabel Antreasian, Project Manager for Whitelock Community Farm; Sache Jones, Food Justice Consultant for Park Heights Community Health Alliance and Manager of the AFYA Community Teaching Garden in Park Heights; and Charlotte Keniston, current Open Society Institute fellow, working with Paul’s Place on community-led interventions to address food accessibility in the Pigtown neighborhood of Baltimore.


Sound Bites: Community Impacts of Industrial Poultry Operations On The Eastern Shore

Photo Credit: Citizens for a Better Eastern ShoreJanuary 28, 2016 – Hour 2

On our newest edition of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world, we look at Community Impacts of Industrial Poultry Operations. Last week I took a trip to Exmore, Virginia, a small town south of Chincoteague on Virginia’s Eastern Shore, where I moderated a forum for the Citizens for a Better Eastern Shore, exploring community impacts of industrial poultry operations — including the construction of poultry houses and the spreading of poultry litter on fields — at the Broadwater Academy. Just as communities on Maryland’s Eastern Shore are beginning to organize against the mass expansion of industrial poultry farming, communities in Virginia are beginning to do the same.
The panelists included:
  • Mark Brush, Associate Professor of Marine Science at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science;
  • Jillian Fry of the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health;
  • Carole Morrison, former Industrial Poultry grower, now small-scale farm grower;
  • Roger Everton and Neil Zahradka of the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality; and
  • Maria Payan, Consultant, Socially Responsible Agricultural Project.

This broadcast was edited for time. To hear the full, unedited audio from this town hall forum click here


Sound Bites: Maryland Legislators Debate Poultry Litter & Farmer’s Rights | What Are Food Policy Councils?

ChickenJanuary 21, 2016 – Segment 2

On Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world, our first group of guests reflects upon two agricultural issues before the Maryland General Assembly: The Poultry Litter Management Act and the Farmer’s Rights Act. With:Betsy Nicholas, Co-chair of Maryland Clean Agriculture Coalition and Executive Director of Waterkeepers Chesapeake; Doug R. Myers, Maryland Senior Scientist at the Chesapeake Bay Foundation; Mitch Jones, Senior Policy Advocate for Food and Water Watch; and Valerie Connelly, Executive Director for the Maryland Farm Bureau.
We close the show with a look at Food Policy Councils – what they are, and why they are important. With: Anne Palmer, Program Director at Center for a Livable Future at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Sound Bites: How We Define Organic Food | When Cultural Food Becomes Trendy

Urban Farm (Credit: Grid Philly)January 14, 2015 – Segment 3

We play the latest episode of our series on our food and our world, Sound Bites. First we look at the definitions of organic food with Steve Savage, blogger and Agricultural Technology consultant; and Jay Martin, farmer at Provident Organic Farm.

We then have an interview with Ruth Tam, Web Producer of The Kojo Nnamdi Show and contributor to She the People, about her article for the Washington Post: “How it feels when white people shame your culture’s food – then make it trendy.”


Sound Bites: Environment & Upcoming Legislative Session | Remembering Life & Work of Cultural Anthropologist Sidney Mintz

5640847994_02bfcd008e_nJanuary 7, 2016 – Segment 2

Today during the newest edition of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world, we begin with a look at environmental legislation that will be addressed in the 2016 Maryland General Assembly, in our Countdown to the Annapolis Summit. Joining us will be  Dru Schmidt-Perkins, President of 1000 Friends of Maryland; and Mitch Jones, Senior Policy Advocate at Food and Water Watch.
We close out Sound Bites with a special tribute to the life and work of renowned cultural anthropologist Dr. Sidney Mintz, known as the Father of Food Anthropology. Mr. Mintz died on December 27, 2015 at the age of 93. Celebrating his life and work is Sarah Hill, Associate Professor of Environmental and Sustainability Studies at Western Michigan University and author of the Boston Review article “The Sweet Life of Sidney Mintz;” Kevin A. Yelvington, Professor of Anthropology at the University of South Florida; Richard Wilk, Distinguished Professor of Anthropology at Indiana University and Jane Guyer, George Armstrong Kelly Professor of Anthropology at Johns Hopkins University.

 


Sound Bites: Building a Model for Food and Jobs in Sandtown-Winchester

Sandtown-WinchesterDecember 31, 2015 – Segment 2

It’s another episode of our series on our food and our world, Sound Bites. This week we bring you the first part of our Good Food Gathering town hall meeting held June 16 in partnership with Hopkins’ Baltimore Food and Faith Project, titled Sandtown: Building a Model for Food and Jobs. The town hall took place at Jubilee Arts, located in the Sandtown Winchester neighborhood of Baltimore, which was at the center of the Baltimore Uprising and was the neighborhood where Freddie Gray lived and was arrested.

The panel was comprised of three members of the faith community who are working on food and employment issues in interesting and effective ways: Elder C.W. Harris of Strength to Love II Farm and Newborn Holistic Ministries; Antoine Bennet of New Song Community Church; and Melissa Kelly of the No Boundaries Coalition.

This segment originally aired in June 2015.


Sound Bites: Fairfield Incinerator Protest Ends In Arrests | Environmental Justice In Maryland

Incinerator Protest (Credit: Nicole King)December 17, 2015 – Segment 2

On our newest edition about our series about food and our world, Sound Bites, we check in on a protest against the proposed Fairfield trash incinerator in South Baltimore. Joining us will be Destiny Waterford, leader with Free Your Voice and United Workers and junior at Towson University; Gregg Sawtell, leadership organizers for United Workers, Josh Acevedo from Free Your Voice who was arrested for protesting, Crystal Hall from Free Your Voice, also arrested for protesting  and Nell Seldman, President of the Institute for Local Self Reliance.

And, we talk with Dr. Matthew Peters, Staff Attorney, for the University of Maryland Environmental Law Clinic.  The Environmental Law Clinic is the largest public interest environmental law firm in the State of Maryland devoted to providing free legal services to support environmental litigation and legal reform that protects the Chesapeake Bay Watershed.


×

Listen to The Marc Steiner Show • M-F 10am-Noon LISTEN LIVE